Sunday, July 31, 2011

Photo Run/Walk Protecting Mother Earth North Dakota

By Brenda Norrell
Censored News
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com

The new generation of Eco Warriors at the Indigenous Environmental Network's Protecting Mother Earth Gathering, in the land of the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara, in New Town, North Dakota. A fun run/walk begins the fourth and final day of the gathering on Sunday, July 31, 2011. Indigenous Peoples from as far away as the Dene' in Canada to the Dine' in Arizona, joined Mayan from Guatemala and Wixakari (Huicholes) from Mexico, to protect Mother Earth from uranium mining, coal-fired power plants, toxic waste dumps, the scam of carbon credits, and other destructive corporate attacks on Indian lands. Here in the land of the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara, oil and gas wells are devastating the land and air.
Listen live today until noon:
Earthcycles
http://www.earthcycles.net

Friday, July 29, 2011

Chief Looking Horse speaks at Protecting Mother Earth Gathering

Chief Arvol Looking Horse urges return to spritual ways for survival


Listen to internet radio with Brenda Norrell on Blog Talk Radio
Listen to 30 minutes of Chief Arvol Looking Horse's talk on Blogtalk
By Brenda Norrell
Censored News
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com
Photo: Ponca Casey Camp and Chief Arvol Looking Horse at the IEN Gathering. Photo Brenda Norrell.
NEW TOWN, N.D. -- Chief Arvol Looking Horse, Cheyenne River Lakota, delivered a powerful address to the 16th Indigenous Environmental Network's Protecting Mother Earth Conference, as it opened its four day conference on Thursday, on the land of the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nations. The land of the Three Affiliated Tribes is now being destroyed by massive oil and gas wells.
Chief Looking Horse is the 19th Generation Keeper of the Sacred White Buffalo Calf Pipe Bundle of the Lakota Dakota Nakota Oyate. Chief Looking Horse spoke of his own early days and the guidance he was given for spiritual leaders. Although it is now a time of ceremonies for the Lakota Dakota Nakota Oyate, he said he came here to speak because of the importance.
“When I was young, we had no cancer or diabetes, and people kept their word. When they said they were going to do something, they kept their word. Today, the leadership is not good. People are speaking out of hurt and pain.”
Chief Looking Horse spoke of the pain and suffering of the people and of Mother Earth. While speaking of this difficult time, he shared his vision that the people, with the help of the Canupa, Sacred Pipe, and a return to a spiritual way of life, will make it through.
“We know that Grandmother Earth is sick right now," Chief Looking Horse told those gathered from as far away as Guatemala, Mexico, Canada and Alaska. "Today is a very important day.”
Chief Looking Horse said many people, including scientists see that the people are at the point of no return.
“Our ways are about dreams and visions."
Chief Looking Horse was joined on the panel presentation at the Four Bears Campground by Casey Camp, Ponca traditional Drumkeeper for the Ponca Pa-tha-ta, Woman's Scalp Society. Mayan Spiritual Representative Tata Cecilio Tuyuc Sucuc from Guatemala spoke of the prophecies and survival in this age.
Onondaga Faithkeeper Oren Lyons joined the gathering by telephone. "The prophecies are no longer in the future, the prophecies are with us here now," he said.
"We all operate under the same laws of nature," he said, pointing out this includes the two leggeds, four leggeds, winged ones and other life forms. "All need clean air, oxygen, to breathe."
Lyons said that human beings are largely water and the need for it is great.
"There is a responsibility for having so much water, it is to protect it." Lyons also spoke of the melting ice in the Arctic and how industrialized nations are responsible, because of the burning of fossil fuels. Pointing out the lifestyles of accumulation of some, he said this accumulation has caused changes in the atmosphere and global warming.
Lyons said that all human beings are related. “We are all the same, all around the world.”
At sunrise on Thursday, Western Shoshone Chet Stevens brought the fire from the 15th Indigenous Environmental Network's Protecting Mother Earth Gathering to the land of the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nations.
Hidatsa Scott Baker accepted the Fire from the Western Shoshone and lit the Sacred Fire for the 16th IEN Gathering. Spiritual Representative of the Mayans Tata Cecilio Tuyuc Sucuc from Guatemala was present at the Sacred Fire. Huicholes struggling to protect sacred lands in Mexico were also present, as a caravan of Native Americans arrived from the west. Tom Goldtooth, Dine' and Dakota, IEN executive director, welcomed those gathered and provided background on the Sacred Fire.
Indigenous Peoples here are struggling to protect their lands from uranium mining, coal fired power plants, oil and gas drilling, silver mining, toxic waste dumps and other destruction. Straw bale construction and alternative energy presentations were on the agenda.
The land of the Three Affiliated Tribes here -- Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nations -- has been hard hit by oil and gas drilling. Indigenous Peoples arriving at the gathering drove through highways heavily-congested with trucks and dust, with gas flaring and the air clogged with pollution, as the land was poisoned and destroyed by massive oil and gas wells.
Kandi Mossett, Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara, spoke of the deaths and destruction from the oil and gas mining here, where 3,000 oil and gas wells are now planned. Tearfully, Mossett spoke of the deaths, including the death of a close friend from cancer.
"We really, really appreciate you coming," Mossett told the gathering.
Marilyn Hudson, Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara historian, shared the history of the peoples here. "Welcome to the banks of the river," Hudson said, echoing the words of friendship that have been spoken here for thousands and thousands of years.
Hudson said the people gathered here, who are concerned about their air, water and land, are like the original peoples here. She said if the people camping, close to the land, listen they can hear the voices of the land, and maybe the echoes of those who have gone before.
The IEN Conference is being broadcast live Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Listen live at Earthcycles http://www.earthcycles.net More information at http://www.ienearth.org Photos and updates at Censored News http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com
Topics include: Dirty oil from the Tar Sands; Shale and pipeline spider webs; Offshore oil in Alaska and Gulf Coast; Biomass, agrofuel, waste to energy incinerations; Uranium, mining and nuclear energy; Coal; Fracking for oil and natural gas development and renewable energy.
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This article may not be republished without permission. For permission to repost or publish, contact brendanorrell@gmail.com
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Thursday, July 28, 2011

Protecting Mother Earth Gathering North Dakota 2011

 

Welcome to the 16th Protecting Mother Earth Gathering
Water, Energy, Climate and the Importance of Health and Culture
July 28-31, 2011, New Town, North Dakota

By Brenda Norrell
Censored News
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com

NEWTOWN, N.D. -- Chief Arvol Looking Horse, Cheyenne River Lakota, and Dr. Edwin Benson, Mandan, join Tom Goldtooth, director of the Indigenous Environmental Network, to open the four-day Protecting Mother Earth Gathering today.
At sunrise, Western Shoshone Chet Stevens brought the fire from the 15th Indigenous Environmental Network's Protecting Mother Earth Gathering to the land of the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nations.
Hidatsa Scott Baker accepted the Fire from the Western Shoshone and lit the Sacred Fire for the 16th IEN Protecting Mother Earth Gathering. Spiritual Representative of the Mayans Tata Cecilio Tuyuc Sucuc from Guatemala was present at the Sacred Fire. Huicholes struggling to protect sacred lands in Mexico were present, as a caravan of Native Americans arrived from the west.
Tom Goldtooth, Dine' and Dakota, IEN executive director, welcomed those gathered and provided background on the Sacred Fire and why it is lit.
"Chet Stevens brought the Fire with him and gave the Fire to Scott Baker of the Hidatsa Nation," Goldtooth said as the morning session began.
Traditional presenters today, Thursday, include Casey Camp, Ponca traditional Drumkeeper for the Ponca Pa-tha-ta, Woman's Scalp Society and Josephine Mandamin, Anishinabe Mother Earth Water Walker, Three Fires Midewiwin Society Society. Arvol Looking Horse, 19th Generation Keeper of the Sacred White Buffalo Calf Pipe Bundle of the Lakota Dakota Nakota Oyate is present.
Straw bale construction and alternative energy presentations are on the agenda for the first day of the four-day gathering. Tonight's highlights include a cultural program with traditional foods.
Indigenous Peoples from as far away as Gwich'in in Alaska, Dene' in Canada, Mayans in Guatemala and Huicholes in Mexico, arrived Thursday. Indigenous Peoples are struggling to protect their lands from uranium mining, coal fired power plants, oil and gas drilling, silver mining, toxic waste dumps and other destruction.

