Saturday, October 10, 2015

Opening of Cochabamba Climate Conference 2015

.
Photo shared by Bogota Mayor Gustavo Petro
World Peoples Conference on Climate Change and the Defense of Life, Cochabamba, Bolivia, 
Oct. 10, 2015
Bolivia President Evo Morales: 'Capitalism is the Cancer of Mother Earth'

Welcoming those arriving from five continents, Bolivia President Evo Morales said climate change did not come from the south, and capitalism is like a cancer to Mother Earth. President Morales said the declaration from this conference with be presented to Paris COP 21.
Watch opening statement today (Espanol)

Activists and indigenous peoples call on the developed world to fullfil its responsibility to act on climate change.
To cheers of “Ole! Ole! Ole!” Bolivia’s President Evo Morales walked on stage to officially open the People’s Climate Change Conference in the city of Cochabamba on Saturday.

Five thousand people from more than 40 countries applauded Morales for hosting the summit, which is focused on how climate change is impacting the developing world.

This content was originally published by teleSUR at the following address: 
 "http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Bolivias-Climate-Summit-Opens-with-Cheers-and-Calls-for-Action-20151010-0014.html". If you intend to use it, please cite the source and provide a link to the original article. www.teleSURtv.net/english
News > Latin America
Bolivia's Climate Summit Opens with Cheers and Calls for Action
IMAGES
 
Indigenous people will have a say on future climate policy | Photo: Ministerio de Comunicación de Bolivia
 
Delegates demand real Climate Change reform
 
Delegates from Chile, Canada, Argentina and Venezuela are at summit | Photo: telesur
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Published 10 October 2015 (14 hours 32 minutes ago)
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We Recommend

Activists and indigenous peoples call on the developed world to fullfil its responsibility to act on climate change.
To cheers of “Ole! Ole! Ole!” Bolivia’s President Evo Morales walked on stage to officially open the People’s Climate Change Conference in the city of Cochabamba on Saturday.

Five thousand people from more than 40 countries applauded Morales for hosting the summit, which is focused on how climate change is impacting the developing world.

Morales wasted no time in blaming capitalism for the environmental crisis, saying it has ‘’achieved nothing in the world.’’ He called for a halt to deforestation, telling his critics — who note that around two-thirds of Bolivia’s greenhouse gases come from deforestation — that for every person in Bolivia there are ‘’more than 5,000 trees.’’

RELATED: Nature First: A Look Back at Bolivia's 2010 Climate Conference

While some environmental groups are disappointed that the Bolivian government has allowed oil and gas exploration in areas they would like to see preserved, Morales often points out that it is industrialized nations that release the vast majority of greenhouse gases.

That point was stressed at the conference, with leaders from the developing world calling on Western nations to take responsibility for the effects climate change is already having on the Global South.

France’s Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius was one of the few representatives from a Western government at the summit. He conceded that ‘’industrialized countries have a particular responsibility’’ when it comes to climate change and urged those in attendance to ‘’engage and show what direction the governments should follow’’ in their efforts to tackle the problem.

Bolivia’s ambassador to the UN, Diego Parry, told teleSUR English he plans on presenting those views at the next major gathering of the global community. ‘’We want to hear the voice and the words of the people on climate change,” he said, “and to hear their proposals for discussion at the Paris summit in December.”

Any proposals discussed at the Bolivia summit will be formally submitted for consideration at the Paris talks.


The main focus of the summit is to give grassroots activists and other ordinary people in the developing world a say on how future policy should be shaped. According to the Global Climate Risk Index, in the past 25 years an estimated 95 percent of fatalities from natural disasters have occurred in developing countries, with the rate of such disasters expected to increase as the effects of climate change worsen.

At the conference, attendees heard that if the temperature of the planet increases by another 2 degrees celsius than an environmental catastrophe will be unavoidable. In addition to natural disasters, people could go also go hungry:  For every 1 degree rise in the global temperature, grain yields are expected to fall by 5 percent.

Those who will be most affected by changes in the climate want to be heard. Indigenous people from all across Bolivia arrived in Cochabamba with one simple message. ‘’We just want to protect our beloved mother earth,’’ one delegate told teleSUR english. They hope to confront the UN’s Ban Ki-moon and Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro with that message, both of whom are attending the conference.

RELATED: Bolivia Gives the Poor a Platform to Demand Climate Action

So far no concrete proposals have been discussed. Delegates hope that behind all the pomp and ceremony, however, real solutions to help combat change will be found.

In the words of President Morales, ‘’the planet has a limit and we have almost reached that limit.’’ And whatever the shortcomings of Bolivia when it comes to its environmental record, few here would disagree with that — and with the reality that those most responsible for pushing the planet to its limit have yet to fulfill their responsibilities to the world’s poor.

