Tuesday, November 30, 2010

Indigenous: What happened to Cochabamba Peoples Accord?

Statement of Concern from the Indigenous Environmental Network
What Happened to the Text from the Cochabamba’s People’s Accord?
By Indigenous Environmental Network
Media Contacts: IEN media hotline: +52 998 108 0748
Email: ienCop16media@gmail.com
Photo: Manny Pino, Acoma Pueblo, and Ofelia Rivas, O'odham, cochairs of Working Group on Indigenous Peoples in Cochabamba, Bolivia. Photo copyright Ben Powless, Mohawk.
CANCUN, Mexico -- As indigenous peoples, we are extremely concerned that the principles agreed upon in the Cochabamba People’s Agreement have been unilaterally removed from the negotiating document that was released on November 24th. Equally alarming is the misrepresentation of the Copenhagen Accord as a legitimate path forward, despite its widespread denouncement by civil society and its tepid reception last December in Denmark, when the United Nations merely “took note of” it. Read more ...http://redroadcancun.com/?p=983
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Press Conference: False Solutions to Climate Change Tuesday, Nov. 30, 2010

MEDIA ADVISORY
Global Justice Ecology Project with the Indigenous Environmental Network, Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives (GAIA) and the ETC Group present: FALSE SOLUTIONS TO CLIMATE CHANGE
Nuclear, Coal, Geoengineering and CDM Funding
(TUESDAY) WHO: Nikke Alex - Diné, USA is Diné (Navajo) originally from Dilcon, Arizona (Navajo Nation). She is the Executive Director of Black Mesa Water Coalition, an environmental justice organization based in Flagstaff, AZ. Nikke has carried out independent research about the impact of both uranium and coal mining on the Navajo people. Nikke has worked at the US Department of Justice in the Radiation Exposure Compensation Program and the US Environmental Protection Agency with the Tribal Science Council in Washington, DC.
Read more ...
http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/p/cancun-indigenous-alerts.html

Red Road Cancun: Explosing the lies and demanding climate justice

The Indigenous Environmental Network team exposes the scam of carbon trading, and the debt of polluting nations
By Brenda Norrell
Censored News
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com
Watch live and streaming videos: http://redroadcancun.com/?p=454
IEN media hotline: +52 998 108 0748
IEN e-mail:
ienCop16media@gmail.com
+Contacto de Medios IEN Medios: +52 998 108 0748; Correo Electrónico: IENcop16media@gmail.com

CANCUN, Mexico – The scam of carbon trading and false solutions to climate change are being exposed by the Indigenous Environmental Network, in a live broadcast from a crew of Native broadcasters at the Cancun Climate Summit.

The Indigenous Environmental Network’s live program, Red Road Cancun, http://www.redroadcancun.com/ was hosted today by Casey Camp-Horinek, Ponca from Oklahoma and Dallas Goldtooth, Dakota Navajo. The team includes Clayton Thomas-Muller, Cree and Tar Sands Campaign organizer from Canada.

Tom Goldtooth, IEN executive director, Navajo and Dakota, said the negotiations in Cancun are now being coopted by the industrialized nations, including the US, Canada and European nations.

“Carbon trading benefits the polluters of the north,” Goldtooth said. He also urged a halt to new fossil fuel development.

IEN is exposing the debt from the north and its responsibility to restore forests, without carbon offsets and carbon debts.

As tens of thousands of people arrive in Cancun, Goldtooth said the webcast, Red Road Cancun, is exposing the false solutions. “Carbon trading is hiding the real issues,” he said.

Social movements are converging on Cancun from throughout the world and demanding climate justice.

Goldtooth said IEN is looking at climate justice in regards to human rights issues, public health issues and Indigenous rights. He described the passion of social movements and Indigenous Peoples in building a base of resistance: Non-violent, direct action.

“As Native people we have to go to the heart of who we are,“ said Goldtooth, pointing out that Anishinaabe back home in Minnesota realize how the weather is changing, as they fish and carry out traditional lives, as do coastal Natives.

Goldtooth said the expansion of oil drilling, coal mines and power plants are destroying the earth while increasing pollution and sickness, especially for Native Americans.

In Cancun, Natives with IEN are exposing the contradictions of the United Nations’ official negotiations.

Goldtooth said it is important for the world to reevaluate the meaning of the sacredness of Mother Earth. Indigenous Peoples with traditional knowledge have solutions and have the right to have a voice, he said.

On the issues of global justice, Goldtooth said there has been a blackout by the media. “We have been here, but we have been invisible.”

Calling on people around the world to support climate justice, Goldtooth said December 7 is a day of global protest and action. “One Thousand Cancuns,“ is mobilizing people around the world.

Indigenous Peoples, including IEN, are supporting Bolivia and President Evo Morales, which created the Conference on Climate Change and the Rights of Mother Earth in Cochabamba, Bolivia, in April. This gathering resulted in the Peoples Agreement on the Rights of Mother Earth.

With their own Native communication team in Cancun, Goldtooth said IEN is watching the governments of the world and what message the media is spinning.

The multinational corporations back home, he said, do not want Native people to hear what Indigenous Peoples are saying in Cancun.

Pushing for a real reduction of greenhouse gases, Goldtooth said, “We are able to bring that truth to light through the media.”

Twa-le Abrahamson, Spokane Naiton, founding member and Youth Coordinator of the SHAWL (Sovereignty, Health, Air, Water, Land) Society, from Washington state, is on IEN’s communication team.

Abrahamson is sharing the news of the climate justice being organized for people of color in Cancun, including those of Youth for Climate Justice from the US, which is creating a leadership pipeline for youth of color. During today’s interview, it was pointed out that people that don’t have the $350 to stay at the Moon Palace each night in Cancun, are struggling with getting to the sessions, especially minorities, who are being excluded from the process.

Abrahamson attended the Indigenous Caucus Meeting at the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change today. "Indigenous Peoples are the most adversely affected by the effects and some of the proposed solutions of climate change. Nuclear energy is being marketed around the world as a clean/green energy source. It is not," she said.

Kandi Mossett spoke of burying her friend, her own age, from cancer, back home in North Dakota. Describing the pollution from the power plants and other pollution surrounding Native people, Mossett said, “We are human beings, just because we don’t have money, doesn’t mean we don’t have feelings.” Mossett is a member of the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nation from Fort Berthold.

Mossett described how carbon trading market scams result in Indigenous Peoples losing their forests, after signing contracts that appear on the surface to be "saving the forests." Then, non Native species are planted that harm the environment and Native people lose all control of their forests and their homelands.

Ben Powless, Mohawk, observing the UN negotiations, said Indigenous Peoples are the most impacted from the destruction of Mother Earth. “It is time for respecting Indigenous rights and respecting Indigenous sovereignty,“ said Powless, adding that Indigenous Peoples are in Cancun to bring real change, not superficial change.
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RED ROAD CANCUN: Watch the live show at noon Central time each day, with videos streaming all day each day, webcast by Earthcycles:
http://redroadcancun.com/?p=454
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Return to Censored News Homepage

Monday, November 29, 2010

Red Road Cancun: Indigenous Voices Live from Cancun

By Brenda Norrell
Censored News http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com
Photo: Ben Powless, Mohawk/IEN

(NOV 29, 2010) The Indigenous Environmental Network is broadcasting live from the Cancun Climate Summit. Red Road Cancun, http://www.redroadcancun.com/, webcast by Earthcycles, offers the world the voices of Indigenous Peoples.

These are the voices that polluting corporations and governments do not want to be heard. As profiteers push for carbon market scams and seizures of land and water rights, IEN is providing an online platform for Indigenous voices to halt threats to Indian lands, water and forests.

At the Conference on Climate Change and the Rights of Mother Earth, in Cochabamba, Bolivia, in April, more than 35,000 people gathered at the invitation of President Evo Morales. The majority were Indigenous Peoples. There were 17 working groups which produced declarations, culminating in the Peoples Agreement. It calls for new standards for greenhouse emissions and recognition of the rights of Mother Earth. The Peoples Agreement upholds the rights of Indigenous Peoples and states that corporations and governments are to be held accountable in court for pollution.

Ofelia Rivas, O’odham, was cochair of the Working Group on Indigenous Peoples in Cochabamba. Rivas, from the US/Mexico border region, is an independent grassroots Indigenous delegate. Rivas is among those taking the Declarations of the People from Cochabamba to Cancun.

