Monday, April 30, 2018

Thank you for your support for food delivery by O'odham VOICE Against the Wall

Ofelia Rivas, O'odham, purchasing emergency food for O'odham on the border. Photo copyright Jeff Hendricks
O'odham Emergency Food Delivered on Border by O'odham VOICE Against the Wall

Photos and article by Ofelia Rivas
O'odham VOICE against the Wall
Censored News
French translation by Christine Prat

O'odham on the south side of the US/ Mexico international boundary are impacted by recent US Border Patrol restrictions at the San Miguel Gate, a traditional O'odham route.
Community members from Kom Wahia, Wo' osan and Kuwit Wahia are in need of immediate assistance. 
O'odham VOICE Against the WALL made an immediate appeal for assistance to purchase food and delivered it to the families. Thank you for the $200. that was raised. The food was delivered on April 19, 2018.
This effort will continue until a sustainable solution is made. The three communities do not have electricity, Two communities have wells with available water, one community does not have a well and needs to haul water. The water hauling truck has broken down recently. The communities need supplies such as lamp oil and kerosene and propane. Also household supplies such as soap, bathroom tissue, other hygiene supplies, and matches and batteries are needed.
O'odham Solidarity Project, Ofelia's website with PayPal for ongoing food deliveries.
.http://www.solidarity-project.org

Photo copyright Ofelia Rivas.
Photo copyright Ofelia Rivas.



Photo copyright Ofelia Rivas.

Photo copyright Ofelia Rivas.

Photo copyright Ofelia Rivas.

Photo copyright Ofelia Rivas.

Photo copyright Ofelia Rivas.
.
Photo copyright Ofelia Rivas.

Copyright. Photos and article copyright Ofelia Rivas, Censored News. No portion may be published without permission.

Indigenous Women's Delegation in Switzerland Photos -- Camp Zürich Divest Credit Suisse

Camp Zürich Divest Credit SuisseWECAN International Delegation
Photos by Sara Juanita Jumping Eagle, Dakota, and Michelle Cook, Dine'

Monique Michelle Verdin, Houma Councilwoman, on right, demanding
an end to financing of fossil fuels. Verdin is battling the Bayou Bridge 
Pipeline on the Louisiana Gulf Coast. Michelle Cook on left.


Sara Juanita Jumping Eagle, Dakota, and
Waste Win Young, both of Standing Rock, (with friend in center)
battling the Dakota Access Pipeline, its owner, Energy
Transfer Partners, and those who finance and invest in
dirty fuels.
"Indigenous Women’s Delegation - holding Suisse and German financial institutions accountable for their investments in unethical corporations and projects such as Energy Transfer Partners, Dakota Access Pipeline, Bayou Bridge Pipeline, Transmountain pipeline expansion project, and Kinder Morgan." Sara Juanita Jumping Eagle.



Waste Win Young, Dakota of Standing Rock, said, "Zürich and Bern today. Had an action in front of CreditSuisse with Greenpeace. We met with the ministry of foreign affairs and the ministry of labor and economics in Bern. Swiss financial institutions are investing millions of dollars in fossil fuel projects worldwide with companies who are committing indigenous and human rights abuses. Their quality of life comes at the expense of our communities and our sacred places."

"Warrior women demand accountability from Credit Suisse
 for Indigenous Human Rights violations!" -- Michelle Cook


Swiss banks lead dirty fuel financing in Europe

Greenpeace Switzerland published a new report today that revealed that, per capita, Swiss banks provide more funding for fossil fuel companies than any other European country. Read more:
https://www.greenpeace.org/international/press-release/16141/indigenous-people-and-swiss-pensioners-challenge-switzerlands-biggest-banks-on-oil-pipeline-funding/