This content was originally published by teleSUR at the following address: 
 "http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Bolivias-Climate-Summit-Opens-with-Cheers-and-Calls-for-Action-20151010-0014.html". If you intend to use it, please cite the source and provide a link to the original article. www.teleSURtv.net/english
Bolivia's Climate Summit Opens with Cheers and Calls for Action
IMAGES
 
Indigenous people will have a say on future climate policy | Photo: Ministerio de Comunicación de Bolivia
 
Delegates demand real Climate Change reform
 
Delegates from Chile, Canada, Argentina and Venezuela are at summit | Photo: telesur
Previous
Next
Published 10 October 2015 (14 hours 32 minutes ago)
0
Comments
43224
We Recommend

Activists and indigenous peoples call on the developed world to fullfil its responsibility to act on climate change.
To cheers of “Ole! Ole! Ole!” Bolivia’s President Evo Morales walked on stage to officially open the People’s Climate Change Conference in the city of Cochabamba on Saturday.

Five thousand people from more than 40 countries applauded Morales for hosting the summit, which is focused on how climate change is impacting the developing world.

Morales wasted no time in blaming capitalism for the environmental crisis, saying it has ‘’achieved nothing in the world.’’ He called for a halt to deforestation, telling his critics — who note that around two-thirds of Bolivia’s greenhouse gases come from deforestation — that for every person in Bolivia there are ‘’more than 5,000 trees.’’

RELATED: Nature First: A Look Back at Bolivia's 2010 Climate Conference

While some environmental groups are disappointed that the Bolivian government has allowed oil and gas exploration in areas they would like to see preserved, Morales often points out that it is industrialized nations that release the vast majority of greenhouse gases.

That point was stressed at the conference, with leaders from the developing world calling on Western nations to take responsibility for the effects climate change is already having on the Global South.

France’s Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius was one of the few representatives from a Western government at the summit. He conceded that ‘’industrialized countries have a particular responsibility’’ when it comes to climate change and urged those in attendance to ‘’engage and show what direction the governments should follow’’ in their efforts to tackle the problem.

Bolivia’s ambassador to the UN, Diego Parry, told teleSUR English he plans on presenting those views at the next major gathering of the global community. ‘’We want to hear the voice and the words of the people on climate change,” he said, “and to hear their proposals for discussion at the Paris summit in December.”

Any proposals discussed at the Bolivia summit will be formally submitted for consideration at the Paris talks.


The main focus of the summit is to give grassroots activists and other ordinary people in the developing world a say on how future policy should be shaped. According to the Global Climate Risk Index, in the past 25 years an estimated 95 percent of fatalities from natural disasters have occurred in developing countries, with the rate of such disasters expected to increase as the effects of climate change worsen.

At the conference, attendees heard that if the temperature of the planet increases by another 2 degrees celsius than an environmental catastrophe will be unavoidable. In addition to natural disasters, people could go also go hungry:  For every 1 degree rise in the global temperature, grain yields are expected to fall by 5 percent.

Those who will be most affected by changes in the climate want to be heard. Indigenous people from all across Bolivia arrived in Cochabamba with one simple message. ‘’We just want to protect our beloved mother earth,’’ one delegate told teleSUR english. They hope to confront the UN’s Ban Ki-moon and Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro with that message, both of whom are attending the conference.

RELATED: Bolivia Gives the Poor a Platform to Demand Climate Action

So far no concrete proposals have been discussed. Delegates hope that behind all the pomp and ceremony, however, real solutions to help combat change will be found.

In the words of President Morales, ‘’the planet has a limit and we have almost reached that limit.’’ And whatever the shortcomings of Bolivia when it comes to its environmental record, few here would disagree with that — and with the reality that those most responsible for pushing the planet to its limit have yet to fulfill their responsibilities to the world’s poor.



This content was originally published by teleSUR at the following address: 
 "http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Bolivias-Climate-Summit-Opens-with-Cheers-and-Calls-for-Action-20151010-0014.html". If you intend to use it, please cite the source and provide a link to the original article. www.teleSURtv.net/english
Bolivia's Climate Summit Opens with Cheers and Calls for Action
IMAGES
 
Indigenous people will have a say on future climate policy | Photo: Ministerio de Comunicación de Bolivia
 
Delegates demand real Climate Change reform
 
Delegates from Chile, Canada, Argentina and Venezuela are at summit | Photo: telesur
Previous
Next
Published 10 October 2015 (14 hours 32 minutes ago)
0
Comments
43224
We Recommend

Activists and indigenous peoples call on the developed world to fullfil its responsibility to act on climate change.
To cheers of “Ole! Ole! Ole!” Bolivia’s President Evo Morales walked on stage to officially open the People’s Climate Change Conference in the city of Cochabamba on Saturday.

Five thousand people from more than 40 countries applauded Morales for hosting the summit, which is focused on how climate change is impacting the developing world.

Morales wasted no time in blaming capitalism for the environmental crisis, saying it has ‘’achieved nothing in the world.’’ He called for a halt to deforestation, telling his critics — who note that around two-thirds of Bolivia’s greenhouse gases come from deforestation — that for every person in Bolivia there are ‘’more than 5,000 trees.’’