Rivas will also be carrying another document, "In Defense of Water," from the National Indigenous Congress which met on the Yaquis' Vicam Pueblo, Sonora, Mexico, in November. Yaquis are among those whose water rights are under attack by the government of Mexico.

In Defense of Water begins with: “Water, our Mother and Father, is that which gives us life, along with the Earth, Fire, and Air. It is the foundation of our lives and of the existence of everything that is born and that is alive; and it is not something that you can buy and sell in the way that capitalism destroys our Mother Earth.”

In Cancun, Indigenous Peoples and campesinas are also arriving by caravans from throughout Mexico, with protests and marches planned for Mexico City and Cancun.

IEN said world leaders will again meet for the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP 16 & CMP 6) to discuss climate change and collaborate on finding answers for many multi-level questions on how to deal with mitigation, restoration, and prevention of further damage.

The Red Road Cancun webcast will include the stories of Native Americans suffering from coal mines and power plants. IEN will share stories of communities standing up to threats from industries who want their forests to "offset" their pollution.

“We will be highlighting stories from communities that are taking real and effective action to address the climate crisis. Communities that are protecting their forests from being logged; that are shutting down polluting industries in their own back yard, or that are creating small-scale renewable energy projects,” IEN said.

Red Road Cancan will webcast noon to 1 pm CST, and recast at 5 pm CST daily, Nov. 29—Dec. 10, 2010.
http://www.redroadcancun.com/

Watch live streaming video from abyayalanexus at livestream.com

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Sunday, November 28, 2010

Vicam Pueblo: In Defense of Water, National Indigenous Congress 2010

NATIONAL INDIGENOUS CONGRESS

DECLARATION OF VÍCAM
IN DEFENSE OF WATER, THE EARTH, AND THE SOVEREIGNTY OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES

English translation by Sal Baldenegro and Wenona Benally
Espanol: http://censored-news.blogspot.com/2010/11/vicam-pueblo-en-defensa-del-agua.html
Censored News
Photo 1: Sonora coastline Photo 2 National Indigenous Congress 2010 on Yaqui Pueblo copyright Ofelia Rivas, O'odham
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GATHERED IN THE HOMELAND OF THE YAQUI, THE PEOPLES, TRIBES, AND NATIONS OF THE PURÉPECHA, NAHUA, WIXÁRIKA, COCAPAH, O'ODHAM, YAQUI, MAYO-YOREME, MIXTECO, TRIQUI, TZOTZIL AND OTOMÍ, IN COOPERATION WITH MEXICAN CIVIL SOCIETY ORGANIZATIONS, AND WITH VARIOUS COUNTRIES OF THE AMERICAS, ASIA, AND EUROPE TO CELEBRATE THE FIRST NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL FORUM IN DEFENSE OF WATER, AND RECOGNIZING THAT:

1. WATER, OUR MOTHER AND FATHER, IS THAT WHICH GIVES US LIFE ALONG WITH THE EARTH, FIRE, AND AIR. IT IS THE FOUNDATION OF OUR LIVES AND OF THE EXISTENCE OF EVERYTHING THAT IS BORN AND THAT IS ALIVE; AND IT IS NOT SOMETHING THAT YOU CAN BUY AND SELL IN THE WAY THAT CAPITALISM DESTROYS OUR MOTHER EARTH.

2. THE EARTH, THE WATER, AND EVERYTHING THAT IS BORN TO THEM BIND OUR ANCESTRAL LANDS AND ARE INSEPARABLE, EVEN WHEN NEO-LIBERALISM IN ITS DESIRE FOR PROFITS SEEKS TO DESTROY THE EARTH IN ORDER TO MAKE THE EARTH’S ELEMENTS INTO PRIVATE COMMODITIES;

3. THE MAJOR CORPORATIONS, BOTH NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL, IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE MEXICAN GOVERNMENT, SEEK TO APPROPRIATE OUR LAND AND THE RESOURCES OF OUR NATION, GENERATING LAWS, POLICIES, AND ACTIONS TOWARD THE CAPITALIST PRIVATIZATION OF THE WATERS, RIVERS, BEACHES, SEAS, LAKES, SPRINGS, LAND, FORESTS, MINERALS, PLANTS, AND TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE;

4. IN THIS CONFERENCE OF THE INDIGENOUS PEOPLES OF THE AMERICAS, HAVING TAKEN PLACE ON THE 11TH, 12TH, 13TH AND 14TH DAYS OF OCTOBER, 2007, IN THIS LAND OF THE YAQUI TRIBE, WE HAVE AGREED TO REJECT COLONIALISM AND CAPITALIST EXTERMINATION IMPOSED BY THE TRANSNATIONAL CORPORATIONS AND THE INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL ENTITIES WHO ARE COMPLICIT WITH THE SUPERPOWERS OF THE WORLD.

WE ALSO HAVE AGREED TO REJECT THE DESTRUCTION AND PILLAGING OF MOTHER EARTH THROUGH THE OCCUPATION OF OUR LAND FOR THE PURPOSES OF INDUSTRY, MINING, AGRICULTURE, TOURISM, URBANIZATION, AND DEVELOPMENT IN ADDITION TO PRIVATIZATION OF THE WATER, THE EARTH, THE FORESTS, THE SEAS AND THE COASTS, BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY, THE AIR, THE RAIN, TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE, AND EVERYTHING ELSE WHICH COMES FROM MOTHER EARTH, AS WE ARE OPPOSED TO THE APPROPRIATION OF THE LAND, COASTS, WATERS, SEEDS, PLANTS, ANIMALS, AND TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE OF OUR PEOPLES FOR THE PURPOSE OF PRIVATIZING THEM.

WE MAKE THE FOLLOWING PRONOUNCEMENT:
FIRST, WE OPPOSE THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE EL NOVILLO DAM AQUEDUCT BY THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT, THE STATE GOVERNOR, AND THE BILLIONAIRE CARLOS SLIM, THAT AIMS TO BRING ALMOST ALL OF THE WATER OF THE YAQUI RIVER TO THE MUNICIPALITY OF HERMOSILLO TO BE USED BY DEVELOPERS, TOURISTS, AND BIG AGRIBUSINESSES, WHEN THE EXECUTION OF SAID PROJECT WILL STRIP THE YAQUI TRIBE OF THEIR WATER WITHOUT THEIR CONSENT, ANNULLING THEIR SOVEREIGNTY AND THEIR HISTORICAL RIGHT TO THE YAQUI RIVER BASIN, PROVOKING THE DESTRUCTION OF THE LAND AND THE EXTERMINATION OF THE TRIBE IN ADDITION TO THE PROFOUND EFFECT ON THE ECOLOGICAL EQUILIBRIUM OF THE SOUTH OF SONORA AND THE RUIN OF FARMERS IN THE YAQUI VALLEY.
SECOND, WE REJECT THE DISPOSSESSION AND PRIVATE APPROPRIATION OF THE WATER, RIVERS, WASHES, SPRINGS, DEEP WATERS, LAKES, ESTUARIES, COASTS, SEAS, BEACHES, AND EVERYTHING THAT BINDS THE LAND OF OUR PEOPLES AS WELL AS THE CONSTRUCTION OF AQUEDUCTS AND DAMS FOR THE PURPOSES OF HOARDING THE WATER FOR COMMERCIAL USES. WATER IS FUNDAMENTAL TO LIFE, AND SO WE STRONGLY OPPOSE THE HOARDING OF WATER BY PRIVATE INTERESTS WHO CONSIDER IT AS A COMMODITY TO BE BOUGHT AND SOLD. WE OPPOSE ALL LAWS, REGULATIONS, AND GOVERNMENT POLICIES INTENDING TO PRIVATIZE WATER.
THIRD, WE AFFIRM OUR HISTORIC RIGHT TO SELF-DETERMINATION AS INDIGENOUS PEOPLES, NATIONS, AND TRIBES, RESPECTING THE DIFFERENT WAYS OF OUR PEOPLES ACCORDING TO THEIR ORIGINS, HISTORY, AND ASPIRATIONS.
FOURTH, AHEAD OF THE HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE MEXICAN REVOLUTION, WE SAY THAT THIS HISTORIC STRUGGLE, JUST LIKE THE ONES BEFORE IT, COST OUR PEOPLE MUCH BLOOD AND WE GAINED LITTLE OR NOTHING IN RETURN FOR THE SACRIFICES THAT WERE MADE BY OUR GRANDFATHERS TO BUILD AND LIBERATE THE COUNTRY OF ALL MEXICANS, SINCE THE SUCCESSIVE CONSTITUTIONS OF 1824, 1857, AND 1917 DID NOT EVEN RECOGNIZE OUR EXISTENCE.
FIFTH, WE ARE PUTTING OUT A CALL TO STRENGTHEN THE SOVEREIGNTY OF OUR PEOPLES TO DEFEND THE EARTH, THE LAND, THE MOUNTAINS, THE WATERS, THE NATURAL AND SPIRITUAL BEINGS AS WELL AS OUR CULTURES, AND TO STRENGTHEN OUR GOVERNMENTS, OUR COUNCILS, AND OUR TRADITIONAL AUTHORITIES UNDER THE PRINCIPLE OF LEAD BY OBEYING.
SIXTH, WE REJECT THE GOVERNMENTAL AND PARAMILITARY REPRESSION UNLEASHED UPON OUR PEOPLES, ESPECIALLY TOWARD THE TRIQUI PEOPLE OF OAXACA, THE COMMUNITIES OF THE CARACOLES AND JUNTAS DE BUEN GOBIERNO ZAPATISTAS OF CHIAPAS, THE NAHUA COMMUNITY OF SANTA MARÍA OSTULA, MICHOACÁN, AND THE TZOTZIL COMMUNITY OF MITZITÓN, CHIAPAS; WE ALSO OPPOSE THE FORCED DISPLACEMENT OF THE AUTONOMOUS MUNCIPALITY OF SAN JUAN COPALA AND THE MILITARIZATION OF THE TRIQUI REGION, CALLING ALL THE TRIQUI WOMEN, MEN, BOYS, GIRLS, AND ELDERS TO REBUILD THE UNITY OF THEIR PEOPLE WITHOUT THE INTERFERENCE OF ORGANIZATIONS AND WITHOUT THE INTRUSION OF OUTSIDE INTERESTS THAT PROVOKE CONFRONTATION AMONG THE TRIQUI PEOPLE.
SEVENTH, WE DEMAND THE IMMEDIATE RELEASE OF OUR BROTHERS IN STRUGGLE WHO THE GOVERNMENT HAS IMPRISONED IN ORDER TO SILENCE THEIR VOICES.
EIGHTH, WE COMMEND THE COURAGEOUS EFFORTS OF THE NAHUA COMMUNITY OF SAN SALVADOR ATENCO AND MAINTAIN OUR UNCONDITIONAL SUPPORT OF THEIR RESISTANCE IN OPPOSITION TO THE CONTINUED EFFORTS THAT SEEK TO DISPOSSESS THEM OF THEIR LAND.
NINTH, WE CALL ON ALL INDIGENOUS PEOPLES TO CONTINUE BUILDING AND STRENGTHENING THE NATIONAL INDIGENOUS CONFERENCE AS THE HOME OF OUR PEOPLES.