WECAN Spring 2018 Indigenous Women’s Divestment Delegates comprise both frontline community leaders, and tribal officials who serve or have served in official capacities for their Tribal Nations, including - Charlene Aleck (Elected councillor for Tsleil Waututh Nation, Sacred Trust Initiative, Canada); Dr. Sara Jumping Eagle (Oglala Lakota and Mdewakantonwan Dakota pediatrician, living and working on the Standing Rock Reservation, North Dakota); Michelle Cook (Diné/Navajo, human rights lawyer); Wasté Win Yellowlodge Young (Ihunktowanna/Hunkpapa of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Former Tribal Historic Preservation Officer); and Monique Verdin (Member of south Louisiana’s United Houma Nation Tribal Council and the Another Gulf Is Possible Collaborative) - with Osprey Orielle Lake (WECAN International Executive Director and Delegation organizer).

CONTACT:
Emily Arasim (general inquiries) – emily@wecaninternational.org, +1(505)920-0153
Michelle Cook (general inquiries) - divestinvestprotect@gmail.com
Osprey Orielle Lake (urgent inquiries in Europe) – osprey@wecaninternational.org, +1(415)722-2104


Read more about the delegation:

https://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2018/04/indigenous-womens-delegation-to-europe.html

Saturday, April 28, 2018

Mohawk Nation News 'Great White Auntie Calls in her Chips'

GREAT WHITE AUNTIE CALLS IN HER CHIPS


Mohawk Nation News
MMN. Apr. 28, 2018. “Gurls, time to come and help your auntie so I can keep on being good to you”, coos Carolyn Bennett, Minister of Indian Affairs. The Gurl “Me-Me-Me” Chiefs are being called in for a pep talk by auntie and her cronies about “Recognition and Implementation of Indigenous [Foreign Corporation] Rights”, otherwise called “My way or the highway to the final solution of the Indian problem” [Duncan Campbell Scott]. It’s on April 30, 2018, one day before the Assembly of First Nations AFN, also known as the Assembly of Monkey Business, meets on May 1-2 at the casino in Gatineau-Hull-Ottawa. Auntie Carolyn says, “No, gurls, we’re not taking any chances on what could be your last ride!”
Read article at Mohawk Nation News:

Friday, April 27, 2018

Mohawk Nation News 'AFN 'Hit and Run' Killers!'

AFN “HIT AND RUN” KILLERS!


Please post & distribute. 
MNN. APRIL 26, 2018. The illegal government of Canada, the Assembly of First Nations, band and tribal councils, national, provincial and territorial organizations get their kicks from the sadistic pleasure they enjoy by mistreating us.  They rubber stamp the government’s hit and run atrocities and then they think they can continue to enjoy the destruction of our people.  
Read article http://mohawknationnews.com/blog/2018/04/27/afn-hit-and-run-killers/

Thursday, April 26, 2018

Dineh from Burnham testifies on toxic coal ash in Washington




The Pruitt administration’s assault on our lands will be met with legal ramifications and resistance. -- Dailan Long