RELATED: Nature First: A Look Back at Bolivia's 2010 Climate Conference

While some environmental groups are disappointed that the Bolivian government has allowed oil and gas exploration in areas they would like to see preserved, Morales often points out that it is industrialized nations that release the vast majority of greenhouse gases.

That point was stressed at the conference, with leaders from the developing world calling on Western nations to take responsibility for the effects climate change is already having on the Global South.

France’s Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius was one of the few representatives from a Western government at the summit. He conceded that ‘’industrialized countries have a particular responsibility’’ when it comes to climate change and urged those in attendance to ‘’engage and show what direction the governments should follow’’ in their efforts to tackle the problem.

Bolivia’s ambassador to the UN, Diego Parry, told teleSUR English he plans on presenting those views at the next major gathering of the global community. ‘’We want to hear the voice and the words of the people on climate change,” he said, “and to hear their proposals for discussion at the Paris summit in December.”

Any proposals discussed at the Bolivia summit will be formally submitted for consideration at the Paris talks.


The main focus of the summit is to give grassroots activists and other ordinary people in the developing world a say on how future policy should be shaped. According to the Global Climate Risk Index, in the past 25 years an estimated 95 percent of fatalities from natural disasters have occurred in developing countries, with the rate of such disasters expected to increase as the effects of climate change worsen.

At the conference, attendees heard that if the temperature of the planet increases by another 2 degrees celsius than an environmental catastrophe will be unavoidable. In addition to natural disasters, people could go also go hungry:  For every 1 degree rise in the global temperature, grain yields are expected to fall by 5 percent.

Those who will be most affected by changes in the climate want to be heard. Indigenous people from all across Bolivia arrived in Cochabamba with one simple message. ‘’We just want to protect our beloved mother earth,’’ one delegate told teleSUR english. They hope to confront the UN’s Ban Ki-moon and Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro with that message, both of whom are attending the conference.

RELATED: Bolivia Gives the Poor a Platform to Demand Climate Action

So far no concrete proposals have been discussed. Delegates hope that behind all the pomp and ceremony, however, real solutions to help combat change will be found.

In the words of President Morales, ‘’the planet has a limit and we have almost reached that limit.’’ And whatever the shortcomings of Bolivia when it comes to its environmental record, few here would disagree with that — and with the reality that those most responsible for pushing the planet to its limit have yet to fulfill their responsibilities to the world’s poor.

This content was originally published by teleSUR at the following address: 
 "http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Bolivias-Climate-Summit-Opens-with-Cheers-and-Calls-for-Action-20151010-0014.html". If you intend to use it, please cite the source and provide a link to the original article. www.teleSURtv.net/english
Bolivia's Climate Summit Opens with Cheers and Calls for Action
IMAGES
 
Indigenous people will have a say on future climate policy | Photo: Ministerio de Comunicación de Bolivia
 
Delegates demand real Climate Change reform
 
Delegates from Chile, Canada, Argentina and Venezuela are at summit | Photo: telesur
Previous
Next
Published 10 October 2015 (14 hours 32 minutes ago)
0
Comments
43224
We Recommend

Activists and indigenous peoples call on the developed world to fullfil its responsibility to act on climate change.
To cheers of “Ole! Ole! Ole!” Bolivia’s President Evo Morales walked on stage to officially open the People’s Climate Change Conference in the city of Cochabamba on Saturday.

Five thousand people from more than 40 countries applauded Morales for hosting the summit, which is focused on how climate change is impacting the developing world.

Morales wasted no time in blaming capitalism for the environmental crisis, saying it has ‘’achieved nothing in the world.’’ He called for a halt to deforestation, telling his critics — who note that around two-thirds of Bolivia’s greenhouse gases come from deforestation — that for every person in Bolivia there are ‘’more than 5,000 trees.’’

RELATED: Nature First: A Look Back at Bolivia's 2010 Climate Conference

While some environmental groups are disappointed that the Bolivian government has allowed oil and gas exploration in areas they would like to see preserved, Morales often points out that it is industrialized nations that release the vast majority of greenhouse gases.

That point was stressed at the conference, with leaders from the developing world calling on Western nations to take responsibility for the effects climate change is already having on the Global South.

France’s Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius was one of the few representatives from a Western government at the summit. He conceded that ‘’industrialized countries have a particular responsibility’’ when it comes to climate change and urged those in attendance to ‘’engage and show what direction the governments should follow’’ in their efforts to tackle the problem.

Bolivia’s ambassador to the UN, Diego Parry, told teleSUR English he plans on presenting those views at the next major gathering of the global community. ‘’We want to hear the voice and the words of the people on climate change,” he said, “and to hear their proposals for discussion at the Paris summit in December.”

Any proposals discussed at the Bolivia summit will be formally submitted for consideration at the Paris talks.