VÍCAM, LAND OF THE YAQUI TRIBE, 21 NOVEMBER 2010

YOURS SINCERELY

PARTICIPANT PEOPLES, TRIBES, AND NATIONS OF THE INAUGURAL NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON THE DEFENSE OF WATER

Saturday, November 27, 2010

BOLIVIA: Cancun should not be Copenhagen Part II

Cancun Climate Summit: Even before the summit begins, the World Bank and corporate governments are scheming, targeting forests for carbon credit scams and the Earth for more pollution

By World Peoples Conference on Climate Change and the Rights of Mother Earth
Censored News http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com
Photo 1: IEN Bolivia
CANCUN, Mexico -- (November 27, 2010) – At the next meeting of the Conference of Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP 16), which begins November 29th in Cancun, Mexico, the 192 member states must agree on a second commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol. However, on November 24th, the President of the Ad-Hoc Working group on Long-Term Action issued a new document that attempts to legitimize the “Copenhagen Accord,” which the United Nations merely “took note of” last December in Denmark. Read more ...
http://pwccc.wordpress.com
Live webstream from the Indigenous Environmental Network's Red Road Cancun begins Monday, Nov. 29, 2010:
http://www.redroadcancun.com

Friday, November 26, 2010

VIDEO Mark Maracle Mohawk Warrior Society

Mark Maracle, Mohawk Warrior Society, speaks on the Great Law, the imaginery border and the colonizers who destroyed civilization. AIM West video 2009. (Part I)

Watch Part II: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=60rXzpEk1RQ&feature=related

AIM Women's Leadership: Infiltration and stalking by US agents


Women in the American Indian Movement share the stories of their lives
By Brenda Norrell
Censored News

SAN FRANCISCO -- Women in the American Indian Movement shared stories of lives lived with great courage, as federal agents stalked them and attempted to intimidate them, during the AIM International Conference this week.
The AIM Women’s Leadership panel brought together five AIM women to share their life stories. Anne Begay, Navajo, was among them. Begay is the mother of Kathy Peltier, the daughter of Leonard Peltier.
Begay spoke of her Dine’ family, a medicine family of men and women medicine people, who provided her with a childhood of structure, rich with history and culture.
After returning from the Longest Walk in 1978, Begay took her daughter Kathy to the park one day. Her daughter was about two years old at the time.
“This gentleman sat down next to me, with shiny shoes.”
He began to question her.
“Who’s her father?”
“None of your business,” Begay told him. He persisted with his questions and referred to the murder of Anna Mae Aquash.
He said, “Well, we know who you are. And if you’re smart, you’ll know what we did to Anna Mae can happen to your daughter too.”
“So, for all those years, it has been terrifying,“ Begay said, “to know that they can do that to my daughter.”
Speaking on the panel, Yvonne Swan, Colville from Washington State, spoke of being under government surveillance in the 1970s, because Leonard Peltier was her friend, and Bill Kunstler was her lawyer.
Swan spoke of learning to become aware of the men “with shiny shoes,” and men in suits, parked in unmarked cars. She trained her children to watch for these men, and once her son was grabbed by one of them, but was able to get away.
During her fight against corporate mining, she also watched for those federal agents that stalked members of the American Indian Movement.
“The government is merely a screen for the rich corporations,” Swan said. “They have the money to buy people off, they have the money to send people in to disrupt.
“But don’t ever underestimate the power of the people.”
Opening the panel discussion, Swan said the voices on the panel were coming from the hearts and spirits of the women.
“We’re survivors of abuse as women, as is Mother Earth, as is Grandmother Moon.”
Speaking of the importance of the American Indian Movement, Swan said she takes her actions seriously and holds herself accountable.
“We’re caretakers, we are up against the destroyers.”
“We are told to not take more than we need, because there are future generations that are coming that will be hungry.”
Swan pointed out that the Six Nations model of governance became the model for the US Bill of Rights. However, the US removed the aspects of the Six Nations governance that gave US women power and leadership. Ultimately, the US tortured and imprisoned women in the US as they fought for their right to vote.
Swan also pointed out the role of the Pope that resulted in American Indians being called “Savages.”
Madonna Thunderhawk, Lakota, said the struggles are intergenerational, the struggles for the “land, water, our people, the children.”
“The work continues, the struggle continues.”
Thunderhawk said she has continued to struggle since the 1960s in South Dakota, because this is what the movement taught her.
“I learned not to just sit back and complain.”
Thunderhawk said she appreciated seeing the youths present at the conference, and that Clyde Bellecourt’s talks always fire her up.
Corine Fairbanks of Santa Barbara, Calif., AIM, spoke of watching out for personal egos and those on Facebook who pose as traditional Indians, but are actually New Agers. Fairbanks also spoke of disruptions, with people carrying out the work of federal agents by spreading negative comments.
Speaking on infiltration, Fairbanks pointed out that even small groups of peace activities are targeted for infiltration by US agents.
Morning Star Gali, Pit River, born in the AIM Oakland house, said organizing within the movement has been an honor.
“For me, the movement was always grounded in a place of spirituality and love, that was the movement I was raised in.”
Morning Star spoke of bullying and abuse. She encouraged women to support one another.
“We’re survivors, we’re survivors of rape, we’re survivors of abuse.”
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Watch this webcast, recorded live by Earthcycles. Women's panel begins at time: 1:54:00 on this video:
http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/11046674
Read about the case that led to Yvonne Swan Wanrow becoming a hero for women and Indian rights, in a case involving the sexual abuse of children:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yvonne_Wanrow