Testimony of Dailan Long,
Dineh, Burnham, Navajo Nation
Censored News
Hello, my name is Dailan Long and I represent my Navajo tribal community of Burnham, New Mexico in the four corners region of New Mexico on the Navajo Reservation.  I serve on the Board of Directors for Diné Citizens Against Ruining our Environment and I’m here to state my deep opposition to USEPA proposal to weaken the 2015 coal ash rules:
Firstly, I vehemently oppose EPA’s proposal to reverse the 2015 oversight and compliance measures of coal ash oversight and management.  I speak to this subject as my community currently bears the brunt of toxic coal ash, waste disposal, air pollution, water contamination, and health impacts as a result of the massive coal-extractive industry complex.  As a tribal citizen, I reside along the Chaco River watershed and its tributaries, which are directly affected by the Four Corners Power Plant and adjacent coal ash waste sites located immediately east of Chaco River. These coal ash combustion waste sites are large powdery manmade mounds with discharge leakages flowing into the Chaco River watershed, contaminating our local waterbodies and directly violate traditional Navajo life ways of subsistence. I raise sheep for subsistence, however, this traditional practice amongst myself and other tribal communities are threatened by the contamination of our water resources as a result of coal ash. I must travel 15 miles west of my home to haul water for my livestock as it is common knowledge for tribal residents that we cannot allow our livestock to graze in open-range for fear that animals will consume contaminated toxic water.  New Mexico, and especially, tribal communities are under severe drought advisories and water is scarce, causing us to haul water to maintain traditional Native subsistence and livelihood. There are still many homes within my community without running water. By weakening the 2015 rule, EPA increases the vulnerability of our already limited water resources to further pollution.
Secondly, EPA violates the spirit of “tribal consultation” and reverses the 2015 rule within a 45-day comment period, which undermines the federal government’s fiduciary responsibility to provide oversight over federal process that directly impact tribal communities.   I reside in a region comprised of traditional Navajo individuals whom are Navajo-speaking, some of whom, sacrificed their lives by using our language to defend this country in WWII. EPA ignores these voices by limiting public commenting period for tribal citizens, including our veterans, whom are directly impacted by these proposals. EPA must consider the state and tribal jurisdiction overlap the areas where these coal ash sites exist. EPA puts forth the notion that the state will determine the rules and regulations of tribal lands, which violates the government-to-government tribal consultation that must be completed given the enormity of the proposals implications. Tribal residents experience an ongoing violation of human rights and environmental degradation as a result of pro-industry manipulation of EPA.  It’s clear that EPA’s proposal favors the very weak and manipulative power paradigm that exist in New Mexico and only favors the industry to seek leeways into further pollution and leaving vulnerable tribal populations to bear the brunt of toxic coal ash disposal. At a minimum, EPA must extend its 45-day comment period for proper public participation.
Lastly, EPA does not consider the external costs associated with weakening some of the minimal requirements in the 2015 rule; one of which, is the crippling costs of public health and its impact to a struggling to a tribal economy.  I speak as a Medicaid Service Provider to both tribal and non-tribal medicaid recipients and provide services to vulnerable and high-risks clients. I observe high respiratory illnesses and asthma conditions especially in middle-aged to elderly individuals in our community; many of whom depend on Indian Health Services for medical treatment and long-term care.  The Navajo Nation and State of New Mexico face significant decreases in Medicaid services and Indian Health Services overwhelmingly burdens the cost of treating the very individuals directly affected by coal industry practices such as the contamination of our water supplies, discharge and airborne pollutants. The tribe already burdens the health disparities by trying to provide for medical and long-term needs of its constituents; however, by weakening the 2015 rule, the tribe must also shoulder the toxic waste pits and financial responsibilities for cleanup and land restoration.

Again, I speak from my experience working directly with medicaid recipients and as a tribal resident from a community overburdened by toxic pollution.  The 2015 coal ash rule is currently protects hundreds of American communities despite some weaknesses, however, incrementally sets commonsense standards that protect clean water and safeguard public health.  EPA must reject the notion that industry interest supersedes federal responsibility to consult with indigenous nations and tribes. EPA must also acknowledge the persistence of indigenous populations and that the Pruitt administration’s assault on our lands will be met with legal ramifications and resistance.

Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Mohawk Nation News 'Hey, Chief, What's Your Price?'

L'eau Est La Vie Camp -- Occupying Bayou Bridge Pipeline in Louisiana





BREAKING: Day 2 of occupying the Bayou Bridge Pipeline easement in Youngsville, Louisiana. Water protectors from L'eau est la Vie resistance camp and landowners are fighting together to stop ETP and the Bayou Bridge Pipeline. Construction has been stopped all morning and is expected to be shut down all day. #StopBBP #StopETP #NoBBP#NoBayouBridgePipeline #NoBayouBridge (April 25, 2018)

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Mohawk Nation News 'AFN Terrorism'

AFN TERRORISM


Please post & distribute.
MNN. Apr. 24, 2018. The Assembly of First Nations, the national, provincial and territorial INDIAN organizations and band and tribal councils are terrorist organizations. They use terror as a weapon to help eradicate all native people. Violence and threats are calculated to attain political and economic goals through coercion and fear.  AFN and the others belong on the list of agents of repression who carry out the thuggery for the corporate cartel of the invaders. 