The land of the Three Affiliated Tribes here -- Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nations -- has been hard hit by oil and gas drilling in North Dakota. Indigenous Peoples arriving at the gathering drove through highways heavily-congested with trucks and dust, with gas flaring and the air clogged with pollution, as the land was poisoned and destroyed by massive oil and gas wells.
Kandi Mossett, Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara, spoke of the deaths and destruction from the oil and gas mining here, where 3,000 oil and gas wells are now planned. Tearfully, Mossett spoke of the deaths, including the death of a close friend from cancer.
"We really, really appreciate you coming," Mossett told the gathering.
Marilyn Hudson, Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara historian, shared the history of the peoples here. "Welcome to the banks of the river," Hudson said, echoing the words of friendship that have been spoken here for thousands and thousands of years.
Hudson said the people gathered here, concerned about their air, water and land, are like the original peoples here. She said if the people camping, close to the land, listen they can hear the voices of the land, and maybe the echoes of those who have gone before.
Goldtooth spoke on the origins of the Indigenous Environmental Network and how Indigenous Peoples have been impacted by colonization and the resulting uranium mining, oil and gas drilling, and other destruction to their lands.
Today's schedule: Thursday (Central Time Zone):
5:30 am Sunrise Ceremony: Lighting of the Sacred Fire -- The Fire coals from the previous gathering at Newe Sogobia (Western Shoshone) territories in Nevada are being brought in by the Fire Keeper of Newe Sogobia and will be given to the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nations. This Fire will be burning for the 4 days of the Gathering.
8 am: Live broadcast begins: http://www.earthcycles.net
9 am: Prayer by Edwin Benson, Mandan
Opening and welcome by IEN and the hosting members of the Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara Nations Organizing Committee
History of Fort Berthold and introduction to local environmental justice struggles and resiliency for survival
10 -- 10:45 Overview of the Indigenous Environmental Network: Report from World Peoples Conference on Climate Change in Cochabamba, Bolivia and the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
10:50 -- 11:30 am: Program Overview and Goals of the Gathering
11:30: Participants introductions to each other
12:30 -- 2 pm Demonstrations, Trainings and Activities
Straw bale housing and earth plaster demonstration
Passive solar energy demonstration
Telling your story: video training project
Creative direct action visuals; integrating art into your campaign strategy
Three Affiliated Tribes Museum Tour
Youth Activities
Listening Session: Environmental Justice Inter-agency Working Group chaired by the US EPA (to be confirmed)
2 pm -- 6 pm: Indigenous Traditional Knowledge, Original Instructions and Cultural Survival in this Time of Change
Youth and elder dialogue
Moderated by Casey Camp, Ponca traditional Drumkeeper for the Ponca Pa-tha-ta, Woman's Scalp Society
Josephine Mandamin, Anishinabe Mother Earth Water Walker, Three Fires Midewiwin Society Society
Arvol Looking Horse, 19th Generation Keeper of the Sacred White Buffalo Calf Pipe Bundle of the Lakota Dakota Nakota Oyate
Video message from Oren Lyons, Onondaga, Faithkeeper of the Turtle Clan, Six Nations
Message from Mayan elders
Thursday evening:
7:30 Traditional Cultural Night in the Earth Lodge Village
Youth and elder talking circles
Traditional games of plum game, double ball, arrow game and hand games
Traditional foods, healthy living and food sovereignty
Hoop Dance Performance
Live broadcast and gathering continues through Sunday at 2 pm

LISTEN LIVE TODAY: IEN Protecting Mother Earth July 28-31, 2011

The live broadcast concluded on July 31, 2011. During the first week of August 2011, the IEN Gathering will be broadcast on Crow Voices Radio in Montana. Check back at Censored News for times.
Sacred Fire begins IEN Gathering /Photo Brenda Norrell

Welcome to the 16th Protecting Mother Earth Gathering
Water, Energy, Climate and the Importance of Health and Culture
July 28-31, 2011, New Town, North Dakota

By Brenda Norrell
Censored News
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com

NEWTOWN, N.D. -- Chief Arvol Looking Horse, Cheyenne River Lakota, and Dr. Edwin Benson, Mandan, join Tom Goldtooth, director of the Indigenous Environmental Network, to open the four-day Protecting Mother Earth Gathering today.
At sunrise, Western Shoshone Chet Stevens brought the fire from the 15th Indigenous Environmental Network's Protecting Mother Earth Gathering to the land of the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nations.
Hidatsa Scott Baker accepted the Fire from the Western Shoshone and lit the Sacred Fire for the 16th IEN Protecting Mother Earth Gathering. Spiritual Representative of the Mayans Tata Cecilio Tuyuc Sucuc from Guatemala was present at the Sacred Fire. Huicholes struggling to protect sacred lands in Mexico were present, as a caravan of Native Americans arrived from the west.
Tom Goldtooth, Dine' and Dakota, IEN executive director, welcomed those gathered and provided background on the Sacred Fire and why it is lit.
"Chet Stevens brought the Fire with him and gave the Fire to Scott Baker of the Hidatsa Nation," Goldtooth said as the morning session began.
Traditional presenters today, Thursday, include Casey Camp, Ponca traditional Drumkeeper for the Ponca Pa-tha-ta, Woman's Scalp Society and Josephine Mandamin, Anishinabe Mother Earth Water Walker, Three Fires Midewiwin Society Society. Arvol Looking Horse, 19th Generation Keeper of the Sacred White Buffalo Calf Pipe Bundle of the Lakota Dakota Nakota Oyate is present.
Straw bale construction and alternative energy presentations are on the agenda for the first day of the four-day gathering. Tonight's highlights include a cultural program with traditional foods.
Indigenous Peoples from as far away as Gwich'in in Alaska, Dene' in Canada, Mayans in Guatemala and Huicholes in Mexico, arrived Thursday. Indigenous Peoples are struggling to protect their lands from uranium mining, coal fired power plants, oil and gas drilling, silver mining, toxic waste dumps and other destruction.