Watch Parts II, III, IV and V
http://www.youtube.com/user/mihoaida

Thursday, November 25, 2010

Navajo Jean Whitehorse: Boarding schools, relocation and sterilization



The Occupation of Alcatraz offered Navajo Jean Whitehorse the best education
By Brenda Norrell
Censored News
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com


SAN FRANCISCO -- Jean Whitehorse, Navajo, endured the US government’s boarding schools, relocation and sterilization. Today, she says the BIA unwittingly gave her the best education that money could buy; not by giving her job training in the San Francisco area, but by placing her near the Occupation of Alcatraz.
At the age of 19, it was the right time and the right place for Whitehorse to learn who she was as an American Indian.
Speaking at the 42nd Anniversary of the American Indian Movement, during the weeklong conference, Whitehorse described her own journey, beginning with the exile of her people, the Navajo or Dine’.
Whitehorse said when Navajos were forced on the Longest Walk, they were removed from their homeland for four years. The government returned Navajos to only ten percent of their land, and only did so because the government felt the land was worthless. Later, oil, gas, uranium and coal were discovered on Navajoland.
Whitehorse, from the Eastern Agency of New Mexico on the Navajo Nation, said she grew up with abuse in boarding schools. The “Board of Education was the ruler. It was to punish you. My whole boarding school experience was all about abuse.”
She said in those days, parents were not able to defend their children. “Back then, our mothers and fathers weren’t there to talk for us. They weren’t there to protect us.”
Next came relocation. Whitehorse was sent to the Bay area to learn a vocation, then was pressured to stay and work. During this time, she went to Alcatraz, two months after the initial takeover in 1969. This came at the time of Black Panthers and protests of the Vietnam War. San Francisco offered an education.
“I had to learn to survive.” From the very beginning, she wanted to go home, she did not know where she was. However, she was told that she was to learn a vocational skill. When she persisted to go home, she was told the BIA would get her a job.
“The longer I stayed here -- they kept me here -- I learned about myself, what it means to be an American Indian.”
Praising the young people who attended the AIM conference, Nov. 22-26, she urged Indian youths to learn their traditions, ceremonies and songs. “Learn your language, that is how you are going to learn to be strong.”
Whitehorse pointed out that Navajo elders say that when the people stop speaking their language, they will stop being identified as who they are as a people.
Urging young people to learn about their real history, she said it is important to know that the land of Navajos is held in trust by the US government and what that means in terms of natural resources.
Whitehorse studied law one year in order to make sure she understood federal Indian law. She discovered the secret of federal Indian law.
“I found out that it is not written to help us. It is written for Congress to use as they please.” She pointed out that Navajo elders are still being relocated because of the coal on their lands.
Besides being a target of relocation, Whitehorse was the target of another well-funded US government program.
It was “Native American sterilization, another genocide, another way to attack us.”
“Some of us were told, ‘You’re unfit to bring your own kind into this world. You’re uneducated, you’re on welfare. Your children are going to be on welfare too.’
“I only had one daughter when they did that to me. Sometimes I wish I had four or five children.”
“I’m very happy that a lot of families have little children,“ she said, urging parents to hold on to their children, and bring them up right.
“Make sure they keep their language.”
After boarding schools, relocation and sterilization, came self-determination.
But, she said, American Indian self-determination does not come easy.
“We have to work at it,“ she said, stressing the need to reunite and be strong. She said the future is in the hands of the youths.
The relocation programs were about removing the young people from the land, so the land could be seized for the resources.
Whitehorse said she stayed in the Bay area for four years, then went home.
“My education is very important to me. When I talk about where I’ve been, where I’m going, I always say, ‘I was here at the right time, at the right place, at the BIA’s expense.’ They sent me here, paid my way around, gave me money to stay. The more I stayed, the more involved I got with the movement on the island.”
Whitehorse said, "Stand up for what's right, even if you are standing alone."
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Listen to more of this presentation, along with a talk by Yvonne Swan, Colville. Recorded by Earthcycles: http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/11027639

Watch Jean Whitehorse's presentations at the 2009 AIM West Conference.
Video by Mary Ellen Churchill. Filmed in San Francisco, California, November 23rd, 2009.
Part 1:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fkIRkaBmmwo
Part 2:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=87C513-G_Xo&feature=related
Part 3:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OtX7zVc6Zus

Listen: Alcatraz Sunrise Ceremony: KPFA Alcatraz Free Radio

Listen now, recorded live by KPFA:
Alcatraz Sunrise Ceremony

http://www.kpfa.org/archive/id/65584
Sunrise Ceremony - November 25, 2010 at 6:00am

Click to listen (or download)
Article and photos by Brenda Norrell/Censored News
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com
SAN FRANCISCO -- Thousands of people gathered on Alcatraz Island to remember those who occupied the island in 1969 in a stand of resistance for Native American rights.
Before first light, the ceremony began with Pomo traditional dancers. Maori are among those honoring the traditions and culture of their peoples.
Before sunrise, live on KPFA Radio, Wounded Knee spoke of the Shellmound Walk and the need to protect the Shellmounds. Radley Davis offered a traditional song, with Doug Duncan and the Pomo Dancers. With more than 4,000 people gathered, children and family members of those who occupied Alcatraz shared memories.
Fred Short spoke on honoring the traditions and recognizing the warriors who stood up against the oppression of the government.
Clyde Bellecourt said at the time Alcatraz was occupied, in the late '60s and early '70s, nothing was being done to uplift the conditions of American Indian people. Speaking of the US colonizers, Bellecourt said this is the day of "Thanks-taking" for European immigrants to the US.
"We're not minorities, we are sovereign nations," Bellecourt said.

Host Mary Jean Robertson pointed out that some of the first prisoners at Alcatraz were Hopi who refused to send their children to boarding schools. She also asked for everyone to call President Obama and urge for the release of Leonard Peltier.
Bellecourt reminded people that the time has come, as he said earlier, to "hold Obama's feet to the fire," and demand the release of Leonard Peltier and for the US to adopt the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
The United States is the last country in the world to adopt or endorse the Declaration, already adopted by the United Nations.
Tony Gonzales, AIM West, spoke of the rallies planned for the UN Climate Summit in Cancun, Nov. 29--Dec. 10, 2010.
Gonzales said that the AIM West Conference on Friday, at the Baha'i Center, will focus on climate change and the upcoming UN Climate Summit in Cancun. The Indigenous Environmental Network, with executive director Tom Goldtooth, will be in Cancun with a delegation. Gonzales said a concert concludes this week's AIM West Conference on Friday night: http://www.aimwest.info
Speaking with a guest from Vietnam, Mary Jean Robertson, said she hopes the US government will do something about the Agent Orange dropped on the Vietnamese people.
Ann Marie Sayers, Ohlone, spoke of the morning sky and wished everyone a safe journey home. "Honoring the ancestors is a reason to live," Sayers said.
Radio hosts Mary Jean Robertson of KPFA's Bay Native Circle with KPFA's Miguel Molina and Tony Gonzales of AIM West, along with other radio hosts.

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

AIM Conference: Video Highlights 2010


LINKS TO VIDEO HIGHLIGHS
AIM Women share strength and power at 42nd AIM Anniversary
By Brenda Norrell
Censored News
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com/
SAN FRANCISCO -- The American Indian Movement's 42nd Anniversary continues today, Friday, at the Baha'i Center, beginning at noon, with a concert at 6 pmt: www.aimwest.info
Here are some highlights from Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday webcasts by Earthcycles. (Move the time bar, the tiny circle, forward to locate speakers on the videos.)
AIM Women's Leadership: Go to hour 1:54:30; Morning Star, Madona Thunderhawk, Yvonne Swan, Anne Begay and Corine Fairbanks:
http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/11046674
Wednesday evening: Aztec dancers, Clyde Bellecourt and the Native Youth Discussion:
http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/11067683
Clyde Bellecourt, AIM cofounder: Go to time: 1:27:00:
http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/11046674
Yvonne Swan, Colville, and Jean Whitehorse, Navajo:
http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/11027639
Indigenous Rights speaker Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz. Speakers on disenrollments at Robinson Rancheria. Go to hour: 1:00:00
http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/11028232
Protection of burial grounds, Shellmounds and other sacred places. Wounded Knee and Morning Star. Go to time: 17:00:
http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/11044797
Diabetes: Native speakers on diabetes and eating healthy, presenters with audience discussion. Go to time: 58:00:
http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/11030202

Tuesday, November 23, 2010

Zapatistas and Vicam Yaquis: In Defense of Water



Photos above: Copyright Ofelia Rivas, O'odham. (Top) The Defense of the Water in Vicam Pueblo, Sonora, with Yaqui authorities, CNI representatives and organizers of the event.