The main focus of the summit is to give grassroots activists and other ordinary people in the developing world a say on how future policy should be shaped. According to the Global Climate Risk Index, in the past 25 years an estimated 95 percent of fatalities from natural disasters have occurred in developing countries, with the rate of such disasters expected to increase as the effects of climate change worsen.

At the conference, attendees heard that if the temperature of the planet increases by another 2 degrees celsius than an environmental catastrophe will be unavoidable. In addition to natural disasters, people could go also go hungry:  For every 1 degree rise in the global temperature, grain yields are expected to fall by 5 percent.

Those who will be most affected by changes in the climate want to be heard. Indigenous people from all across Bolivia arrived in Cochabamba with one simple message. ‘’We just want to protect our beloved mother earth,’’ one delegate told teleSUR english. They hope to confront the UN’s Ban Ki-moon and Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro with that message, both of whom are attending the conference.

RELATED: Bolivia Gives the Poor a Platform to Demand Climate Action

So far no concrete proposals have been discussed. Delegates hope that behind all the pomp and ceremony, however, real solutions to help combat change will be found.

In the words of President Morales, ‘’the planet has a limit and we have almost reached that limit.’’ And whatever the shortcomings of Bolivia when it comes to its environmental record, few here would disagree with that — and with the reality that those most responsible for pushing the planet to its limit have yet to fulfill their responsibilities to the world’s poor.

This content was originally published by teleSUR at the following address: 
 "http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Bolivias-Climate-Summit-Opens-with-Cheers-and-Calls-for-Action-20151010-0014.html". If you intend to use it, please cite the source and provide a link to the original article. www.teleSURtv.net/english
Bolivia's Climate Summit Opens with Cheers and Calls for Action
IMAGES
 
Indigenous people will have a say on future climate policy | Photo: Ministerio de Comunicación de Bolivia
 
Delegates demand real Climate Change reform
 
Delegates from Chile, Canada, Argentina and Venezuela are at summit | Photo: telesur
Previous
Next
Published 10 October 2015 (14 hours 32 minutes ago)
0
Comments
43224
We Recommend

Activists and indigenous peoples call on the developed world to fullfil its responsibility to act on climate change.
To cheers of “Ole! Ole! Ole!” Bolivia’s President Evo Morales walked on stage to officially open the People’s Climate Change Conference in the city of Cochabamba on Saturday.

Five thousand people from more than 40 countries applauded Morales for hosting the summit, which is focused on how climate change is impacting the developing world.

Morales wasted no time in blaming capitalism for the environmental crisis, saying it has ‘’achieved nothing in the world.’’ He called for a halt to deforestation, telling his critics — who note that around two-thirds of Bolivia’s greenhouse gases come from deforestation — that for every person in Bolivia there are ‘’more than 5,000 trees.’’

RELATED: Nature First: A Look Back at Bolivia's 2010 Climate Conference

While some environmental groups are disappointed that the Bolivian government has allowed oil and gas exploration in areas they would like to see preserved, Morales often points out that it is industrialized nations that release the vast majority of greenhouse gases.

That point was stressed at the conference, with leaders from the developing world calling on Western nations to take responsibility for the effects climate change is already having on the Global South.

France’s Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius was one of the few representatives from a Western government at the summit. He conceded that ‘’industrialized countries have a particular responsibility’’ when it comes to climate change and urged those in attendance to ‘’engage and show what direction the governments should follow’’ in their efforts to tackle the problem.

Bolivia’s ambassador to the UN, Diego Parry, told teleSUR English he plans on presenting those views at the next major gathering of the global community. ‘’We want to hear the voice and the words of the people on climate change,” he said, “and to hear their proposals for discussion at the Paris summit in December.”

Any proposals discussed at the Bolivia summit will be formally submitted for consideration at the Paris talks.


The main focus of the summit is to give grassroots activists and other ordinary people in the developing world a say on how future policy should be shaped. According to the Global Climate Risk Index, in the past 25 years an estimated 95 percent of fatalities from natural disasters have occurred in developing countries, with the rate of such disasters expected to increase as the effects of climate change worsen.

At the conference, attendees heard that if the temperature of the planet increases by another 2 degrees celsius than an environmental catastrophe will be unavoidable. In addition to natural disasters, people could go also go hungry:  For every 1 degree rise in the global temperature, grain yields are expected to fall by 5 percent.

Those who will be most affected by changes in the climate want to be heard. Indigenous people from all across Bolivia arrived in Cochabamba with one simple message. ‘’We just want to protect our beloved mother earth,’’ one delegate told teleSUR english. They hope to confront the UN’s Ban Ki-moon and Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro with that message, both of whom are attending the conference.

RELATED: Bolivia Gives the Poor a Platform to Demand Climate Action

So far no concrete proposals have been discussed. Delegates hope that behind all the pomp and ceremony, however, real solutions to help combat change will be found.

