Thursday, June 24, 2010

Live Earthcycles Thursday US Social Forum

US Social Forum Live Detroit, Free Speech TV:




Watch Earthcycles Live Coverage at:
http://www.earthcycles.net/

North American Indigenous Peoples Developing Solutions at US Social Forum

Contact: IEN NPR (Native People Reporting) Media Team Cell: (507) 210-4679 indigenous.environmental.network@gmail.com
By Indigenous Environmental Network
DETROIT – A multi-generational delegation of Indigenous Peoples from North America have arrived in Detroit, Michigan this week to join other social justice movements at the United States Social Forum (USSF), a large gathering of diverse leaders developing powerful solutions to the economic and ecological crises we face. The delegation is comprised of Native American, Alaskan Native, and First Nation activists and leaders from the communities most affected by climate change and fossil fuel development in North America. They represent many Nations including Cree, Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara, Ojibwe, Kachiquel Mayan, Pasqua, Dakota, Navajo, Yup’ik, Swinomish, Mohawk, Oneida, Spokane, Colville, Couer d’Alene, Zuni, and Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation Read more: http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2010/06/north-american-indigenous-peoples.html

Detroit, Rising from the Ashes By Jeff Conant
If Detroit has come to represent post-industrial devastation and the efforts of grassroots communities to build and rebuild with hope and dignity, then Detroit’s waste incinerator, one of the largest in the world, is profoundly symbolic of the city’s plight, and serves as a crucible for the climate justice movement. This is why its been chosen as a target for action on Saturday, the last day of the U.S. Social Forum. Read article: http://climatevoices.wordpress.com/2010/06/24/detroit-rising-from-the-ashes

Detroit's Social Forum: Hope in a Crisis
Ben Ehrenreich The Nation
"Welcome to the D," said Kwamena Mensah in a resounding baritone on Tuesday morning. It was the first day of the 2010 US Social Forum and Mensah, president of the Detroit Black Community Food Security Network, was standing before a circle of about 65 activists to open a workshop on the thriving local urban agriculture movement. Mensa's group and Earthworks, a predominantly white urban farming group, combined what had originally been scheduled as two separate workshops in order to discuss their efforts to navigate complex and often painful racial dynamics in order to work together. Read article: http://www.thenation.com/article/36615/detroits-social-forum-hope-crisis

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Slide show photos by Brita Brookes, Jerry Fisher and Orin Langelle

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