National Indigenous Congress: Official document 'En Defensa del Agua'
http://www.scribd.com/doc/44094723/Defensa-del-Agua-DECLARACION-DE-VICAM
English translation: Declaration 'In Defense of Water'
http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2010/11/vicam-pueblo-in-defense-of-water.html

At the Indigenous National Congress on Yaqui's Vicam Pueblo, Zapatistas are the Stronghold

By Brenda Norrell
Censored News
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com
Photo: Ofelia Rivas at Bolivia Climate Summit/Copyright Ben Powless
VICAM PUEBLO, Sonora, Mexico -- The Zapatistas joined Indigenous Peoples from throughout Mexico at the Yaquis’ Vicam Pueblo in Sonora, Mexico, for the National Indigenous Congress. With the urgent message, “In Defense of Water,” Indigenous Peoples united in the struggle for autonomy and protection of Mother Earth.

Ofelia Rivas, founder of the O’odham Voice Against the Wall from the US/Mexico border region, was a member of the O’odham traditional delegation. Zapatista Comandantes from Chiapas joined Indigenous from Michoacán, Veracruz, Oaxaca and throughout Mexico.

While focused on the defense of water, Rivas recognized the Zapatistas as the Stronghold for Indigenous Peoples and pointed out the systematic displacement of Indigenous Peoples in Mexico.

Rivas said O’odham went to Vicam Pueblo as members of the National Indigenous Congress, Nov. 20-21, to support the people in defense of water and to discuss land, water, autonomy and the impacts of bad government.

O’odham also brought their message. In northern Sonora, a road is being constructed through O’odham land, which O’odham never gave consent for. O'odham did not give consent for the use of their water. Both their fresh lagoons and the Sea of Cortez, as non-O‘odham refer to it, are impacted by this new development.

She said during the Congress the people created a strong Declaration from the National Indigenous Congress and the Yaqui Peoples. While there, Yaqui shared the story of their water, which originates in the Sierra Madres. The precious water of Yaquis is now targeted by the Mexican government, which plans to build an aqueduct to divert it.

“Even in Mexico, the treaties with the Yaquis have never been honored,” Rivas said, pointing out that both Mexico and the United States have failed to honor Indian treaties.

Rivas said Mexico’s new project would further divert water that Yaquis use for agriculture and survival. As a result, Yaquis have filed a lawsuit in Obregon against Mexico to regain their water rights.

Rivas said traveling in Mexico means enduring checkpoints and always wondering whether one would make it to their destination. (The Rio Yaqui pueblos are located about an eight hour drive south of the US/Mexico border.)

While camping in Vicam Pueblo for three days, O’odham were honored to observe the strong Yaqui culture and ceremonies. Rivas urged support for the Yaquis to halt the systematic oppression, which will diminish their way of life. “They need the support of all people.”

“The government is dividing the people to fight amongst each another.”

With increased removal for their homelands by the government of Mexico, Yaqui and other Indigenous Peoples are now faced with displacement and separation from their communities, long known as one of the first steps in the genocide of peoples.

“It looks like the reservation system," she said.

Rivas said Mexico is removing Indian people from their territories, while claiming that new programs will end their poverty with subsistence. Meanwhile, the killing continues.

“They are still killing us, Indigenous Peoples, throughout Mexico.”

While the bloodshed continues, Rivas said Indigenous Peoples are continuing to build autonomy and addressing bad government.

This new unity and strength of Indigenous Peoples is resulting in fresh attacks from governments and corporations. She said the bad government sees the people standing up. “This is the reason for the new attacks; there is a building of strength of Indigenous Peoples from throughout all the world.”

“We will always stand up for the defense of the water, the defense of the land, the defense of our autonomy, the defense of our way of life.”

Reflecting on the role of the Zapatistas, she said, “The uprising of the people has been the Stronghold.”

“The Zapatistas are the Stronghold for us Indigenous Peoples. They were pushed to the limit, where they said ‘OK, enough is enough! We are not going to let them take our lands, take our way of life, take our food, take our culture and exploit who we are as people.’”

“We’ve existed for thousands of years in our own systems. It is our way of life. We governed ourselves.”

“It has always been in defense for all creation, it has never been for individuals, specific organizations or governments. It has always been in defense of all living things. That is still the message of the Zapatistas.”

“This bad government is trying to dismantle that and divide the people.”

In Vicam, O’odham described the militarization of their homeland, Tohono O’odham land on the US/Mexico border.

“Every other day the helicopter comes at night, spotlights the homes and goes back and forth.” No one explains to the people what the Border Patrol is doing, working at night in the desert with heavy machinery. For O’odham who gather firewood or venture out at night, asking questions of the Border Patrol means risking one’s life, detainment or harassment.

O’odham women cannot sleep at night.

Rivas, cochair of the Working Group on Indigenous Peoples at the Bolivia Climate Summit, is now preparing to attend the UN Climate Summit in Cancun, Nov. 29--Dec. 10, as an Indigenous grassroots delegate. Indigenous Peoples and campesinas are arriving by caravans, and establishing tent communities and marches during the summit.

Rivas said she will carry from Cochabamba to Cancun the strength of the people. She will also carry the hope of the people in the United Nations, that it will work for real change. She said governments must stop denying global warming and set standards to decrease emissions, in order “to halt the contamination of the air we breathe and the water we drink.”

“The huge governments, developed nations, need to be responsible.”

Rivas encouraged Indigenous Peoples to remain centered in their traditions.

“We need to return to our ceremonial way of life, return to our prayers and start really concentrating on the well being of Mother Earth, which is how we survived these thousands and thousands of years as Indigenous Peoples.”

“We need to go back to that and for people to realize that we have not disappeared off the land. We are still here.”

“We need to survive through Mother Earth and be responsible. Protect Mother Earth in any way you can,” she said, urging simple acts like not buying throwaway plastics.

“We need to remember to return to those roots. It will really make a change in our lives.”
Rivas can be contacted at the O’odham Solidarity Project. Please consider donating to assist with Ofelia Rivas' room costs for the UN Climate Summit in Cancun:
http://www.solidarity-project.org/
Listen to Ofelia Rivas' interview on this gathering of the National Indigenous Congress on the Defense of Water.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/brenda-norrell
Read Yaquis statement: In Defense of Water
http://censored-news.blogspot.com/2010/11/zapatistas-yaqui-in-defense-of-wateral.html

LISTEN NOW: Clyde Bellecourt AIM San Francisco

42nd Anniversary of AIM
hosted by AIM West
UPDATED:
Listen NOW: AIM Women's Leadership

Yvonne Swan, Morning Star Gali, Anne Begay, Madonna Thunder Hawk and Corine Fairbanks.
Anne Begay, Navajo, mother of Kathy Peltier, daughter of Leonard Peltier, told of being questioned when Kathy was two years old.
He said, “Well, we know who you are. And if you’re smart, you’ll know what we did to Anna Mae can happen to your daughter too.”
The women's panel is speaking now of infiltration and the government agents with "shiny shoes" that stalked them and led to lives of fear for their children.
Yvonne Swan, Colville, said the government is just a screen for the corporations. Madonna Thunderhawk, Lakota, spoke of the beginning of the movement and the harmony and spirit of family that existed. "As Clyde said, 'We were a movement.'" She said, "Anyone could jump on our bandwagon."
"The respect was just there."
Thunderhawk spoke of men and women treating one another with respect and dignity.
To watch the AIM Women's Leadership presentation, slide time bar (the tiny circle forward to 1:54:00 ) Watch video recorded Tuesday:
http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/11046674
Previous speaker on video: Clyde Bellecourt

Monday, November 22, 2010

VIDEO: Virginia Police attack Akwesasne film crew in 'Mississippi Burning' style attack

video
Virginia State Police vs. Akwesasne
by Giniti Harcum El Bey

Censored News www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com

Virginia State Police stopped van occupied by Onkwehonwe shooting movie in Virginia. Driver was allegedly speeding and did not have license. He got two tickets.
Troopers starting Harassing Leadhorse Choctaw, because he didn't have ID and arrested him. Leadhorse was released on $5000 bail.
The men were told that Northerners and Indians are not liked here because this is where the South surrendered to the North in War of Aggression (misnomer Civil War). Ely Parker (Seneca) drew up the surrender papers and it is said to have actually accepted the surrender.
What crimes did these cops commit? Tell it to them.
Virginia State Police James M. Buzzard Badge 551 Division 3 - Area 21 240 Third Division Loop
Appomattox, Virginia 24522 Phone complaint: 434-352-7128 (434-352-9058 Fax)