The land of the Three Affiliated Tribes here -- Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nations -- has been hard hit by oil and gas drilling in North Dakota. Indigenous Peoples arriving at the gathering drove through highways heavily-congested with trucks and dust, with gas flaring and the air clogged with pollution, as the land was poisoned and destroyed by massive oil and gas wells.
Kandi Mossett, Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara, spoke of the deaths and destruction from the oil and gas mining here, where 3,000 oil and gas wells are now planned. Tearfully, Mossett spoke of the deaths, including the death of a close friend from cancer.
"We really, really appreciate you coming," Mossett told the gathering.
Marilyn Hudson, Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara historian, shared the history of the peoples here. "Welcome to the banks of the river," Hudson said, echoing the words of friendship that have been spoken here for thousands and thousands of years.
Hudson said the people gathered here, concerned about their air, water and land, are like the original peoples here. She said if the people camping, close to the land, listen they can hear the voices of the land, and maybe the echoes of those who have gone before.
Goldtooth spoke on the origins of the Indigenous Environmental Network and how Indigenous Peoples have been impacted by colonization and the resulting uranium mining, oil and gas drilling, and other destruction to their lands.
Today's schedule: Thursday (Central Time Zone):
5:30 am Sunrise Ceremony: Lighting of the Sacred Fire -- The Fire coals from the previous gathering at Newe Sogobia (Western Shoshone) territories in Nevada are being brought in by the Fire Keeper of Newe Sogobia and will be given to the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nations. This Fire will be burning for the 4 days of the Gathering.
8 am: Live broadcast begins: http://www.earthcycles.net
9 am: Prayer by Edwin Benson, Mandan
Opening and welcome by IEN and the hosting members of the Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara Nations Organizing Committee
History of Fort Berthold and introduction to local environmental justice struggles and resiliency for survival
10 -- 10:45 Overview of the Indigenous Environmental Network: Report from World Peoples Conference on Climate Change in Cochabamba, Bolivia and the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
10:50 -- 11:30 am: Program Overview and Goals of the Gathering
11:30: Participants introductions to each other
12:30 -- 2 pm Demonstrations, Trainings and Activities
Straw bale housing and earth plaster demonstration
Passive solar energy demonstration
Telling your story: video training project
Creative direct action visuals; integrating art into your campaign strategy
Three Affiliated Tribes Museum Tour
Youth Activities
Listening Session: Environmental Justice Inter-agency Working Group chaired by the US EPA (to be confirmed)
2 pm -- 6 pm: Indigenous Traditional Knowledge, Original Instructions and Cultural Survival in this Time of Change
Youth and elder dialogue
Moderated by Casey Camp, Ponca traditional Drumkeeper for the Ponca Pa-tha-ta, Woman's Scalp Society
Josephine Mandamin, Anishinabe Mother Earth Water Walker, Three Fires Midewiwin Society Society
Arvol Looking Horse, 19th Generation Keeper of the Sacred White Buffalo Calf Pipe Bundle of the Lakota Dakota Nakota Oyate
Video message from Oren Lyons, Onondaga, Faithkeeper of the Turtle Clan, Six Nations
Message from Mayan elders
Thursday evening:
7:30 Traditional Cultural Night in the Earth Lodge Village
Youth and elder talking circles
Traditional games of plum game, double ball, arrow game and hand games
Traditional foods, healthy living and food sovereignty
Hoop Dance Performance
Live broadcast and gathering continues through Sunday at 2 pm

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Indigenous Environmental Network gets ready for live broadcast at Three Affiliated Tribes

video

Indigenous Peoples arrive from the Americas for Protecting Mother Earth Conference

By Brenda Norrell
Censored News

NEW TOWN, N. D. -- Indigenous Peoples from the Americas are preparing for the Indigenous Environmental Network's Protecting Mother Earth Conference, Thursday through Sunday. Native Americans are arriving on the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nation in New Town, North Dakota.
Shown in this brief video, Earthcycles sets up a wind generator and solar panels, which is now providing power to the Earthcycles remote studio. (Click arrow above to watch brief video.)

Listen to the live broadcast -- with speakers, panel discussions and interviews, beginning at 8 am each morning and continuing through the evening: Thursday 8 am to 8 pm; Friday 8 am to 8 pm, Saturday; 8 am throughout the evening talent show and Sunday 8 am to 2 pm. To join the conversation on the Internet, e-mail: brendanorrell@gmail.com
Listen at 87.9 FM or on the web at Earthcycles http://www.earthcycles.net

16th Protecting Mother Earth Gathering


“Energy, Climate, Water and the Importance of Health and Culture.”

July 28 – 31, 2011
Four Bears Park/Little Shell Powwow Grounds
New Town, North Dakota
Hosted by Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara Nations Community Members
Click here to learn more and register online.

More information:
IEN: http://www.ienearth.org
Listen at: http://www.earthcycles.net
.

Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Arizona Lulzsec files: Operation Gunrunner weapons of choice

Lulzsec
Hacktivists expose Operation Gunrunner's weapons of choice

By Brenda Norrell
Censored News
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com

PHOENIX -- When the ATF Operation Gunrunner's Fast and Furious allowed weapons to "walk" into Mexico, supposedly as part of a sting operation, the weapons landed in the hands of drug cartels. Two US agents have been killed by these weapons, and an unknown number of people in Mexico.

When hacktivists Lulzsec exposed the Arizona Department of Public Safety files, they released from the bowels of these police files a report titled "ATF Southwest Border Strategy, Project Gunrunner Weapons of Choice." This report describes the weapons of choice, from pistols and rifles to AK47s.

So far, the Arizona media has failed to expose the contents of this report. The Arizona media has also missed other facts in these files, including a Tucson police chief candidate who was defined as a "stalker," in the files of the Fraternal Order of Police in Tucson. In Phoenix, the Fraternal Order of Police removed another police officer that is a sex offender.

In the hacked files of the Chinga La Migra releases, there is also the description of a roping ranch, where police go near Nogales. Arizona police were warned by the cartels, when they are at the ranch: When you're off duty, ignore drug running by the cartels.

While some of Arizona's media provided information on the heavily-armed off-duty US Marines patrolling the border, and stalking migrants, there was much more in these files. Arizona police described in one file a plan which was described to agents, to bring in heavily-armed mercenaries to Sasabe. Sasabe, located southwest of Tucson and alongside the Tohono O'odham Nation, has been heavily-trafficked by armed white supremacist patrols for many years.

In Tucson, where students are fighting the State of Arizona to save their ethnic studies programs, the files exposed a school cop reporting the diversity studies class to the Arizona Attorney General. Apparently the school cop didn't believe that Native Americans were the victims of genocide.

Meanwhile, it came as no surprise to people who live on the border that the US government was supplying assault weapons to the drug cartels in Mexico. Where else would they come from?

The report, ATF Southwest Border Strategy, Project Gunrunner Weapons of Choice, in 2008, states the weapons of choice were a variety of pistols, long guns and rifles. These guns included AK 47s, Romarm Romak rifles, Romaram WASR rifles, Poly Tech AKS rifles, AR-15 Type rifles, Bushmaster XM15 rifles, Colt Sporter rifles, Rock River Arms LAR-15 rifles, and others.

The agents killed with these weapons, placed in the hands of drug cartels were: Border Patrol agent Brian Terry, killed near Nogales, Arizona, and Immigration agent Jaime Zapata, killed in northern Mexico, south of Texas.