In the words of President Morales, ‘’the planet has a limit and we have almost reached that limit.’’ And whatever the shortcomings of Bolivia when it comes to its environmental record, few here would disagree with that — and with the reality that those most responsible for pushing the planet to its limit have yet to fulfill their responsibilities to the world’s poor.



This content was originally published by teleSUR at the following address: 
 "http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Bolivias-Climate-Summit-Opens-with-Cheers-and-Calls-for-Action-20151010-0014.html". If you intend to use it, please cite the source and provide a link to the original article. www.teleSURtv.net/english

TeleSur reports: Bolivia is hosting the second People’s Climate Change Conference Tiquipaya II this weekend, and President Evo Morales says the country will push for far-reaching measures to tackle the problem. Representatives of more than 40 countries will discuss the greenhouse gas effect, the hot topic of the conference. Environmental activists are calling on developed countries to pay their climate debt and realize that developing nations must also take steps to defend Mother Earth. Bolivia, for example, wants to stop deforestation, but recognizes that it must also improve its own record. 




Video by TeleSur
Published on Oct 10, 2015

 In the opening ceremony of the World Summit on Climate Change and the Defense of Life 2015, the Foreign Minister said that the people of Bolivia receives participants of the meeting hoping to build together a proposal to save the planet. Also, the chancellor urged the world population "not to remain with arms crossed "to the effects of climate change, because " our Earth is mortally wounded"
En el acto inaugural de la Cumbre Mundial por el Cambio Climático y la Defensa de la Vida 2015, el ministro de Relaciones Exteriores manifestó que el pueblo de Bolivia recibe a los participantes del encuentro con la esperanza de construir juntos una propuesta para salvar al planeta. Asimismo, el canciller exhortó a la población mundial a “no quedarse de los brazos cruzados” ante los efectos del cambio climático, pues “nuestra Tierra está herida de muerte."

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon’s remarks at Peoples World Conference on Climate Change and the Defence of Life