LIVE TODAY: AIM Conference, Nov. 22, 2010

WATCH LIVE NOW TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY:
Earthcycles website is down Tuesday morning. Watch live on Ustream:
http://www.ustream.tv/channel/kmecradio

AIM International 42nd Anniversary, San Francisco, Nov. 22-26, 2010

Live on the web:
Earthcycles is setting up and the broadcst will begin shortly:
http://www.earthcycles.net/
Photo: AIM conference Friday nigh concert 2009 San Francisco/Brenda Norrell
.
AIM West: www.aimwest.info
Monday, November 22nd 10:00AM – 6:00 pm
San Francisco City College, Mission Campus 1125 Valencia Street *
10:00 am Welcoming Ceremony, Introduction; and theme, Climate Change, Land and Self-Determination. Special Guests speakers: Clyde Bellecourt and Yvonne Swann.
10:30 am Press Conference – Light Breakfast
11:00 am Panel on regional reports; and state of the nation.
12:00 pm Lunch (provided by H.O.M.E.Y.) Short film on AIM.
1:00 pm Panel on Treaties and Agreements Ratified and unratified; Federally Recognized, Unrecognized/Disenrollment
2:45 pm Break
3: pm Panel on Health issues, Diabetes, obesity; (Film ) “Food Security and Sustainability” and MLPA
5:00 pm Panel Status on Implementation of “UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples” Solidarity with International relationships & UN activities
*location subject to change check website: http://www.aimwest.info/
For additional information telephone 415-577-1492
Tuesday, November 23rd, 10:00AM – 6:00PM
Again at Mission Campus 1125 Valencia Street*
10:15 am Panel on freedom of religion, sacred sites, Bloody Island, NAGPRA
Mineral Resources and Mining Extraction-Mother Earth under attack
12:00 pm Lunch. Film: “Poison Wind”
1:20 pm Panel on migration/immigration and border issues
Prisoner rights and strategy for Leonard Peltier’ Executive Clemency
2:45 pm Break
3:00 pm AIM women support network
Leadership and panel discussion led by Yvonne Swan and with Corine Fairbanks; General discussion, open for comments
4:00 pm Providing basic support
Building AIM chapters/affiliates/defining role of support groups
5:00 pm Discussion on & revisit position on electoral, registration and voting process.
Wednesday, November 24th, 10:00AM – 6:00PM
Bahai Center, 170 Valencia, SF (near 16th BART Station*
10:00 am Preparations
Volunteers for turkey dinner are welcome, cooked turkeys being prepared, arrangement of kitchen
12:00 pm CEREMONY & FEAST
Beginning of a special program. “”The Eagle invites the Condor”. With 2012 Mayan prophesy and solidarity speaker. Special invited guest Clyde Bellecourt, National Speaker , and drummers and singers, with dance & musical performances.
1:45 pm “Unthanksgiving” Potluck dinner & Film “Reclaiming Their Voices: The Native American Vote in New Mexico & Beyond” Plus Q&A
5:00 pm Panel on cultural and spiritual and youth development. Institutional racism and mascots.
Thursday, November 25th, 4:00AM – 9:00AM
Alcatraz Island Annual Sunrise Gathering! AIM Conferees welcomed all day to visit the Bay Area community!
Leaving from Hornblower Tours at Pier #31
For advance tickets call (415)981-7625 or visit www.alcatrazcruises.com/website/pprog-upcoming-events.aspx
Friday, November 26th, 12:00PM – 12:00AM
*ALSO* Black Friday Emeryville Protest
For additional information on this day call:
Corrine Gould 510-575-8408
Meanwhile at Mission Campus*...
12:00 pm Lunch & Film: “The Fifth Gate” with late great, Floyd Red Crow Westerman.
1:00 pm Discussion on Climate Change
COP-16; devise strategy with environmentalists, allies and coalition building to contribute toward Cancun Mexico, based on the Bolivian Mother Earth Declaration April 2010
3:00 pm Break
3:15 pm Seek solutions to affects of REDD
Developing strategies to challenge REDD advocates; Social movements, coalition building vs. corporations.
5:00 pm Closing General Assembly
5:45 pm Closing Ceremony and Announcements
And Later...
At the Bahai Center, 170 Valencia Street, SF*
Doors open 6:00pm “NATIVE AMERICAN DAY” Concert with poets, Dr. Loco, local artists, hip-hop, youth band “Savage” and “The Bob Young Project”, raffle, refreshments, and vendors. Tickets $7-10 donation, slide scale, support your local AIM!!
Also for housing call: Benny @ 415-200-6591 and Felipe @ 925-219-2303
Volunteer Coordinator - Laura (415) 410 8475

Saturday, November 20, 2010

Watch Video: Southern Border Indigenous Roundtable

Watch webcast: Southern Border Indigenous Peoples Roundtable Symposium
Indigenous Alliance without Borders, 3 hours: http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/10935828
Jose Matus, Yaqui director of the Alliance; Kat Rodriguez of Derechos Humanos; Julian Rivas, O'odham from Mexico; Shannon Rivers, O'otham from Gila River and Sarah Gonzales, director of the YWCA Racial Justice Program. Recorded by Earthcycles www.earthcycles.net and Censored News www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com

Lehman Brightman: The Real History of the Occupation of Alcatraz

By Lehman Brightman, founder of United Native Americans
Photo: Harold Patty & Oohosis Wearing UNA "Indian Power" Buttons. Yet, Some People Whom Have Published These Picture's In Books Such as "You Are On Indian Land Alcatraz Island, 1969-1971 Edited By Troy R. Johnson, Seem To Over Look This. . . Why? .. Indian occupiers moments after the removal from Alcatraz Island on June 11, 1971. They are (from left): Harold Patty, a Paiute from Nevada; Oohosis, a Cree from Canada; Peggy Lee Ellenwood, a Sioux from Wolf Point, Montana; Sandy Berger, from Fort Hall, Idah © Ilka Hartmann 2009 http://www.ilkahartmann.com/
Read more and watch videos of the 1969 Occupation of Alcatraz:
http://censored-news.blogspot.com/2010/11/lehman-brightman-real-history-of.html

AIM: US Celebrates Massacre on Thanksgiving

42nd Anniversary of AIM
Nov. 22 -- 26: Schedule and info:
http://aimwest.info/
Broadcast live on Earthcycles:
http://www.earthcycles.net/

By Tony Gonzales, AIM West
People still can’t fathom the facts behind this day and how US society depicts, and perpetuates the myth about sitting down at the dinner table in solidarity with Indians having survived the hardships, and harvest! Another attempt at making fools of us by leaving out ‘the rest of the story’ and how our kids are subjected to this wholesale propaganda and living a lie!
The late, great Bill Wahpepah (AIM) started celebrating sunrise gatherings at Alcatraz Island circa 1974, to shatter these myths, besides honoring the Alcatraz Warriors who occupied the Rock for 19 months, and a community dinner, he dubbed, an extension of his humor “unthanksgiving” to give people a starting jolt!
Y’all have a good one now! Oh, and make plans to join us for the annual 'unthanksgiving' dinner, the 'Eagle invites the Condor' to dinner, November 24th, check our website for schedule!
ORIGINS OF THANKSGIVING
The year was 1637 ... 700 men, women and children of the Pequot Tribe, gathered for their "Annual Green Corn Dance" in the area that is now known as Groton, Conn. While they were gathered in this place of meeting, they were surrounded and attacked by mercenaries of the English and Dutch. The Indians were ordered from the building and as they came forth, they were shot down. The rest were burned alive in the building. The next day, the Governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony declared : "A day of Thanksgiving, thanking God that they had eliminated over 700 men, women and children. For the next 100 years, every "Thanksgiving Day" ordained by a Governor or President was to honor that victory, thanking God that the battle had been won. Newell based his research on studies of Holland Documents and the 13 volume Colonial Documentary History, both thick sets of letters and reports from colonial officials to their superiors and the king in England, and the private papers of Sir William Johnson, British Indian agent for the New York colony for 30 years in the mid-1600s. "My research is authentic because it is documentary," Newell said. "You can't get anything more accurate than that because it is first hand. It is not hearsay." Newell said the next 100 Thanksgivings commemorated the killing of the Indians at what is now Groton, Connecticut [home of a nuclear submarine base] rather than a celebration with them. He said the image of Indians and Pilgrims sitting around a large table to celebrate Thanksgiving Day was "fictitious" although Indians did share food with the first settlers.
Source: Documents of Holland, 13 Volume Colonial Documentary. History, letters and reports from colonial officials to their superiors and the King in England and the private papers of Sir William Johnson, Britsh Indian agent for the New York colony for 30 years. Researched by William B. Newell (Penobscot Tribe) Former Chairman of the University of Connecticut Anthropology Department.

