August 2020

Indigenous Peoples and Human Rights

Saturday, July 17, 2010

Black Hills Sioux Nation Treaty Council submission on UN Declaration

Greetings from the International Justice Program of Owe Aku, Bring Back the Way,

As most of you know, the State Department of the United States has begun a review of its position on the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The State Department arranged for "consultations with federally recognized Indian tribes and meetings with interested nongovernmental organizations and other stakeholders."
The Lakota Nation by the Black Hills Sioux Nation Treaty Council four-page letter begins with:
"Greetings from the Black Hills Sioux Nation Treaty Council (“BHTC”). The BHTC represents the Lakota people in our sovereign relationship with the United States of American as preserved in the Fort Laramie Treaties of 1851 and 1868. We come now to address you regarding the review and “consultation” process under which the people of the United States of America, through you, their representatives, are considering the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (“DRIP”). We wish to address two points in particular:
1. “Consultations” with Indian Reorganization Act governments under the supervision of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (“BIA”) established in 1934 on Indian territories in violation of due process and the treaty relationship between our governments, are not authorized or qualified to discuss issues relating to the nation-to-nation relationship, treaties or international rights; and
2. The people of the United States of America, to maintain its claim as a just-minded nation with respect for diverse peoples of the world and the human rights of those peoples, must give unqualified support to the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples."
Please feel free to contact us with any questions or comments. Kent Lebsock, Coordinator, Owe Aku International Justice Program oweakuinternational@me.com
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Read statement of the Black Hills Sioux Nation Treaty Council to State Department:
http://censored-news.blogspot.com/2010/07/black-hills-sioux-nation-treaty-council.html
Photo Chief Red Cloud

Modoc Nation: Statement UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

Censored News,

I am forwarding this to you for your consideration in publishing it in Censored News. It is the Modoc Nation’s statement in response to the State Department’s request for comments on the United States reexamination of its position on the United Nations Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Please note that the Modoc Tribe (of southern Oregon and northern California), now known as the Modoc Nation is the first and, perhaps, still the only native nation/tribe in the Americas to draft its own statement of indigenous rights based on the UNDRIP, ours being drafted on November 20, 2008.
Blessings,
Two Eagles (Perry Chesnut)
Secretary of State, Modoc Nation
================================================================================
July 15, 2010
The Honorable Hillary Rodham Clinton
Secretary of State, United States of America
In care of: S/SR Global Intergovernmental Affairs
U.S. Department of State
2201 C Street NW., Suite 1317
Washington, DC 20520.
Re: Consultations with federally recognized tribes on the United States Government’s reexamination of its position on the United Nations Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

The Modoc Nation (formerly known as the Modoc Tribe) is a federally recognized tribe listed in the Federal Register under the label “Klamath Tribes.” This misnomer that groups three separate sovereign federally recognized indigenous tribes under a single name, is a serious problem for us that goes to the heart of our sovereignty and our identity and survival as a unique people and culture. The “Klamath Tribes” is not a single tribe; rather it is a name used to refer to the confederation of three separate tribes: the Klamath Tribe, the Modoc Tribe, and the Yahooskin Band of Snake Indians. Our sovereignty and federal recognition stems from the Lakes Treaty of 1864, and although federal recognition was terminated in 1954, it was restored to us in the Klamath Tribe Restoration Act of 1986. No act of Congress, Executive Order, or any constitution that has been used by any of the three tribes has dissolved the sovereignty of any of them or merged them into a single tribe.
Read full text of statements:

Sports Illustrated: Pride of a Nation, Iroquois Lacrosse

Sports Illustrated: Pride of a Nation
Iroquois Lacrosse featured in current issue

The July 19 issue of Sports Illustrated hits newstands this week. Included in the magazine is a feature story by S.L. Price detailing the relationship between the game of lacrosse and Iroquois culture entitled "Pride of a Nation."

Price talked to several current and former Syracuse players and coaches for the story and visited the Onondaga reservation last month. Among those Price interviewed were rising senior midfielder Jeremy Thompson, Orange head coach John Desko, Brett and Freeman Bucktooth, Oren Lyons, Sid Smith, Roy Simmons III and Roy Simmons Jr.

Also see:
Iroquois Nationals Lacrosse website:
http://iroquoisnationals.org/