Cochabamba, Bolivia, 10 October 2015

T
hank you for your warm welcome.
Es un gran placer estar de vuelta en Bolivia, en el corazón de Sudamérica.
[It is a great pleasure to be back in Bolivia, in the heart of South America].
Anchatapuni Kusikuni kay jatun llajtaman chayayta. [I am very happy to be in this great land.]
I am pleased to be here to participate in the Peoples’ World Conference on Climate Change and the Defence of Life.
I thank President Evo Morales Ayma, the people of Bolivia and the representatives from different social movements and indigenous peoples gathered here for inviting me.
Muchas gracias.
Solpayki (Quechua)
Yuspagara. (Aymara)
The subject of your conference is important and timely.
Climate change and the defence of life on Earth are at the top of the international agenda this year.
Last month, world leaders adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.
President Morales was there for this historic moment.
In December, world leaders will gather in Paris hoping to finalize a meaningful, universal climate change agreement.
The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development is a concrete plan of action for ending poverty in all its dimensions, irreversibly, everywhere. 
It is a people’s agenda, agreed after many months of consultation between governments and peoples everywhere.
It is designed to advance inclusion and shared prosperity and to preserve our Mother Earth.
Our goal is transformation.  No-one must be left behind.
No man.  No child.  And, especially, no woman.
Tomorrow is Women’s Day here in Bolivia, the birthday of Adela Zamudio.
Bolivia’s best-known poet did not allow discrimination and lack of education to hold her back.
She rose above society’s constraints to become a leader for women’s emancipation.
I urge all women -- and men – to be inspired by her example.
We cannot achieve equitable sustainable development if we do not involve and respect half the world’s population.
We need a 50:50 Planet by 2030.
Here in Bolivia, you are setting a good example.
Bolivia is one of the few countries in the world with as many women as men in its Parliament. 
When women and men lead together, decisions better reflect the diverse needs of society.
Guaranteeing women’s participation in all levels of decision-making is crucial not just for gender equality, but for inclusive democracy and sustainable development.
Ladies and gentlemen,
Bolivia is notable, too, for its advocacy for the rights of indigenous peoples.
Indigenous peoples are among the world’s most vulnerable and marginalized people.
Yet their history, traditions, languages and knowledge are part of the very bedrock of human heritage.
There is much to be learnt from indigenous peoples as we seek to find solutions to the challenges of combatting climate change and managing Mother Earth’s resources in a sustainable way.
The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development must realize the rights of indigenous peoples across all the Goals.
Indigenous peoples face a wide range of challenges to their well-being.
These challenges include inadequate access to education, sanitation and housing, lack of prenatal care and widespread violence against women.
Too often, indigenous peoples are not adequately consulted in projects carried out in their territories that affect the environment and their livelihoods.
Indigenous peoples are often among the poorest peoples in their countries.
In many nations, the poverty gap between indigenous and non-indigenous groups is increasing.
This is unacceptable.
As we implement the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, we must do so in culturally appropriate ways that meet the needs of indigenous peoples and their conceptions of well-being.
Indigenous peoples must not be left behind.
Ladies and gentlemen,
I have talked about how Bolivia speaks up for women and for indigenous peoples.
There is a third constituency for whom Bolivia provides a powerful voice.
Mother Earth.
I commend the Government of Bolivia and President Morales for introducing International Mother Earth Day to the United Nations General Assembly in 2009.
Bolivia has also inspired the discussions on the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development with the principle of “vivir bien”.
In his recent speech to the UN General Assembly, President Morales explained “vivir bien”.
“Vivir bien” is living in solidarity with people and in harmony with Mother Earth.
“Vivir bien” reminds us that well-being is not only about material advantages, but social and spiritual well-being.
“Vivir bien” reminds us that well-being cannot be achieved without respecting and protecting our planet.
“Vivir bien” means that to achieve sustainable development we will have to adjust our own lifestyle.
These very sentiments were also recently and powerfully echoed by His Holiness Pope Francis.
The Pope came to speak to world leaders on the day they adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.
His recent Encyclical highlights the direct link between caring for the environment and caring for the world’s poor and vulnerable.
Caring for Mother Earth is a moral issue.
We must change how we use Mother Earth’s resources, and live in a manner that is sustainable.
This is especially true for the challenge of climate change.
We can no longer afford to burn our way to prosperity.
We have to transform our economies and seize the opportunities of a low-carbon future.
There is no Plan B because there is no Planet B.
In December, governments will meet in Paris to finalize an agreement on climate change.
It must be ambitious.
And it must involve all nations.
There is no longer any time for delay.
Climate change is upon us.
Here in Cochabamba you know this well.
Your mountain Tunari used to be capped with snow all year round.
Nowadays, it has snow only a few weeks a year.
All around the world, the effects of climate change are apparent.  And they are growing.
Droughts.  Fires.  Floods.  Landslides. 
Glaciers melting.  Oceans turning to acid.
Mother Earth is giving us a warning.
We must listen.
And we must act.
Ladies and gentlemen,
We know what we have to do to address climate change. 
We need a robust global agreement in Paris that commits all countries to curbing greenhouse gas emissions and strengthening resilience.
And we need action by all people everywhere – governments, civil society groups, local authorities and businesses.
Everyone has a role to play.
Paris must be a turning point in our collective effort to protect Mother Earth. 
We need an agreement that is durable and flexible so countries can increase their ambition at regular intervals. 
It must be credible, transparent and accountable.
It must send a clear signal that the transformation of the global economy in a low-carbon direction is inevitable, beneficial, and already under way.
Developed countries must provide a politically credible pathway for meeting their pledge of $100 billion dollars a year by 2020.
This is critical for trust, solidarity and equity.
And before Paris, the Green Climate Fund must be up and running and approving projects in developing countries, in particular, in Small Island Developing States and the Least Developed Countries.
These countries are among the most affected by climate change, but they have contributed least to the problem.
They are on the frontlines of climate change, and will suffer first, and worst.
This is why climate change is a moral issue, for this generation, now, and generations to come.
Ladies and gentlemen,
Climate change has been my priority and my passion since I took office.
I have attended all the climate conferences and engaged all world leaders relentlessly to make them aware of the urgency of action.
I believe we are making progress, and a transformative deal in Paris is in sight.
But we must not let up our pressure.
I count on your leadership.
You can count on mine.
Let me close by echoing a pledge you make here in the Andes.
It is a pledge I will ask world leaders to make with us.
Ama suwa (do not be a thief.
Ama llulla (do not be a liar).
Ama qhilla (do not be lazy).
Let us not steal from our planet.
We should manage its resources wisely.
Let us not lie.
We must honour our commitments to reduce emissions, strengthen resilience and reach a fair and ambitious global climate change agreement.
Finally, ama qhilla.
Let us spare no effort when working for a sustainable future for people and planet.
Let us work together for a better tomorrow and a life of dignity for all people, everywhere.
Muchas gracias.
Solpayki (Quechua)
Yuspagara. (Aymara)

