Saturday, July 31, 2010

40th Anniversary Commemorating the Takeover of Mount Rushmore


40th Anniversary Commemorating The Takeover of Mount Rushmore
August 29, 2010
10 am to 6 pm
Location Mount Rushmore National Memorial
13000 Hwy 244 Bldg 31 Suite 1
Created By United Native Americans, Inc, A Gay Kingman
We Invite You To Both Attend and Participate In Our Upcoming Tribal Sovereignty Forum at Mount Rushmore.
This Coming August 29, 2010 will mark the 40th Anniversary of the historic Reclaiming of Our Sacred Paha Sapa (Black Hills of 1970). On this day, we will gather at the Amphitheater at Mount Rushmore National Memorial in Keystone, South Dakota to reflect upon the 1970 occupation in a spiritual way, to renewing friendships and bonds formed at that time. We come to pray, to educate The Youth about the Importance of Protecting Our Sacred Sites, and to use this opportunity for our people to be near the place of our origin, the Paha Sapa.
Additionally, we hope to coordinate Tribal Leaders who will discuss the needs of our People and move forward with real resolutions to The Issues Each Reservation Has. Such as Better Health Care on Our Reservations, Schools and Colleges, Red Road Teachings, Language Preservation, Suicide Prevention, Treaty Rights, Tribal Police Force, Water Preservation, Better Housing, Renewable energy's. Traditional dancers and Drums are Welcome to participate.
Confirmed to speak:
*Lehman L. Brightman-President of UNA-Leader of The Take Over of Mount Rushmore 1970.
*A.Gay Kingman-Executive Director of The Great Plains Tribal Chairman's Association.
*Richie Richards-UC Berkeley
*Paul Robertson-Oglala Lakota College
*Barbara Elk-Writer, Poet
*Kiera-Dawn Kolson-singer,songwriter,motivational speaker
We are extending open invitations to the Inter-Tribal Community and their families to join us, in this historic and educational event. Please RSVP at (605) 484-3036 or (510)672-7187
Our Event Is 100% Free. But, Persons Driving to and from Our Event Must Pay For Parking. There will be a car pool from the Mother Butler Community Center to Mt.Rushmore. For those who wish to car pool you can contact:
Les Old Lodge: (605)491-0651 or lesoldlodge@gmail.com
Parking Fee:
$10.00 - Annual Pass (Cars,Motorcycles and RV's)
$50.00 Commercial Bus - Day
Also there will be a community feed, for those of you who would like to donate food please contact:
Christy Ryan:(605)431-6358 or Cjryan07@yahoo.com
For More Information On How To Donate, Sponsor, Present a Work Shop and or Be a Participate.
Please Contact:
A. Gay Kingman, M.Ed. Executive Director
Member, Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe
Great Plains Tribal Chairman's Association
1926 Stirling St., Rapid City, SD 57702
Cell: (605)-484-3036 Fax: (605)-343-3074
E-mail: KingmanWapato@rushmore.com
or
Quanah Parker Brightman
VP of United Native Americans, Inc., 2434 Faria Ave, Pinole, CA 94564, Cell: (510)-672-7187
qbrightman75@hotmail.com
Professor Lehman L. Brightman-National President of U.N.A. Speech on the Capital Steps in Washington D.C. at the conclusion of the Longest Walk 1978
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o86w-erjlgQ
Historical Overview & Resolutions
1978: Eleven legislative bills introduced in the 95th U.S. Congress would have abrogated Native Treaties that protect remaining Native sovereignty. The Longest Walk of 1978 was a peaceful, spiritual effort to educate the public about Native American rights and the Native way of life. Native American Treaty Rights under the U.S. Constitution are to be honored as the supreme law of the land. The 3,600 mile walk was successful in its purpose: to gather enough support to halt proposed legislation abrogating Indian treaties with the U.S. government. Shortly After, The American Indian Religious Freedom Act (AIRFA) of 1978 was passed. As a result of The 1978 Longest Walk, Indigenous people were granted the federal legislative right to freedom of religion, a fundamental right guaranteed to all Americans under the U.S. Constitution.

40-50% of All Indian Women have been Sterilized. Evidence of massive sterilization of American Indians has been revealed by the (GAO) General Accounting Office in a study for ex-Senator James Abourezk from South Dakota in 1976. Most of these women were sterilized without their informed consent. The Same GOA Report also revealed that Indian Children are being used as "human guinea pigs," by the Federal Government in 56 different medical experiments (in most cases without parental consent). The Abourezk Report found that approximately 3,406 Indian Women had been sterilized in a three year period between 1973 and 1976, in only four states. Lehman L. Brightman, President of United Native Americans,Inc. estimates that between 60,000 and 70,000 Indian Women have been sterilized in the last twelve years. Most of the Indian Women were sterilized "unknowingly." and without their informed consent, and in many cases by outright intimidation. In many cases women were told they were going to die if they had more children, that they had cysts on their ovaries, or that the operation was reversible. Voluntary sterilization among the general population of the U.S. of some 200 million people isn't going to wipe out the country, but in smaller groups like the American Indians, it could wipe them out forever, as an example: If Every white woman in the state of California was sterilized, the white race in North America would not be in danger, but if every California Indian Women was sterilized, the Genocide of California Indians would be Permanent. President Carter has Refused on 3 different occasions to stop the sterilization and to remove Dr. Emery Johnson, the Director of the Indian Health Service. . .The man most responsible for Indian Sterilization.
For More of The REAL History on the Longest Walk of 1978 Visit: http://www.myspace.com/thelongestwalk30yearanniv
United Native Americans, Inc.