GUNRUNNER BACKGROUND: WIKIPEDIA
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Gunrunner
Controversy

ATF Project Gunrunner has a stated official objective to stop the sale and export of guns from the United States into Mexico in order to deny Mexican drug cartels the firearms considered "tools of the trade".[16] However, since September 2009 under Project Gunrunner, operation "Fast and Furious", did the opposite by ATF permitting, encouraging and facilitating 'straw purchase' firearm sales to traffickers, and allowing the guns to 'walk' and be transported to Mexico. This has resulted in the death of US border agent Brian Terry and considerable controversy.[17][18][19]
Senator Charles E. Grassley (R-IA) initiated an investigation with a letter to ATF on 27 January 2011,[20] and again on 31 January 2011. ATF responded through the Department of Justice by denying all allegations.[21] Senator Grassley responded with specific documentation supporting the allegations in letters to U.S. Attorney General Holder on 9 Feb 2011[22] and 16 Feb 2011.[23] ATF refused to answer specific questions in a formal briefing to Senator Grassley on 10 Feb 2011.
Indictments filed in federal court, documentation obtained by Senator Grassley, and statements of ATF agents obtained by Senator Grassley and CBS News, show that the ATF Phoenix Field Division allowed and facilitated the sale of over 2,500 firearms (AK-47 rifles, FN 5.7mm pistols, AK-47 pistols, and .50 caliber rifles) in 'straw man purchases' destined for Mexico. [17][24][25][26][27][28]According to ATF agents, Mexican officials were not notified, and ATF agents operating in Mexico were instructed not to alert Mexican authorities about the operation.[29] Some ATF agents and supervisors strongly objected, and gun dealers (who were cooperating with ATF) protested the sales, but were asked by ATF to complete the transactions to expose the supply chain and gather intelligence.[17][30] However, there are accusations that the ATF was attempting to boost statistics to 'prove' that American guns are arming the Mexican drug cartels and to further budget and political objectives.[31]
Many of these same guns are being recovered from crime scenes in Arizona[32] and throughout Mexico,[33] which is artificially inflating ATF's eTrace statistics of U.S. origin guns seized in Mexico. One specific gun, recovered at the scene, is alleged to be the weapon used to murder Customs and Border Protection Agent Brian Terry on December 14, 2010.[34]

Arizona: Living and dying 'Under Arpaio'


Living and dying under Arpaio
Censored News

TUCSON: Pan Left members Jason Michael Aragón and Mary Charlotte Thurtle have produced the documentary Under Arpaio that deals with the effect Sheriff Joe Arpaio has on Maricopa County, Arizona and the nation.
Under Arpaio
http://www.underarpaio.com/blog/
THE ISSUES:
Maricopa County, Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio has captured national attention in the press as the "Toughest Sheriff in America" for his Wild West persona, tough on crime stance, unorthodox law enforcement methods and an anti-immigrant posture. He has become famous in the media through antics such as forcing inmates to wear pink underwear, work on chain gangs, and live in tents. Lawsuits, racial profiling, corruption, wasted taxes, and civil rights investigations have become the norm for the Phoenix area due to Arpaio's methods. Under Arpaio is a documentary film that explores what it is really like for people in Arizona to live -and die, under Joe Arpaio.
Within this atmosphere of tension, Arizona has recently passed the law SB1070- the "papers please" policy- where anyone with brown skin becomes a target. However, before SB1070, Arpaio was enforcing immigration law by leading heavily armed raids against Latino communities in neighborhoods, fast food restaurants, elementary schools and low-income areas. At the same time that the Federal Government publicly sued Arizona over SB1070, the 287g program between Homeland Security and Arpaio had already been established years earlier which sanctioned the Sheriff's immigration enforcement activities and had become a spectacle toured rampant allegations of racial profiling.

The people of Arizona have had enough. There are those dedicated to raising awareness and ending the injustices. People such as, Michael Manning, a Phoenix area lawyer who successfully sued Arpaio five times for human rights violations in Arpaio's jails. Ryan Gabrielson, a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist who uncovered how Arpaio's tactics left neighborhoods unprotected from violent crime. Residents like Anderw Sanchez of the Yaqui town of Guadalupe and activists like Salvador Reza from Phoenix group Puente Movement who serve the communities Arpaio terrorizes by organizing people to the streets and documenting Arpaio's abuses along the way. Women like County Board Supervisor Mary Rose Wilcox who is a staunch critic of Arpaio and has been under threat of sheriff harassment, or activist Sandra Castro who dedicates her student life to organizing people to fight against the abuse. These and others from the Maricopa County area are highlighted and reveal the struggle to bring back humanity to their communities against a Sheriff that resembles more of an outlaw as the days go by in Arizona.

Monday, July 25, 2011

Wellknown Buffalo: New visions for Crow children



WELLKNOWN BUFFALO CROW NATION
Censored News
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com

On the Crow Nation at Wellknown Buffalo, in the valley of the Little Bighorn, the non-profit Center Pole, has a great new coffee shop with espresso, art classes and programs for Crow children, and even a Thrift Store.
Wellknown Buffalo is named after Peggy's grandmother who welcomed people here to water their horses and share food and water on their journeys. Wellknown Buffalo grew her own crops and was fiercely independent here, in the valley below the Little Bighorn. Today, Peggy Wellknown Buffalo has created this coffee shop, along with the children's programs and Thrift Store, carrying on in the spirit of her grandmother, welcoming humanity, with the special purpose of creating new visions for Crow children. The new Crow Voices Radio has just started, with technical help from Govinda at Earthcycles, and support from the Seventh Generation Fund. Already, local Crow are beginning radio programs. Thank you to all of you a special place and a grand spirit!
Read more about Center Pole: http://sites.google.com/site/thecenterpole/Home/about-us

Longest Walk 4 Return to Alcatraz 2012

Longest Walk 4 Return to Alcatraz

Photo copyright Ilka Hartmann
Press statement
The Longest Walk 4: Return to Alcatraz is being initiated by those on the original, The Longest Walk in 1978. It will begin on July 15th, 2012 in Washington D.C. and travel to Alcatraz on December 22, 2012. The purpose of this Walk will be to reaffirm the heart of Traditional Tribal Sovereignty rooted in Ceremony and land based spiritual relationships. We call on all Indigenous Peoples to come and support this Walk.

We have gone to Washington D.C. many times to seek justice, the protection of treaty rights, and the continuing existence of our Peoples and Ways of Life. They have had their opportunity. The time has come to reclaim for ourselves the prayers that have gone east and bring them back full circle to Alcatraz, the symbol of the modern assertion of what has been called the Red Power Movement. We Walk to educate our own Peoples on what Tribal Sovereignty means from an Indigenous Peoples way of life. We Walk to affirm to the world that we still continue as free and sovereign Peoples as we define it. We Walk to remind those of our Peoples engaged in dealing with the nation-states that tribal sovereignty is not defined by non-Indigenous laws, rules and regulations; nor by economic development, good governance, and corporate structures. These elements may be pragmatic, but they do not define us. We Walk with the spirits of our ancestors for the present and for the future generations so that we as Peoples do not forget what makes us Indigenous.

We also Walk to remind all peoples that Leonard Peltier and his continuing incarceration is symbolic of the continuing incarceration of all Indigenous Peoples in the policies and political structures of the colonial nation-states. The time has come for the release of Leonard Peltier based on principles of reconciliation. It seems strange and one sided that nation-states seek forgiveness for horrendous crimes against our Peoples such as massacres, land confiscations, the theft of our children to abusive boarding schools and such, yet can’t find a way to release a person who has served over 30 years in prison, for what happened during a time of conflict. Leonard Peltier should be freed on this principle of reconciliation regardless of what one may think in terms of justice, innocence or guilt.

As this Walk is about the spiritual foundations ofour sovereignty as talked about in The Longest Walk Manifesto of 1978, we also ask for elders and spiritual leaders to come and lend support and advice where possible. To this end we are also going to have a Spiritual Gathering at Cahokia Mounds in September, 2012.

For more information please contact Jimbo Simmons
jimbo.simmons@yahoo.com

Organizers said further info will be forthcoming and those wanting to help out and that fundraising will need to be sanctioned by reps from the Working Group.

MUSIC VIDEO O'odham's Shining Soul: 'Papers' Militarization of Border


SHINING SOUL MUSIC VIDEO "PAPERS"

WEBSITE: http://www.shiningsoul-music.blogspot.com/
DOWNLOAD AT: http://www.shiningsoulmusic.bandcamp.com
EMAIL: WORKWITHSHININGSOUL@GMAIL.COM

"The militarization of the U.S./Mexico border
has led only to cultural and environmental destruction
of the indigenous peoples whose land is on or near
the border, such as the O'odham, Yaqui
and Lipan Apache Nations.