Indigenous Women Urge Divestment in Switzerland -- 'No Fossil Fuel Financing'

Women's Earth and Climate Action Network
·
Indigenous Women Urge Divestment in Switzerland -- 'No Fossil Fuel Financing'



By Women's Earth and Climate Action Network

Censored News


ZURICH (April 23, 2018) -- The third Indigenous Women’s Divestment Delegation to Europe was in Zurich, Switzerland today, meeting with UBS bank to advocate against unethical financing of fossil fuel projects due to Indigenous and human rights violations, and dangers to the health of the global climate.
Delegates are speaking out about Energy Transfer Partners’ Dakota Access and Bayou Bridge Pipelines; Kinder Morgan’s TransMountain Pipeline; and Enbridge’s Line 3 Pipeline, and calling for a just transition now!

(April 24) Delegation in Frankfurt Germany today meeting w/ Deutsche Bank, protecting water, air, and climate and calling for respect for Indigenous right to free,prior and informed consent. It's time for financial institutions to be accountable and for justice to be served.

Spring 2018 Indigenous Women’s Divestment Delegates comprise both frontline community leaders, and tribal officials who serve or have served in official capacities for their Tribal Nations, including - Charlene Aleck (Elected councillor for Tsleil Waututh Nation, Sacred Trust Initiative, Canada); Dr. Sara Jumping Eagle (Oglala Lakota and Mdewakantonwan Dakota pediatrician, living and working on the Standing Rock Reservation, North Dakota); Michelle Cook (Diné/Navajo, human rights lawyer); Wasté Win Yellowlodge Young (Ihunktowanna/Hunkpapa of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Former Tribal Historic Preservation Officer); and Monique Verdin (Member of south Louisiana’s United Houma Nation Tribal Council and the Another Gulf Is Possible Collaborative) - with Osprey Orielle Lake (WECAN International Executive Director and Delegation organizer).

CONTACT:
Emily Arasim (general inquiries) – emily@wecaninternational.org, +1(505)920-0153
Michelle Cook (general inquiries) - divestinvestprotect@gmail.com
Osprey Orielle Lake (urgent inquiries in Europe) – osprey@wecaninternational.org, +1(415)722-2104


Read more about the delegation:
https://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2018/04/indigenous-womens-delegation-to-europe.html

Monday, April 23, 2018

LIVE Border Patrol Agent Found Not Guilty of Murdering Teen -- Crowd Blocking Street in Tucson




Border Patrol agent shot through the border fence into Nogales, Mexico, murdering teen


Border Patrol agent Lonnie Swartz was charged in the October 2012 killing of 16-year-old Jose Antonio Elena Rodríguez of Nogales, Sonora. The agent is accused of firing 16 shots through the Nogales border fence at a group of rock throwers, including Elena Rodríguez, who was hit eight times in the back and twice in the head.

Counting Coup at the United Nations


'No Warriors Forgotten' Speaking out for Justice and Freedom for Leonard Peltier


By Tony Gonzales
AIM West
Censored News

NEW YORK -- The first week of the 17th session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues ended on a positive note for the work done by the delegation of AIM-WEST.   AIM-WEST youth delegates Thorne LaPointe spoke under item #4; Chief Valentin Lopez spoke under item #8; and Ms. Jean Roach spoke on item #10.  