IN SPANISH
Gracias por la cálida bienvenida que me han brindado.
Es un gran placer estar de vuelta en Bolivia, en el corazón de Sudamérica.
Me complace estar aquí para participar en la Conferencia Mundial de los Pueblos sobre Cambio Climático y Defensa de la Vida.
Doy las gracias al Presidente Morales, al pueblo de Bolivia y a los representantes de diferentes movimientos sociales y pueblos indígenas reunidos aquí por haberme invitado.
Muchas gracias.
Solpayki (quechua),
Yuspagara (aimara).
El tema de la conferencia que han organizado es importante y oportuno.
El cambio climático y la defensa de la vida en la Tierra ocupan un lugar prioritario en la agenda internacional de este año.
El mes pasado, los dirigentes del mundo aprobaron la Agenda 2030 para el Desarrollo Sostenible.
El Presidente Morales estaba allí para ese momento histórico.
En diciembre, los dirigentes del mundo se reunirán en París con la esperanza de concluir un acuerdo significativo y universal sobre el cambio climático.
La Agenda 2030 para el Desarrollo Sostenible es un plan concreto de acción para poner fin a la pobreza en todas sus dimensiones, de manera irreversible, en todo el mundo.
Es una agenda popular, acordada tras muchos meses de consultas entre los gobiernos y los pueblos de todo el mundo.
Está pensada para promover la inclusión y la prosperidad común y para preservar nuestra Madre Tierra.
Nuestro objetivo es la transformación. No se debe excluir a nadie.
Ningún hombre. Ningún niño. Y, sobre todo, ninguna mujer.
Mañana se celebra aquí, en Bolivia, el Día de la Mujer, en conmemoración del nacimiento de Adela Zamudio.
La poetisa más conocida de Bolivia no se dejó amedrentar por la discriminación ni la falta de educación.
Superó las restricciones de la sociedad y se convirtió en lideresa de la emancipación de la mujer.
Insto a todas las mujeres —y también a todos los hombres— a que se inspiren en su ejemplo.
No podemos lograr el desarrollo sostenible equitativo si no respetamos a la mitad la población mundial ni le damos participación.
Necesitamos un planeta 50:50 para 2030.
Aquí en Bolivia están dando un buen ejemplo.
Bolivia es uno de los pocos países del mundo que tiene tantas mujeres como hombres en el Parlamento.
Cuando las mujeres y los hombres gobiernan juntos, las decisiones reflejan mejor las diversas necesidades de la sociedad.
Garantizar la participación de la mujer en todos los niveles de la adopción de decisiones es crucial no solo para la igualdad de género, sino también para la democracia y el desarrollo sostenible inclusivos.
Damas y caballeros,
Bolivia se destaca también por promover los derechos de los pueblos indígenas.
Los pueblos indígenas se cuentan entre los más vulnerables y marginados del mundo.
Aun así, su historia, tradiciones, lenguas y conocimientos integran la base misma del patrimonio de la humanidad.
Tenemos mucho que aprender de los pueblos indígenas en nuestra búsqueda de soluciones a los problemas que suponen la lucha contra el cambio climático y la gestión sostenible de los recursos de la Madre Tierra.
La Agenda 2030 para el Desarrollo Sostenible debe garantizar que se respeten los derechos de los pueblos indígenas en todos los Objetivos.
Los pueblos indígenas sufren problemas muy diversos relacionados con su bienestar.
Algunos de esos problemas son el acceso insuficiente a la educación, el saneamiento y la vivienda, la falta de atención prenatal y la violencia generalizada contra la mujer.
Por lo general, no se consulta como se debiera a los pueblos indígenas en los proyectos que se llevan a cabo en sus territorios y que afectan su entorno y sus medios de vida.
Los pueblos indígenas suelen ser los más pobres de su país.
En muchas naciones está aumentando la brecha de la pobreza entre los grupos indígenas y los que no lo son.
Esto es inaceptable.
Cuando pongamos en práctica la Agenda 2030 para el Desarrollo Sostenible, debemos hacerlo teniendo en cuenta la cultura y de manera tal que satisfaga las necesidades de los pueblos indígenas y su concepción del bienestar.
Los pueblos indígenas no deben quedar excluidos.
Damas y caballeros,
Dije antes que Bolivia da voz a la mujer y a los pueblos indígenas.
Pero también defiende con elocuencia a alguien más.
A la Madre Tierra.
Encomio al Gobierno de Bolivia y al Presidente Morales por haber presentado el Día Internacional de la Madre Tierra a la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas en 2009.
Bolivia también ha servido de inspiración para las deliberaciones sobre la Agenda 2030 para el Desarrollo Sostenible con el principio de “vivir bien”.
En su reciente discurso ante la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas, el Presidente Morales explicó qué significa “vivir bien”.
“Vivir bien” es vivir en solidaridad con el ser humano y en armonía con la Madre Tierra.
“Vivir bien” nos recuerda que el bienestar no consiste solo en ventajas materiales, sino en el bienestar social y espiritual.
“Vivir bien” nos recuerda que el bienestar no puede lograrse sin respetar y proteger nuestro planeta.
“Vivir bien” significa que para lograr el desarrollo sostenible tendremos que adaptar nuestro propio estilo de vida.
Estos mismos sentimientos fueron reafirmados también hace poco y con gran elocuencia por Su Santidad el Papa Francisco.
El Papa se dirigió a los líderes del mundo el día en que estos aprobaron la Agenda 2030 para el Desarrollo Sostenible.