Border Militarization brings death and terror
to indigenous peoples from other parts
of the continent migrating to this land.

The immigration struggle is also
an Indigenous struggle. '

NO BORDERS!
FREE MOVEMENT FOR ALL!"

MORE INFO PLEASE CHECK THESE SITES:
http://www.facebook.com/l/ZAQDrFLzOAQCAelDlL4wmAxklHT4d5IUTU49oQdUizRfpnA/oodhamsolidarity.blogspot.com
http://www.facebook.com/l/RAQALbGrzAQAjGR2YosfaYsMtPjsQbdM7bLQg68gOLIrDcA/www.solidarity-project.org
http://www.facebook.com/l/gAQBmGAjZAQAdgNiGUNhkQK57XjO2xSPgT-Jgivg_LIEgEA/survivalsolidarity.wordpress.com

http://www.facebook.com/l/MAQA5IlnqAQCseITTcTy59-5Hih8wOFsbM48ZE5zH8j63Yw/www.borderopposition.blogspot.com
http://www.facebook.com/l/WAQCOamD6AQB8g3VO2B5xwAhkCKuVuHgE1agYvyF86550Ow/lipanapachecommunitydefense.blogspot.com
http://www.facebook.com/l/sAQDr0b3VAQCRV67GT49_K6dt81PkYa1oQPAVRJ7eLLkyiQ/chaparralrespectsnoborders.blogspot.com

http://www.facebook.com/l/KAQDJvuzwAQDZ0Nd3PuE4N2qCa6Tqz8LBAFLWIS9vNyVDnQ/firesneverextinguished.blogspot.com

http://www.facebook.com/l/SAQBgXRo4AQDH25ouvsyJaXNKF8omMo9BtSELaLIxihi7Pg/sb1070resistance.blogspot.com

http://www.facebook.com/l/6AQDwTVRUAQD3ci9obG33qkeRNMQCv1DVG25QX0nocFH3lQ/www.taalahooghan.org

http://www.facebook.com/l/LAQCRhAG6AQCSCgJkXWczQ2wNkEDnJjxhDxEh0CXtxePU7g/dryriver.org

ABOUT SHINING SOUL:
Straight outta occupied O'odham jewed in southern Arizona, Shining Soul is a grassroots duo based in Phoenix. Shining Soul's unique vintage means of beat production, and down to earth, empowering rhyme delivery is reminiscent of Hip-Hop's early days, when beats and rhymes took priority. Using Hip-Hop as a tool to get their voices out, Shining Soul pushes the margins by discussion issues that affect the communities they each originate from, while sharing and maintaining the essence of Hip-Hop culture that empowered them to take up arms via beats and rhymes.
HIP HOP IS RESISTANCE:
As life-long admirers and now participants, Shining Soul, have greatly benefited from Hip Hop culture. From first hearing Blackstar's “Respiration” to Grandmaster Flash and Melle Mel's “The Message”, the seeds of Hip Hop were planted in our souls. We now want to share that essence and knowledge that inspired us to pick up the mic and sampler years ago.
In our journey, we use emceeing as a platform to speak about the struggles that our respective communities face. Border Militarization, the Criminalization of People of Color, Police Brutality and the Desecration of Sacred Places are our realities today.
In our efforts, we use Hip Hop as a tool to empower community, especially youth, by informing them of the issues via dope beats, dope rhymes, and by providing context of the struggles we face. We challenge them to take effective action in their communities using music and creativity as a weapon.
The element of rap allows us to speak. We hope our music, beat making projects and overall message that "Hip Hop is Resistance" inspires others to think critically of the world we live in, so we can challenge the imperialistic pillars that attack us everyday (Capitalism, Patriarchy, White Supremacy and Colonization), in hopes to appreciate and respect all the beauty and power that that originates from our dignified cultures.
This is why we are resisting.
That is why we fight.
So we can be who we are.
OUR existence is OUR resistance.
HIP HOP IS RESISTANCE
http://www.facebook.com/l/6AQDwTVRUAQDl2qSPCUOByZRaDy_tly5O1k3J7uaicbwRdQ/shiningsoul-music.blogspot.com

Sunday, July 24, 2011

In the land of Plenty Coups





On the Little Bighorn, in the land of Plenty Coups, on the land of Wellknown Buffalo
By Brenda Norrell
Censored News
Photos: Plenty Coups as as a young man, and as an older man with his autobiography. Courtesy photos. Photos 3 and 4 Plenty Coups early and later homes, by Brenda Norrell.
WELLKNOWN BUFFALO, Montana -- In the land of the Little Bighorn, on the ground called Wellknown Buffalo, we are at the new Crow Voices Radio. We're at the non-profit Centerpole, an inspiration to the Crow young people who come here, do their artwork, learn from new experiences, share their stories and feel the love.
Yesterday, we visited Plenty Coups State Park and saw the first, and later, homes of Chief Plenty Coups. When our Crow host was asked what Plenty Coups is most often remembered for, she shared his quote on education.
"Education is your greatest weapon. With education you are the white man's equal, without education you are his victim and so shall remain all of your lives. Study, learn, help one another always. Remember there is only poverty and misery in idleness and dreams -- but in work there is self respect and independence."
At the radio station, there's a coffee shop, with espresso, a teepee outside, with horses grazing, and our hosts have wrapped us in their warm hospitality. Centerpole: http://sites.google.com/site/thecenterpole
Stay with us on our journey as we travel to New Town, North Dakota, to broadcast the Indigenous Environmental Network Conference, July 28--31, 2011.
You'll be hearing live the broadcast by Crow Voices Radio and Earthcycles, with the latest breaking news of the efforts to halt the destruction and desecration of Mother Earth. You'll be hearing the voices of Navajos fighting coal mining and the draining of the aquifer on the Nation Nation and the efforts to halt the filthy Tar Sands by First Nations in Canada.
You'll be learning more about how uranium mining companies have targeted Indian country, from Navajoland to Lakota lands, and now threaten the drinking water of Native people. This comes after decades of poisoned water, disease and death from Cold War uranium mining. Further, from Western Shoshone to Goshute, the toxic and nuclear dumpers have set their sites on Indian people and their lands.
On the live broadcast, you'll hear the struggle to preserve the sacred mountains of the Wixáritari (Huicholes) in Mexico. You'll learn more about the local struggles of Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara in North Dakota to protect the earth from oil and gas drilling.
You'll also be hearing from international human rights activists and Indigenous spiritual leaders sharing their visions for future generations.
Join the efforts and become a part of the struggle for climate justice and the protection and healing of Mother Earth.
Crow Voice Radio
Earthcycles


16th Protecting Mother Earth Gathering


“Energy, Climate, Water and the Importance of Health and Culture.”


July 28 – 31, 2011
Four Bears Park/Little Shell Powwow Grounds
New Town, North Dakota
Hosted by Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara Nations Community Members
Click here to learn more and register online.