VIDEO Mohawks Uphold Sovereign Waters: Eagle Bowl Treaty

Video link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B3vYl6ki2I8

Friday, November 19, 2010

Border Racism Targets People of Color

By Brenda Norrell
Censored News
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com
Photo: Kat Rodriguez, Julian Rivas and Shannon Rivers/Photo Brenda Norrell
.
By Brenda Norrell
Censored News
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com

TUCSON -- The Indigenous Alliance without Borders hosted a Southern Border Indigenous Peoples Roundtable Symposium Thurs., Nov. 18. The panel focused on the political climate and racism in Arizona and how this affects Indigenous Peoples.

Sponsored by the Indigenous Alliance without Borders/Alianza Indigena sin Fronteras, the panel was broadcast live by Earthcycles and Censored News. It is now available online.

Julian Rivas, Tohono O‘odham in Mexico, said he was stopped by Border Patrol, with search dogs, three times on his way here. “We say we are Tohono O’odham, but that doesn’t matter. It is the color of your skin.”
“I feel safer in Mexico than here.”

Rivas said he sits at the table with the Zapatistas in Chiapas, pushing for human rights. He said Zapatistas understand the need to push for the true return of traditional rights in their homelands.

Speaking on the oppression at the border, Rivas said during the panel today, “Homeland Security is labeling everyone as terrorists.”

“The tribe on this side has not said anything on our behalf,” Rivas said, referring to the Tohono O’odham Nation in Sells, Arizona. Rivas said the Tohono O'odham elected leaders are not promoting human rights, but are instead controlled by the BIA's strings.

Rivas’ talk was preceded by Shannon Rivers, Gila River Indian Community, who spoke on the need for the US to adopt the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Rivers said Native Americans should press the US to fully adopt the Declaration, as opposed to “endorsing” it the way Canada did. Although Canada endorsed the Declaration, Canada endorsed it only to the extent of existing laws. The Declaration includes upholding ancestral homelands and “free and prior consent.”

Rivers said Native people are asked to make cultural gestures, even "bless" fast food restaurants, but are not invited to the table by policy makers. Rivers urged Indian people to halt with the cultural gestures which are continuing the colonization and genocide.

Jose Matus, director of the Indigenous Alliance without Borders, organizer of the event, said traditional leaders should be recognized by the US government. Matus is a ceremonial leader responsible for bringing Yaqui ceremonial leaders across the border for the purpose of conducting ceremonies. Matus deals constantly with the issues of border crossing, the high cost of visas and border immigration agents.

Matus said all people need to come together to protect the spiritual and cultural rights of Indigenous Peoples and to assist in the battle for civil rights in the face of racism.

Kat Rodriguez of Derechos Humanos said Arizona is now known as the most racist state in the United States, but this is nothing new. Arizona has a long history of abuse of migrants, with a long history of the presence of Minutemen and other groups.

Referring to the anti-migrant climate in Arizona, Rodriguez said, “We are looking at this as an attack on our children and an attack on our future.”

Derechos Humanos is now assisting with the recovery of remains. Now primarily, Pima County recovers remains, because the majority of migrant bodies are reduced to remains by the weather and animals.

“You’re not finding bodies, you are finding remains,” Rodriguez said, describing the sad details of searching for clues to finding missing relatives for loved ones back home in Mexico.

She said there are many people dying in Mexico that no one hears about.

“Many of the people are Indigenous Peoples from Indigenous communities,” she said of the increase in migrants from Guatemala, Oaxaca and Chiapas. She said Spanish is not their first language and most are farmers, who have spent their lives growing their own food.

Rodriguez said people should have the right to remain in their homeland, not forced out because of trade policies, economic policies, hunger and violence.

“People have a right to survive in their home communities.”

Rodriguez said too often only an urn of ashes can be returned to families in Mexico. “Even the dead have rights.”

She said it is not by chance that so many migrants are dying in the Sonoran Desert of southern Arizona. The US has funneled migrants into Arizona intentionally and by US policy.

Migrants are people who have no voice.

“Who is going to advocate for them? This is a human rights crisis. Thousands of people have died.”

Rodriguez said it is too often misrepresented.

“Immigration is not a problem, it is an issue. It is an issue we have not dealt with.”

"What Arizona is dealing with are the effects: racism, xenophobia and death," she said.

Sarah Gonzales, Racial Justice Director at the YMCA, championed the youths who are taking on the struggle against racism in their communities. At the YWCA, programs focus on the elimination of racism.

Gonzales described the racism and trauma that local youths are dealing with.

Vicarious trauma is the trauma felt by youths who live with the daily reality that a family member might be deported, or in detention. Young people and their families are living with anxiety and trauma, some fearing leaving their homes. One doctor termed it, “the pre-deportation syndrome.”

She said youths are stepping up and organizing protests. Many are suffering for the first time the racism stemming from new legislation, such as Arizona SB 1070. Some are experiencing for the first time being spit on.

Artforms are now a focus for the frustration at the YWCA, where youths talk about SB 1070 and how it impacts them. Youths are producing videos, recycling sculpture and using slam poetry as outlets for the frustration.

“Slam poetry is born out of emotion,” Gonzales said. “It resonates with them.” During recent programs, youths came to believe that as young people, they have something to say.

The art expressions led to a platform where youths could vocalize their feelings. Congressman Raul Grijalva was among those who came and listened.

Gonzales said legislation, media and personal experiences are playing a role in shaping youths and their voices.

“There is a lot of power in the youth voice,“ Gonzales said.

Tohono O'odham in the audience pointed out their struggle with the elected Tohono O'odham government as they struggle to maintain the sacred Baboquivari Mountain.

Columnist and professor Roberto Rodriguez thanked the panel and pointed out that Indigenous Peoples have not been the focus of policy makers on immigration. Rodriguez also pointed out that "most of the experts on Arizona are not from Arizona."

One O'otham from Gila River in the audience said the US-established tribal governments are there to "divide and conquer," established by corporations. She said it is time to charge the tribal governments with fraud and exploitation of the culture and resources.

Background

The Indigenous Alliance without Borders/Alianza Indigena sin Fronteras has spent the past 13 years documenting abuses of Indigenous Peoples at the US/Mexico border.

The Alliance said, "For over a decade the Indigenous Alliance Without Borders has worked to be an international voice for traditional southern borderland indigenous peoples. The Indigenous Alliance promotes respect for indigenous rights, border rites of passage and recognition of our indigenous relative’s cultural affiliation with Southern Border Indigenous Nations from California, Arizona and Texas. To ease border crossings for all indigenous peoples residing in Mexico to attend ceremonies, social events and visit family."

"For more than two centuries indigenous peoples have inhabited the southern border long before the establishment of the U.S. and Mexico Nations. Indigenous peoples have been impacted by policies set in the far off capitals of these two nations, but have continued to maintained their cultures and social networks despite these bad government policies indigenous peoples continue to maintain their way of life and address their every day needs; We have continued to maintain our ancient indigenous cultures and social networks within our traditional homelands now divided by the U.S. – Mexico international boundary.

"Since 1990, our Indigenous brothers and sisters have been faced with legislation and restrictive border enforcement policies, militarization/border wall, heavy migrant and undocumented traffic, environmental destruction of indigenous borderlands, ceremonial grounds, and sacred sites. We need to educate and inform the general community on border indigenous concerns affecting the southern border indigenous peoples."

Topics include:
•Recent Changes to U.S. Immigration & Border Policies could erode or affirm indigenous peoples rights to maintain their cultural connections across the U.S. – Mexico border;
•Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative does not apply to Indigenous Mexican nationals who are culturally affiliated by blood relative, language, ceremonies and traditions
•Affects of Racism and negative political climate in Arizona on indigenous communities
•Potential Regulatory Solutions and Strategies to promote Southern Indigenous Rights and Justice.