Su encíclica reciente pone de relieve el vínculo directo que existe entre cuidar el medio ambiente y atender a los pobres y vulnerables del mundo.
Cuidar a la Madre Tierra es una cuestión moral.
Debemos cambiar la forma en que utilizamos los recursos de la Madre Tierra y vivir de manera sostenible.
Esto se aplica especialmente en el caso del cambio climático.
Ya no podemos permitirnos aspirar a la prosperidad mientras seguimos quemando combustible.
Tenemos que transformar nuestras economías y aprovechar las oportunidades de lograr un futuro con bajas emisiones de carbono.
No hay plan B porque no hay planeta B.
En diciembre, los gobiernos se reunirán en París para ultimar un acuerdo sobre el cambio climático.
Ese acuerdo tiene que ser ambicioso.
Y tiene que incluir a todas las naciones.
Ya no queda margen para seguir procrastinando.
El cambio climático se cierne sobre nosotros.
Ustedes en Cochabamba lo saben bien.
Su pico Tunari solía tener la cumbre nevada todo el año.
Hoy en día, solo tiene nieve unas pocas semanas al año.
Los efectos del cambio climático son evidentes en todo el mundo. Y cada vez mayores.
Sequías. Incendios. Inundaciones. Desprendimientos de tierras.
Derretimiento de los glaciares. Acidificación de los océanos.
La Madre Tierra nos está dando una advertencia.
Debemos escucharla.
Y debemos actuar.
Damas y caballeros,
Sabemos lo que tenemos que hacer para paliar el cambio climático.
Tenemos que llegar a un sólido acuerdo mundial en París que obligue a todos los países a contener las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero y fortalecer la resiliencia.
Y necesitamos que todo el mundo haga su parte: los gobiernos, los grupos de la sociedad civil, las autoridades locales y las empresas.
Todos tenemos una función que cumplir.
París debe ser un punto de inflexión en nuestro esfuerzo colectivo para proteger a la Madre Tierra.
Necesitamos un acuerdo que sea duradero y flexible para que periódicamente los países puedan ir aspirando a más.
Debe ser creíble, transparente y explicable.
Debe dejar bien en claro que la transformación de la economía mundial en una economía con bajas emisiones de carbono es inevitable y beneficiosa y que ya está en marcha.
Los países desarrollados deben facilitar una vía política fiable para cumplir su promesa de contribución de 100.000 millones de dólares al año para 2020.
Esto es esencial para la confianza, la solidaridad y la equidad.
Y antes de París, el Fondo Verde para el Clima debe estar funcionando y aprobando proyectos en los países en desarrollo, en particular en los pequeños Estados insulares en desarrollo y los países menos adelantados.
Estos países se encuentran entre los más afectados por el cambio climático, pero son los que menos han contribuido al problema.
Están en la primera línea del cambio climático y serán los primeros y los que más han de sufrir las consecuencias.
Por todo esto, el cambio climático es una cuestión moral, tanto para esta generación, ahora, como para las generaciones venideras.
Damas y caballeros,
El cambio climático ha sido mi prioridad y mi pasión desde que asumí este cargo.
He asistido a todas las conferencias sobre el clima y he apelado a todos los dirigentes del mundo sin descanso para que tomaran conciencia de cuánto urgen las medidas.
Creo que estamos avanzando, y se vislumbra un pacto transformador en París.
Sin embargo, no debemos dejar de hacer presión.
Contar con el liderazgo de todos ustedes.
Ustedes pueden contar con el mío.
Para concluir, quisiera hacer una promesa que hacen aquí en los Andes.
Se trata de una promesa que pediré a los dirigentes del mundo que hagan con nosotros.
Ama suwa (no seas ladrón).
Ama llulla (no seas mentiroso).
Ama qhilla (no seas perezoso).
No robemos a nuestro planeta.
Deberíamos gestionar sus recursos con prudencia.
No mintamos.
Debemos cumplir los compromisos asumidos de reducir las emisiones, aumentar la resiliencia y llegar a un acuerdo sobre el cambio climático mundial que sea justo y ambicioso.
Por último, ama qhilla.
No escatimemos esfuerzos en nuestro trabajo por un futuro sostenible para los seres humanos y el planeta.
Trabajemos unidos por un mañana mejor y una vida digna para todos los seres humanos, en todo el mundo.
Muchas gracias.
Solpayki (quechua),
Yuspagara (aimara).

1 comment:

Joan Harrison said...

I am thankful that Secretary General Ban Ki-moon regards climate change as a "moral issue." And I am glad that he acknowledges that the paths to reversing climate catastrophe are known. He says, "We need a robust global agreement in Paris that commits all countries to curbing greenhouse gas emissions . . . . " He emphasizes working for a "sustainable future," though he does not say what the word "sustainable" means. And the most important path toward reversing the juggernaut of climate change he neglects to mention at all...cutting out meat and dairy from human diets. He does not mention that animal agriculture is entirely unsustainable. He does not mention the unsustainability and, needless to say, gross immorality of slaughter. He does not mention that 51% of greenhouse gases annually worldwide are from farmed animals. It'd be great if the documentary "Cowspiracy" could be shown at the Paris conference.

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