Friday, July 22, 2011

Doo'ko'oosliid Dine' youth film: Sacred San Francisco Peaks

Censored News: Most censored topics

The most censored, most popular, at Censored News
By Brenda Norrell
Censored News
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com
Photo: Remembering migrants by Brenda Norrell
The most accessed articles at Censored News for the past year expose unauthorized wiretaps on Mohawks; protesters locked down to protect San Francisco Peaks; US Marines patrolling the Arizona border stalking migrants, and a hate crime against Reno Sparks Indian Johnny Bonta and his family in Fernley, Nevada.
This week’s most popular article at Censored News exposes an oil spill into the Cutbank River on the Blackfeet Nation in Montana. Intrepid Blackfeet reporter Destini Vaile was the first to expose the spill and shared it with Censored News. The mainstream media then limped behind her report.
In breaking news, Indian country judges issued a combined declaratory judgment in support of traditional gathering rights in Tacoma, Washington. Citing the law that prohibits genocide and discrimination, Kuiu Kwaan Lead Judge Rudy James and Indian country judges issued the judgment in support of Northern Paiute Wesley Dick, Kwassuh. He was fined by the US Fish and Wildlife Service while gathering tules, cattails, in May.
The devastation of Peabody Coal on Black Mesa, and its impact on draining the region’s water supply, is exposed in a new report by Navajos and environmental organizations.
Read more at Censored News
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com

Most popular between 2010 and 2011:
Wikileaks: Canada’s unauthorized wiretaps of Mohawks:
http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2010/08/wikileaks-canadas-unauthorized-wiretaps.html

LOCKED DOWN: Protest halts snowbowl destruction on San Francisco Peaks
http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2011/06/locked-down-protest-halts-snowbowl.html

Hacked data reveals US Marines as contract killers on Arizona border
http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2011/06/hacked-data-reveals-us-marines-contract.html

Thursday, July 21, 2011

Navajos: Peabody Coal Mine Draining Region's Water Supply

New Report: Peabody's Black Mesa Coal Mine draining
region's water supply

By Black Mesa Water Coalition, Dine' CARE, To' Nizhoni Ani, Center for Biologial Diversity and Sierra Club
Photo by Leslie Mano Cockrum
July 20, 2011

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. -- A massive coal-mining facility on Black Mesa has a much more damaging effect to a vital local water supply, according to a new report released today. A hydrology study, prepared by Dr. Daniel Higgins (PhD in Arid Lands Resource Sciences from the University of Arizona) program demonstrates that after four decades of coal mine groundwater withdrawals, mine-related impacts to the Navajo Aquifer (N-aquifer) far exceed those that have been acknowledged or recognized by the Office of Surface Mining (OSM), the lead Regulatory

Authority for Peabody Coal’s massive mining facility on Black Mesa. The N-aquifer is an important source of water below Black Mesa that feeds sacred springs and is used by thousands as drinking water.

"Despite what these models predicted years ago, I think any reasonable person who looks at the

data would conclude that the rates of water level decline at Kayenta and spring discharge decline

at Moenkopi are directly related to Peabody's groundwater withdrawals,” said Higgins, who

studies the interactions of complex social-ecological systems and spent more than five years

investigating Black Mesa’s groundwater development – the focus of his dissertation research.

"This report reaffirms the fact that coal industry continues to materially damage our aquifer

with impunity," said Marshall Johnson of the Navajo grassroots organization, To’ Nizhoni Ani,

or
Beautiful Water Speaks. "The truth is that Peabody has yet to prove that the mine is not

damaging the aquifer and OSM has yet to hold Peabody accountable. Instead of addressing the

health of the aquifer, OSM works on creating new standards each time that have been exceeded

so for us, it's disappointing watching a federal agency deliberately sidestep its responsibilities."

Wahleah Johns of the Black Mesa Water Coalition said, “OSM should not award Peabody a

permit renewal until a thorough investigation is conducted on the findings of this report on the

N-Aquifer.”

“Dr. Higgins’ report comes at a critical time while OSM is preparing an Environmental

Assessment to analyze the impacts of the Kayenta Mine. OSM officials now need to address

and respond to this report before they let Peabody off the hook for damage to the Navajo

aquifer,” said Nicole Horseherder of To’ Nizhoni Ani and a Black Mesa resident where she

depends on the N-Aquifer for her home and ranch. “The Obama Administration needs to restore

environmental justice for local communities and hold Peabody accountable for damaging that

most basic human right—the right to drink in perpetuity pure, clean water.”

“We have known for a long time that water withdrawals have been impacting local springs and

wildlife but this report puts the burden on OSM to demonstrate to local communities why mine

operations should be allowed to continue,” said Taylor McKinnon of the Center for Biological

Diversity.

Higgins’ report was submitted by the OSM by Black Mesa Water Coalition, Dine CARE, To’

Nizhoni Ani, the Center for Biological Diversity and Sierra Club as a supplement to comments

previously submitted to the agency in 2010. OSM is preparing an Environmental Assessment

that will be available for public review in August of 2011. The groups have asked OSM to hold

a meeting within the next 30 days to discuss the report’s findings.

Contacts:

Daniel Higgins, PhD, 520-243-9450

Wahleah Johns, Black Mesa Water Coalition, 928-637-5281

Andy Bessler, Sierra Club, 928-774-6103

Anna Frazier, Dine CARE, 928-401-0382

Taylor McKinnon, Center for Biological Diversity, 928-310-6713

###

Tribal Court Judgment upholds Northern Paiute Gathering Rights

Kuiu Kwaan Tribal Court issues declaratory judgment upholding gathering rights of Northern Paiute 'Kwassuh' Wesley Dick

Article copyright by Brenda Norrell
Censored News
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com
Update on charges in Nevada: Picking charge dropped, trespassing charge remains

TACOMA, Wash. -- The Kuiu Kwaan Tribal Court in Tacoma, Washington, issued a declaratory judgment in the case of Northern Paiute traditional gatherer Wesley Dick vs. the United States. The combined court of judges from across Indian country issued the judgment upholding the right of Wesley Dick, Kwassuh, to gather tules in the traditional way, after he was cited and fined $800 by US Fish and Wildlife in Nevada.

Kuiu Kwaan Tribal Court Lead Judge Rudy Al James and judges from across Indian country issued the declaratory judgment on July 20. The legal citations include laws that uphold the authority of tribal courts and protect human rights and fundamental freedoms. The US Code which prohibits genocide and discrimination of culture and religion is included in the legal citations.

"In the matter of Wesley Glen Dick, Jr., vs. The United States ... It is the judgment of the Court that the United States violated the First Amendment of the United States Constitution, which says, 'Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion.' The right to freedom of religion was denied to Mr. Dick by restricting his right to practice his religion, by preventing his harvest of plants necessary to carry out his religious practices. The Native American Free Exercise of Religious Act of 1993 protects the religious use of animal and plants necessary to carry out one's religious practices. Therefore it is the judgment of this Court that all charges and fines must be dismissed against Mr. Wesley Dick, Jr., on this 20th day of July, 2011."

Kwassuh told Censored News, "This is the reason why my family and I traveled 1,000 miles from home, to get fair justice served from a Tribal Court concerning Tribal matters. I appeared before the very knowledgeable Tribal representatives of the Kuiu Kwaan Tribal Court. Tribal Court Judge Rudy Al James did an outstanding job recognizing every detail of my case and more. There needs to be more Tribal Courts like this one that fully represents all of our Indigenous Nations of peoples."

After enduring the financial burden of the 1,000 mile trip, Kwassuh said Thursday, "My full faith will get us home safely. We are all thankful for the support of the people who made it possible for us to make this very important trip. I plan on sharing how we possess our sacred Indigenous right with others who want to listen and put an end to the overbearing domination by the U.S. Government that's been taking place too much, as well the encroachment of our lands."

Kwassuh said his people refer to themselves in terms of their traditional foods.

"My people in the area of Nevada are known as the Numa. In the Paiute language, that means 'the Native People.' In Nevada the identity of the Numa is what they are known for eating the source of food in a certain area.
"Pyramid Lake Numa, outside of Reno, is a Paiute. Numa are known for the fish in their area Cui-ui Ticutta (fish eaters). The fish is a rare species that only lives in Pyramid Lake. Fort Bidwell Paiutes, Numa, are known as Kida Ticutta (groundhog eaters).