WATCH: Southern Border Roundtable online:
http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/10935828
READ: Rivers: Border Rights and the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2010/11/rivers-border-rights-and-declaration-on.html
LISTEN: Censored News Blogtalk Radio
60 minute segment includes Shannon Rivers, Julian Rivas and O'odham audience comments:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/btrplayer.swf?file=http://www.blogtalkradio.com/brenda-norrell/play_list.xml?itemcount=5&autostart=fals
Listen: Amanda Shauder's 30 Minutes, KXCI Tucson, Jose Matus and Sarah Gonzales at the Border Roundtable:
http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/kxci/.artsmain/article/14/218/1728324/KXCI.Public.Affairs/30.Minutes-.Southern.Border.Indigenous.People%27s.Round.Table

Straightjacket: Navajo President Completes Water Rights Coup

Navajo Water Rights Groups Respond to President’s Water Settlement Signoff

By Dine Water Rights
Photos: Navajo water rights marches by Dine' Water Rights
Navajo Nation President Joe Shirley, Jr., has signed the Northeastern Arizona Water Rights Settlement, now making complete the coup, or outside takeover, of the three branches of our government. That settlement minimizes our rights, constrains us like a straightjacket, and puts us farther on the road to complete suppression.
“Great nations like great men should keep their word.” This famous sentence was written by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black, in his dissent in the 1960 case of Federal Power Commission v. Tuscarora Indian Nation. He was distressed that the majority of the Court betrayed both the Tuscarora’s trust and the honor of the United States by allowing the violation of treaties with the Tribe and the flooding of their reservation. That is how we feel today; distressed and violated by our own Council and President, who have dishonored the People’s trust and the oaths they took to uphold the promises of our Treaties.
Like tribes of old, our government has been infiltrated by representatives of outside interests who completely control the information received and decisions made by our central government leaders, while, at the same times, excluding the People from access to their own government. Worst among these infiltrators is long-time water lawyer Stanley Pollack. (You can “google” the 2008 article “Navajo Water Rights: Truths and Betrayals” for some of the deceptions, falsehoods, misrepresentations, etc., Pollack has perpetrated against our People) This kind of thing is not new to tribes in modern times. For example, our neighboring tribes, the Hopis, were, for decades, duped and subverted by their late and mistakenly trusted lawyer, John Boyden, who secretly sold them out to corporate and state interests. They were able to confirm this only after his death. (See the book “Fire on the Plateau” by renowned federal Indian law professor Charles Wilkinson.)
While state and corporate interests refer to Stanley Pollack as the best lawyer they ever had, our naïve, deceived, and self-interested leaders, the majority of whom are now under criminal indictment for misappropriation of funds, merrily follow his every whim—like domesticated animals down to the watering hole.
We are reminded of two great Indian country leaders of the Lakota People, Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull, who were betrayed and slain by members of their own tribe who conspired with government agents. That kind of betrayal is what has happened to us, from our Council and President, as orchestrated by Pollack and his henchmen and women.
It is now left solely up to the Navajo People to try and dig ourselves out of this quagmire of treachery, disloyalty, and internal abuse that President Shirley and the Council have aided outside interests with--in oppressing the Navajo people. This is one of the saddest chapters in our history. To the 51 council delegates and President Shirley, your legacy will be forever remembered as the ones who gave up our precious water rights to outsiders, in 2010.
As advocates for our people, we will also exercise our Treaty rights, which are the People’s, in our fight to reverse this injustice and to put into motion steps to banish this bad man, Pollack, from our Reservation.
Submitted by members of Dine’ Waters Rights
Contact information:
Kim Smith, 505-573-8171, missindigenous@gmail.com

Ronald Milford, 928-606-0787, haskan1990@yahoo.com

Adella Begaye, 928-349-0381, alleda.kay@gmail.com

http://www.dinewaterrights.org/ Water is Life! Protect our Future!

Thursday, November 18, 2010

Rivers: Border Rights and the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

By Brenda Norrell
Censored News
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com
Photo: Shannon Rivers speaks with Angie Ramon at the Border Roundtable/Photo Brenda Norrell.
Watch this presentation: http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/10935828

TUCSON -- Shannon Rivers, O’odham from the Gila River Indian Community, discussed the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, during the Southern Border Indigenous Peoples Roundtable Symposium.

“As of today, the United States has not endorsed the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples," said Rivers, who serves as Global Indigenous Peoples Caucus Co-chair on the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues.

Rivers pointed out that the US is now the only country in the world failing to act on the Declaration. The border panel, sponsored by the Indigenous Alliance without Borders on Nov. 18, is now available on the web at Earthcycles and Censored News.

Speaking on Indigenous Peoples border rights, Rivers pointed out that Article 36 of the UN Declaration states: “Indigenous peoples, in particular those divided by international borders, have the right to maintain and develop contacts, relations and cooperation, including activities for spiritual, cultural, political, economic and social purposes, with their own members as well as other peoples across borders.”

In 2007, the United Nations adopted the Declaration. However, four countries did not: the US, Canada, New Zealand and Australia. New Zealand and Australia later moved to adopt the Declaration. Although Canada endorsed the Declaration in November, it was a provisional endorsement.

Rather than adopt the Declaration, Canada endorsed it. Rivers said Canada maintains that it has jurisdiction over Indigenous Peoples and they are subject to the laws of Canada.

“That brings into question the right of self determination, the rights of economic development, the rights of trade, right of free trade and the right of free and prior consent," Rivers said of Canada's conditional endorsement.

The US is currently reviewing the Declaration. Currently at issue is whether the United States and Canada will continue to dictate to Indigenous Nations, he said.

“The Declaration is a non-legal binding document. What that means is it has no legal teeth,” Rivers said. He said there are many policies, such as the American Indian Religious Freedom Act, Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, and others, that American Indians still are struggling to have the United States act upon and enforce.

Although NAGPRA was established, Native people still have funeral and sacred items, items of spiritual and cultural significance, that have not been returned. He said museums around the world took items from Indigenous communities and medicine people, at a time when no laws were in place to prevent this vandalism and theft.

“We need those items returned,” Rivers said.

Native Americans know the return of these items can bring about healing and assist people who are suffering because of the loss of these items. The return of human remains, and proper burial, is high on the priority of Indigenous Peoples.

Because NAGPRA has not been fully enforced, Native people have suffered.

Rivers said what is at stake is self-determination, cultural issues, economic development and border issues. Since 9/11, various laws have been created that waive tribal, state and federal laws, including laws to erect a wall that not only impacts Indigenous Peoples, but the environment.

The border wall impacts traditional ceremonies, because traditional people gather plants in the region for traditional ceremonies.

During the panel presentation, Rivers pointed out that Native people are asked to make cultural gestures, even "bless" fast food restaurants, but are not invited to the table by policy makers. Rivers said Indigenous Peoples are asked to "bless" fast food places such as MacDonalds which engage in practices that violate the rights of Indigenous Peoples.

"Too often Indigenous Peoples are sought out to conduct cultural gestures: Blessings of restaurants and casinos and photo ops at state, county and national events. But when it comes to making real changes and true and frank discussions about serious issues, Indigenous Peoples are rarely invited to the table," he said.

Rivers urged Indian people to halt the cultural gestures, which continue colonization and genocide.

Meanwhile, in Canada, the government released this statement when it endorsed the Declaration, minimizing the impact of the Declaration:
"The Declaration is an aspirational document which speaks to the individual and collective rights of Indigenous peoples, taking into account their specific cultural, social and economic circumstances. Although the Declaration is a non-legally binding document that does not reflect customary international law nor change Canadian laws, our endorsement gives us the opportunity to reiterate our commitment to continue working in partnership with Aboriginal peoples in creating a better Canada."

Rivers pointed out that Border rights are among those stated in the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Article 36
1. Indigenous peoples, in particular those divided by international borders, have the right to maintain and develop contacts, relations and cooperation, including activities for spiritual, cultural, political, economic and social purposes, with their own members as well as other peoples across borders.
2. States, in consultation and cooperation with indigenous peoples, shall take effective measures to facilitate the exercise and ensure the implementation of this right.
Read more:
UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
http://www.un.org/esa/socdev/unpfii/en/drip.html
Indigenous Border Roundtable Panel reveals racism in Arizona, violations of Native rights
http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2010/11/live-now-southern-border-indigenous.html
Also watch: Tohono O'odham Angie Ramon 'My son was killed by the US Border Patrol'
http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2010/11/tohono-oodham-angie-ramon-my-son-was.html

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