The AIM-WEST delegation also conducted a side-event (workshop) on Wednesday, April 18, in the morning to a overcrowded yet up-beat room. But it wasn’t until Thursday that the voice for Human Rights Defender/ Political Prisoner Leonard Peltier was heard loud and clear under item #10 (and response of solidarity overwhelming!).  So much solidarity was expressed from the floor for Leonard’s case after Ms. Jean Roach spoke that the Chairperson of the UN PFII Ms. Aboubacrine (Tuereg), had to hit the gavel several times to quiet the room!   (see video at 2:32:08).
The speaker representing Leonard Peltier at the PFII, Ms. Jean Roach, who was age 14 during the shoot-out at the Jumping Bull compound in South Dakota on June 26, 1975, read her prepared statement and before completing replied to a statement lodged by the USA representative on Thursday toward the NGO International Indian Treaty Council, for speaking about the incarceration and situation of prisoner Leonard Peltier.

When governments speak in sessions like these at the UN, an NGO generally speaking, are not allowed to reply, only perhaps in an inter-active dialogue setting.  The situation at the UNPFII precipitated by (the) previous intervention fortunately positioned the Leonard Peltier representative (already on the speakers list) to take the floor, allowed/compelled her to defend Leonard’s innocence in the shooting of the two agents by responding/slamming the USA statement, and challenged the USA to their own lies, lies, lies.   i.e.. they don’t even know who did the shooting.

I might add for your attention;  the beginning of this video’s UN PFII session the report given by the UN Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, provides an excellent overview of the current role of extractive industries in a marriage with the military including private security systems (companies) working in tandem against human rights defenders; and worth an ear full!  

Finally, at the very end of the afternoon session see a plea by a Indigenous sister from Canada to the UNPFII giving testimony of how and who killed her brother as Indian lives don’t matter! 

Aho!  All my relations!

Tony Gonzales
AIM-WEST director


Mohawk Nation News 'AFN Eye for an Eye Psychos'


AFN ‘EYE FOR AN EYE’ PSYCHOS



Please post & distribute.
MNN. Apr. 23, 2018. Assembly of First Nations refuse to take responsibility for their part in the genocide of their people. They and their handlers live in beautiful homes, have perfect families, with club houses that look like cathedrals 
with spiraling lobbies that have alters called ATMs and banks.
Read article at Mohawk Nation News:

Sunday, April 22, 2018

O'odham Suffering from Malnutrition Because of Border Restrictions and Arrests


O'odham Suffering from Malnutrition Because of Border Restrictions and Arrests of O'odham by U.S. Border Patrol

By Ofelia Rivas
Censored News

"O'odham in Mexico living on the border have an immediate need for food, at least one O'odham woman is suffering from malnutrition for the second time.
"O'odham Voice Against the Wall is fundraising in order to purchase food in Mexico and deliver to the community." -- Ofelia Rivas, O'odham Voice Against the Wall is fundraising.
Contact Ofelia Rivas at: 4oodhamrights@gmailcom
Donate at her website:
http://www.solidarity-project.org/

Honoring Missing Indigenous People in Fallon, Nevada

Photos by Western Shoshone Carl Bad Bear Sampson


Add caption






Photos by Bad Bear Sampson, Western Shoshone

Article by Brenda Norrell
Censored News

FALLON, Nevada -- In a town with a history of racism and violence toward Native people -- Fallon, Nevada -- Native Americans gathered to remember and honor Indigenous Missing People, just across from the courthouse and police station.
Buck Sampson, Paiute elder, said, "Indigenous Missing People gathered at Williams Avenue and Main Street, Saturday.
"Good turn out this afternoon. Lots of powerful Prayers today, and the healing of some of the Women started today. They want to keep this prayer going everyday, especially for the talking circles and prayer circles in Lovelock, Fallon,  Stillwater, Wadsworth, Schurz, Pyramid Lake, Yomba, Reno, and Carson City."
"It was real spiritual and uplifting with good songs and singers, well represented by the American Indian Movement," Buck Sampson told Censored News. 


Copryight photos Carl Sampson, article Censored News. May not be republished without permission.