"Fallon Stillwater Paiutes, Numa, are known as the Toi-Ticutta (cattail eaters). Because of the various uses the Toi-Ticutta makes use of the tule plant."

Kwassuh said he knows of at least 20 uses of this plant. "What people don't recognize is that before there were any non-Native people in the Toi-Ticutta area, the people lived very well"
Referring to a historical marker, Kwassuh said points out that the United States is well aware of the history of his people here. "The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Department of the Interior, and the Fallon Paiute-Shoshone Tribe are well aware of our existence from our people today, and the past, in order to produce this sign, that is located in the area where I was cited by the U.S. Game Warden."

"Ancient human remains were discovered in a cave in the local area and the Nevada State Museum in Carson City is knowledgeable. Also the Toi-Ticutta are aware that he is my ancestor and is claimed to be one of the oldest ancient Native Americans in the Western United States. He was dated as 10,650 years old, an estimate by the Nevada State Museum archaeologists," Kwassuh said.
"I am a member of a federally recognized tribe, the Fallon Paiute-Shoshone Tribe. I am a Toi-Ticutta."

In Tacoma, the Kuiu Kwaan Combined Traditional Tribal Court cited the Northwest Ordinance of 1787 and the Indian Tribal Justice Act, which uphold the authority of tribal courts. The tribal court also cited US Code, Chapter 50A, Section 1091 on Genocide which prohibits discrimination of culture and religion and prohibits genocide.

The judgment is signed by Kuiu Kwaan Lead Tribal Judge Rudy Al James; Jack McCloud of the Nisqually Nation; Dr. Betty Case, Tribal Judge of the Cherokee Nation; Walter Harding, Associate Judge of the Wampanoag Nation; Eric Brewer, Associate Judge of the Nisqually Nation; Steve Brown, Associate Tribal Judge of the Concow Nation; Hadassah Baht Yisrael of the Yisrael Nation and Leroy Rose of the Cherokee Nation.

UPDATE July 27, 2011:
"The charges of picking the plant were dropped but they are still holding on to me trespassing.  It's crazy because I'm due in Reno District Court on October 11, 2011.  I'm being charged with trespassing on my own aborigional territory; the court date is the day after Columbus Day." Wesley Dick

COMMENTS
Janice Gardipe, Paitue/Western Shoshone:
"Numu Grace Dick We need to support our young people when they have an old Indian spirit in them that wants to keep our Paiute Traditional Cultural Ways of Life of our ancestors. We also need to protect our native plants and use them for what they were used for in the old way, the ways that were given and taught to our people by the Creator, for our survival as a people. These Ways of Life are our inherent rights as Native people in our In digenous homeland territories of the Numu Teepa(our peoples earth). We need to gather our native plants for food, medicine, basket materials, tule duck decoys, etc., when the time is right. There are some of us that are still practicing this Way of Life of our Numu people. We go out every year to gather all types of native plants for food including our sacred pine nuts (Tuba'a) from our sacred tree, the Pine Nut Tree (Tubape). This is what we grew up doing and we continue to practice and live this way of life because it is who we are as Indian people. We are the stewards of the earth in this country and our ancestors have been the caretakers for thousands of years and they did not have permits, only offerings, prayers, and they gave thanks at large gatherings which included traditional food, round dancing and Paiute songs.(i.e.,Pine Nut Dance)."


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Copyright Censored News. This article may not be reprinted without permission: brendanorrell@gmail.com

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Wednesday, July 20, 2011

A Victory for Protection of Sogorea Te, Glen Cove

A Victory for Protection of Sogorea Te
After 98 days and nights of a continuous prayer vigil, the Committee to Protect Glen Cove is pleased to announce a victory in the struggle to protect the sacred grounds of Sogorea Te/Glen Cove.
Yesterday, the Yocha Dehe and Cortina tribes established a cultural easement and settlement agreement with the City of Vallejo and the Greater Vallejo Recreation District (GVRD). The agreement sets a legal precedent for granting Native peoples jurisdiction over their sacred sites and ancestral lands. The cultural easement forever guarantees that the Yocha Dehe and Cortina tribes will have legal oversight in all activities taking place on the sacred burial grounds of Sogorea Te/Glen Cove. It also represents a significant step forward in enacting tribal sovereignty, as the first such easement under CA Senate Bill 18 to be negotiated at the city and recreational district levels.
Read more ...
http://protectglencove.org

Peoples Movements Assembly Southwest Tour Conclusion

Living the Peoples Movements Assembly in the Southwest organizing tour The People’s Movement Assembly Southwest Organizing tour, the Conclusion
By Alba Mota
The People’s Movement Assembly Southwest Organizing tour from June 1st to July 6th, 2011 served as political and social catalyst for flow and exchange of information and network building related to the social and political struggles of the disenfranchised communities of the Southwest of the United States. On one hand, encouraging discussion, analysis and understanding of the issues of the Southwest indigenous community such as: land and water contamination, warfare production near civilian communities, lack to access to quality food for indigenous communities, right to food sovereignty, violations of sacred land and mountains, and other hand, taking a closer look to the Chicano movement history and the young people involvement in community organizing. How these young people are seeking to find through cultivation of the land a way to identify issues and seek a different approach for fighting back.
Nonetheless, these struggles are very much invisible to the rest of the country and disconnected to the realty that touches upon the reality of the rest of the United States and Latin America. Read more ...

Tuesday, July 19, 2011

Phoenix: Indigenous Weekly Runs/Hikes/Walks


Click image to enlarge.
The Council Advocating an Indigenous Manifesto invites you to join them in their weekly walk/hike/run in Phoenix, Wednesday July 20, 2011, from 6:30 to 8 pm. The purpose is to create healthy lifestyles and to network. Contact ehardy7th@gmail.com

Paiute traditional gatherer takes case to Kuiu Kwaan Court in Tacoma

Kuiu Kwaan Court in Tacoma, Wash., supports traditional Paiute craftsman gathering tules

By Brenda Norrell
Censored News
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com
Update July 19, 2011, 8 pm

TACOMA, Wash. -- Northern Paiute traditional gatherer Wesley Dick, "Kwassuh," and his family traveled more than 1,000 miles from northern Nevada and appeared before a tribal judge in Kuiu Kwaan Court in Tacoma, Washington on Tuesday.

Kwassuh, traditional craftsman, took his case of gathering tule to Kuiu Kwaan Tlingit Tribal Judge Rudy James in Tacoma, after Kwassuh was charged and fined $800 by a Nevada game warden while gathering tules in May.

Kwassuh said on Tuesday night that a declaration is being prepared to protect Indigenous gathering rights. "This is a new movement," Kwassuh said.

Kwassuh, one of the few remaining traditional gatherers and craftsmen of the Northern Paiute, said he is fighting for the rights of all Indigenous Peoples as traditional gatherers.

After appearing before the Kuiu Kwaan Tribal Court, on Tuesday, July 19, 2011, in Tacoma, he said, "They do respect Indigenous culture, traditional lifeways, and acknowledge our sacred religious freedom -- all that I am trying to keep alive."

At home in Stillwater, Nevada, Kwassuh is a member of the Fallon Paiute Shoshone Indian Nation. However, he said two tribal council members want him to give into policies, limitations and regulations. In the struggle to retain Indigenous culture and lifeways, Kwassuh said he and other traditional people refuse to give into the council's restrictions and authority. 

