August 2020

Indigenous Peoples and Human Rights

Thursday, May 26, 2022

Wixarika Walked 32 Days to Mexico City for Return of their Land: Press Conference Today


.



On April 25, 2022, more than 200 members of the community of San Sebastián Teponahuaxtlán and its annex Tuxpan de Bolaños, belonging to the Wixárika people and located in the municipalities of Mezquitic and Bolaños, Jalisco, started a caravan on foot that seeks to reach to Mexico City and demand from the head of the federal executive power the restitution of more than 11,000 hectares of communal land located on the borders of Jalisco and Nayarit.

Wixárika Dignity and Consciousness Caravan Program in Mexico City

“Our feet are tired, but we are more tired of waiting for justice so that our lands are restored to us."

 May 26

5:00 a.m. Exit of the Marchioness, Route: Constituyentes, Highway Reforma Interior Circuit
1:00 p.m. Reception of the Caravan at the Antimonument at 43
2:00 p.m. Press conference at the Antimonument at 43
16:00 hrs Restarts the Caravan to the Basilica of Guadalupe
Route: Reforma Calzada de Guadalupe
18:00 hrs Arrival at the Basilica of Guadalupe
8:00 p.m. Overnight on the esplanade of the Basilica

Fort Berthold's Oil and Gas Wells: Toxins Endanger Thousands of Children and Adults


Flares burn on the Fort Berthold Indian on Oct. 27, 2021. Credit: Isaac Stone Simonelli/Howard Center for Investigative Journalism

NEW ANALYSIS: Oil and gas production in North Dakota threatens the health of 38,239 residents including 10,660 children 
Map Data Shows EPA Must Strengthen Newly Proposed Safeguards to Protect Public Health, Climate

Dakota Resource Council
Sean Arithson, Communications Coordinator sean@drcinfo.com
Earthworks Alan Septoff, Earthworks | aseptoff@earthworksaction.org

BISMARCK, North Dakota -- A new geospatial analysis released by Earthworks today shows 38,239 residents, including 10,660 children, reside near or attend schools or daycares within a ½ mile threat radius of active oil and gas operations in North Dakota.

This analysis comes as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) works to finalize their widely supported proposed safeguards to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and associated toxic air pollution from new and existing oil and gas facilities and as they prepare to introduce a supplemental rule to address routine flaring and smaller leak-prone wells.

“The Oil and Gas Threat Map confirms what those of us living on Fort Berthold Reservation already know, North Dakota’s Oil and Gas development puts tens of thousands of adults and children in harm's way. Our state, federal, and tribal governments and regulators must reign in this industry and protect the air we breathe. I urge EPA and BLM agencies to take this opportunity and put an end to routine flaring and venting which plague our communities.” Lisa DeVille, Mandaree, ND Board member Dakota Resource Council and Fort Berthold Protectors of Water and Earth Rights.

In the United States, oil and gas production is the largest industrial methane polluter, a greenhouse gas at least 80 times more powerful than carbon dioxide. Peer-reviewed science shows that toxic pollutants released along with methane from oil and gas facilities puts people at risk for cancer, respiratory illness, fetal defects, blood disorders, and neurological problems ––and that risk increases for children and the elderly.

A fact sheet detailing map-based data can be found attached, for your reporting.
The Oil and Gas Threat Map displays information about those living within a half-mile of oil and gas facilities in North Dakota and other states. Although scientific literature shows that health impacts are also associated at distances greater than ½ mile, the analysis conservatively uses ½ mile because it is the distance at which these impacts have been most clearly correlated. The Oil and Gas Threat Map will also display data about the risk of increased cancer and respiratory health rates at the county level. In addition to the data that the Oil and Gas Threat Map presents, users can enter their own addresses to see if they live in a threat zone.

To access the map, visit oilandgasthreatmap.com.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
Upon request, we can provide the following:
Media interviews with local advocates and experts
Walk-through of the map-based analysis
Peer-reviewed science behind the ½ mile threat radius

###
Dakota Resource Council’s mission is to promote sustainable use of North Dakota’s natural resources and family-owned and operated agriculture by building member-led local groups that empower people to influence the decision-making processes that affect their lives and communities.

www.drcinfo.com

Wednesday, May 25, 2022

Mohawk Nation News 'Mohawk Mothers Give Red Light to Royal Vic Project'

MOHAWK MOTHERS GIVE RED LIGHT TO ROYAL VIC PROJECT Audio

Mohawk Nation News 

Audio at MNN

https://mohawknationnews.com/blog/2022/05/24/mohawk-mothers-give-red-light-to-royal-vic-project-audio/

MNN. May 25, 2022. This is all about theft of indigenous land. Never mentioned in the OCPM report or news stories today is that all the land is unceded kahnienkehaka mohawk territory since time immemorial. Land is the only issue. No invader can produce ownership or rightful occupation of any land on turtle island. They are trespassers. Only the indigenous can give permission for everything. We are placed here by creation since time immemorial.  Mainstream media misled the public by saying that the project got the “green light” when OCPM has no decision-making power. The kahnistensera on the other hand have all the power [kasastenserakowa sa oiera] and have given the red light to this project of the foreigners to our lands.

Montreal Mayor said: “We need to make sure, if there’s any doubts, if we think that maybe there’s potentially graves there, we need to do it right” https://globalnews.ca/video/8866727/plans-for-old-royal-victoria-hospital-get-approval-stamp-despite-opposition/ They propose to set up a museum to display our remains to glorify the murders they have committed as a tourist attraction! 

Tuesday, May 24, 2022

New Report: Dine' in San Juan Basin Live Dangerously Close to Oil and Gas Wells


These natural gas wells in the San Juan Basin of northwest New Mexico glow as excess gas is flared from the wells.
Credit: WildEarth Guardians/flickr


May 24, 2022
Contact: Alan Septoff for Earthworks, aseptoff@earthworksaction.org, 202-271-2355
Camilla Feibelman, Sierra Club - Rio Grande Chapter camilla.feibelman@sierraclub.org, 505.715.8388

NEW ANALYSIS: 144,377 New Mexicans, including 38,749 children, Threatened by Oil and Gas Industry Air Pollution

Map Data Shows EPA Must Strengthen Newly Proposed Safeguards to Protect Public Health, Climate, following New Mexico’s lead

Carlsbad, NM - A new geospatial analysis released by Earthworks today shows 144,377 New Mexicans including 38,749 children, reside near or attend schools or daycares within a ½ mile threat radius of active oil and gas operations. In the San Juan Basin nearly 80% of the population lives within this radius. In the NM Permian Basin the map shows a nearly 40% increase in Eddy County alone of people living within the threat radius since 2017. This analysis comes as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) works to finalize their widely supported proposed safeguards to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and associated toxic air pollution from new and existing oil and gas facilities and as they prepare to introduce a supplemental rule to address routine flaring and smaller leak-prone wells. New Mexico's recently finalized methane and ozone precursor rules set a strong floor for federal rules that would protect all communities like those in Texas, where regulations are limited, and along its border in New Mexico.

Dine' Elsie Begay honored with Honorary Lifetime Achievement Award at International Uranium Film Festival



Navajo Grandmother Elsie Begaye honored with Honorary Lifetime Achievement Award
by International Uranium Film Festival

By Brenda Norrell
Censored News
Watch video of the presentation
Watch the movie 'The Return of Navajo Boy'

"The people could have still been alive," says Dine' Grandmother Elsie Begay as she describes how Dine' were never told about the dangers of radiation and uranium mining. 

"This movie not only brought back my brother, but it is helping people," Begay said of the movie, 'Return of Navajo Boy.'

Dine' grandmother Elsie Begay, 83, of Monument Valley was honored with the Honorary Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Uranium Film Festival. Begay received her award in Dine' and English languages yesterday.


Censored News copyright

All content at Censored News is copyrighted by the creator of the work, and may not be used for any reason without written permission. This includes news, books, films, dissertations, grants, reports, pamphlets, and any other purpose.