Kwassuh was gathering tule in the ceremonial way when he was cited by a Nevada game warden and given fines of $800 in May. For the past 18 years Kwassuh, 45, has worked an average of 170 hides a year of deer, moose, elk, buffalo and antelope in the traditional style of brain-tanning. Many items are made for powwow dancers, including moccasins, fan handles and hair wraps. He also makes items for ceremonies such as various sized hand drums. No chemicals are used, only natural elements such as the sun, water, brains, fire and stretching the hide by hand. This direct hands-on experience keeps him in touch with the spirituality of the animal hide that he works with.

Hide work is not a hobby, it is a way of life, he said.

Hunting and plant gathering are very sacred to Kwassuh and the tanning of the hide is the end result in giving an animal honor by using it for nutrition, clothing, tools and ceremonies. These traditional ways were taught to him by elders, friends and relatives who shared stories with him when he was a child, as well as many experiences from his youth into adulthood. Living on the Fallon Paiute Shoshone Indian Nation, Kwassuh has seen and experienced the loss of Native culture among his people and other tribal people at a drastically growing rate.

Demonstrations and workshops are the best way that he can reach many people at one time. He is always willing to teach whoever is willing to listen and learn. All ages have been successful and all the hard work and experience make it all worthwhile.

From start to finish, each hide is different and has its own individuality. Kwassuh has learned the dangers and extreme physical work that is needed in all seasonal conditions throughout the year. Full faith in the Creator has kept him safe and much thanks is given to the traditional people in his life that he has learned from.

Kwassuh shares his story:

On May 14, 2011, my son and I went to gather the tule plant in order to make some tule duck decoys for my youngest son’s elementary class demonstration. I was going to share the importance and use of what the Northern Paiute people did in the past and allow the class to realize and experience the importance of today’s usefulness of the tule plant. Also, to see and hear from a real “Toi-Ticutta” descendant (this means cattail eaters in the Northern Paiute language.)

At the end of gathering the tules on Saturday afternoon, we were confronted by a U.S. Fish and Game warden. When he asked, I let him know why I was out there. The officer ignored everything I said and proceeded to write his citations. I stated to the officer that there were no signs in sight indicating NO PLANT PICKING or DESIGNATED ROUTES ONLY. The officer still ignored what I said and proceeded with his citation writing.

I asked the officer if he acknowledged the American Indian Religious Freedom Act. The officer said "NO." I also asked the officer if he understood the Native culture, the officer said, "NO." I then let the officer know several times that a majority of the tules that I gathered were picked on the Stillwater Indian Nation and was still ignored.

I then advised the officer that he was interrupting the ceremonial tule plant gathering methods that were taught to me by my people. The end result was that the officer confiscated my bundle of tules -- which also included the bundles that was picked on Indian land. He then gave me two citations: “Take any animal or plant without authorization,” with a fine of $625.00 and “travel off a designated route,” with a fine of $175.00.

I have always known of this traditional area, by my grandmother and other elders, of a place where we can come and get what we need. Now I find that my aboriginal rights are being disregarded and this area has been taken over by non-Native people. Now, the tourists are more welcome. The non-Natives recognize my ancestors of the past. But now I face a punishment for doing as I was taught and am also being punished for traveling on my own aboriginal home territory.

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For reprint permission, please contact brendanorrell@gmail.com
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Sunday, July 17, 2011

Oil Spill into Cutbank River, Blackfeet Nation Montana

Photo copyright Destini Vaile
Congratulations to Destini Vaile, Blackfeet, who investigated and shared this with Censored News on Sunday. Now, the mainstream media is trying to play down the oil spill.

OIL PIPELINE BREAKS, SIGNIFICANT VOLUME OF OIL FLOODED INTO CUTBANK RIVER

Article and photo copyright Destini Vaile, Blackfeet, and Reed Perry
Censored News
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com
July 16, 2011

BLACKFEET INDIAN NATION-- A break in an oil collection pipeline on the eastern prairie of the Blackfeet Indian Nation, approximately 5 miles from the town of Cutbank, has led to a flood of crude that has been flowing approximately one mile over land and into the Cutbank River. Blackfeet Nation officials received word of the spill on Tuesday, but it remains unclear when, or why the pipeline, which is managed by FX Drilling, actually began leaking oil.

Photo copyright Destini Vaile
Blackfeet officials confirmed that oil was spotted in the river at least two weeks ago by a kayaker who reported the incident to 911. According to a preliminary investigation by the Blackfoot Environmental Department, FX Drilling attempted to fix the pipeline after the 911 call, but left the break unmended for over a week, claiming they were unable to access the site. Also according to the investigation, FX failed to initiate cleanup on the site after fixing the pipeline. On Wednesday, nearly three weeks after the initial discovery of the spill, absorbent booms were finally placed by Indian Country Environmental Associates (ICEA) on the shore of the Cutbank where the oil merges with the river. ICEA is a company contracted by the tribe to handle cleanup of oil spills on the Blackfeet Nation.

FX Drilling Corporation has claimed that the leak released "two barrels" of oil, or 84 gallons. However, officials with the Blackfeet Environmental Department have estimated the spill to be "several thousand gallons." The volume of oil observed at the site was large enough to seep through a wheat field and down a coulee for approximately one mile where it entered the Cutbank River. It is the second significant release of oil into Montana rivers during the last month.
Photo copyright Destini Vaile
Several questions plague the incident, not the least is FX Drilling's handling of the spillage. Their failure to disclose the event to the press, community, or Tribal authorities has caused suspicion that their conduct was not merely negligent, but indicative of a coverup. According to Mary Clare Weatherwax, an official at the Blackfeet Environmental Department, "There was definitely a lack of communication that would have allowed a proper response." Weatherwax was also concerned that a wetland in the path of the spill had absorbed much of the oil as it traveled downhill.

The authors of this article are Destini Vaile, a writer and member of the Blackfeet Tribe, and Reed Perry, a Montana Ecologist. They became aware of the spill via rumor of a serious accident on the Blackfeet Nation. On Friday, the two traveled to the source of the leak on the edge of a wheat field and began measuring the dimensions of the contamination. They obtained soil and water samples from the shore of the river that are now awaiting analysis at the Blackfeet Community Water Lab.)

Comments
Dr. Robert Lame Bull McDonald, M.D., Blackfeet Warbonnet Society, said, "It is a good time to ask ourselves if extracting oil from the heart of our mother earth is in the best interest of the Pikuni Peigan Bloods and the Siksika and all of our relatives both two legged and four as well as the soyatopi underwater spirits.
"Its a good time to ask the tribal council to address the issue of the Blackfeet Nation getting taken advantage of by the oil companies. If we sell any oil at all, We should be getting way more than $2/barrel when today's crude oil price is listed at over $94/barrel.
"If they upset the underwater spirits and threaten the balance of our nations ecosystem, there is no price that we should accept from the oil barons. There is no price that can be paid that would allow me to accept the destruction of our sacred circle of life. The Medicine Wheel can not be destroyed on our sacred land by oil barons. We should escort them and all their workers off the rez immediately and bring in the Crazy Dogs to keep them away from our homelands."

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Copyright Censored News: This article may not be reposted or published without permission of the author and photographer. Please share the link.
http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2011/07/oil-spill-into-cutback-river-blackfeet.html
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In the news:
Spill went unreported for a month: http://fuelfix.com/blog/20​11/07/19/new-mont-spill-we​nt-unreported-for-a-month

Great Falls Tribune story, with Destini's photos: http://www.greatfallstribu​ne.com/article/20110719/NE​WS01/107190301/Oil-pipelin​e-leaks-15-20-barrels-near​-Cut-Bank-Creek

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