Hopi Tribal Council approves controversial carbon sequestration without community consultation

Hopiland: Public Forum on Carbon Sequestration and Snowbowl
The Hopi Tribal Council recently approved an experimental Carbon Capture Sequestration (CO2 Sequestration) project on Hopi lands without consultation with tribal members. This project will also impact Navajo lands. The U. S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service recentlyapproved the use of affluent water to make artificial snow at the Snow Bowl Ski Resort on the San Francisco Peaks in Flagstaff, AZ. The COALition invites everyone to come learn about these issues and how our lands and environment may be affected by these projects. This is an opportunity for everyone to share their comments that we can take to our tribal councils.
Topics will include:
What is Carbon Capture Sequestration?
What is the project that Hopi Tribal Council approved?
If allowed to proceed, what are the potential impacts on our lands and our water?
What is the effect of artificial snow making on the San Francisco Peaks?
Discussions on Environmental Effects, Cultural Effects & Economic ImpactsWhat options are available to Hopi and Navajo Nations to address these issues?
Open Microphone – All Public Testimonials Welcome.
Everyone is Welcome!

AGENDA
Public Forum on Carbon Capture Sequestration & Snow Bowl

Sponsored by Inter-Tribal COALition
August 6, 2010 – 9:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Hotevilla Youth & Elderly Center
Hopi Indian Reservation
9:30 a.m. Registration
10:00 a.m. Purpose of Public Forum Ben Nuvamsa & Milton
 Introduction of Inter-Tribal COALition Bluehouse (COALition
 Goals for the Public Forum Members)
10:15 a.m. Carbon Sequestration: What is it? Ben Nuvamsa, Vernon
 Review of Hopi Tribal Council Action to Approve Masayesva, Tulley Haswood,
Carbon Sequestration Ed Becenti, Other Presenters
 What is the Proposal? How will it work?
 How does this affect Hopi and Navajo People?
 What are Environmental, Cultural and Economic Impacts?
 Explanation and Justification by Nada Talayumptewa
of the Hopi Water & Energy Team (invited)
 Reaction from Hopi & Dine’ Elders
(Presentations will be videotaped and recorded)
12:00 p.m. Lunch
1:30 p.m. People’s Action Item and Mandates to Tribal Councils Forum Facilitator:
 Open Microphone for People’s Comments Various Presenters
(Presentations will be videotaped and recorded)
 Presentation of Tribal Council Action Item
and Draft Council Resolution
3:00 p.m. Artificial Snow Making at Snow Bowl: Forum Facilitator:
 What is the Snow Bowl Operators Plan? Howard Shanker, Esq (Invited)
 Status of Litigation Various Presenters
 What options are available to tribes?
 Explanation and Justification by Nada Talayumptewa
of the Hopi Water & Energy Team (Invited) for
signing the letter to Secretary, Department of
Agriculture supporting use of groundwater for
artificial snow making
 Open Microphone for People’s Comments
(Presentations will be videotaped and recorded)
 Presentation of Tribal Council Action Item
4:30 p.m. Adjourn

Navajo Hopi Observer: Hopi Council approves carbon capture storage project
Rosanda Suetopka Thayer/The Observer
Excerpt:
KYKOTSMOVI, Ariz. - In a surprise move, the Hopi Tribal Council approved a controversial project with an 8 to 4 vote, giving four western energy companies (WEC Consortium) and the Hopi Tribe the go-ahead to evaluate geologic characteristics of the Black Mesa Basin for potential commercial storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in a new method known as carbon capture sequestration (CCS).
The proposed project seeks to drill a series of exploration wells on Hopi land for the purpose of collecting and analyzing detailed geological, geophysical and water quality data. Wells will be drilled to a depth of approximately 9,000 feet to determine if the rock strata is hospitable enough to store toxic CO2 extracted from coal plant emissions underground on Hopi and near Navajo reservation communities.
Read article:
http://www.navajohopiobserver.com/main.asp?SectionID=1&SubSectionID=1&ArticleID=12711

Wednesday, July 28, 2010

Photo: Rain clouds over Navajoland

Photo: Rain clouds over Navajoland. Photo by Brenda Norrell.

UN: American Indian Issues, Elimination of Racial Discrimination

Action Alert

AMERICAN INDIAN ISSUES,
THE INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION ON THE
ELIMINATION OF ALL FORMS OF
RACIAL DISCRIMINATION and
UNITED NATIONS REVIEW OF THE UNITED STATES RECORD


By James Zion
Photos: Chili Yazzie and Willie Littlechild in Geneva by James Zion

July 28, 2010
The United States of America ratified the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms
of Racial Discrimination (entry into force 4 January 1969), an international human rights treaty that
is the "law of the land" under the Constitution. Article 9(b) of the Convention requires the United
States to report its compliance with the Convention every two years or on the call of the Committee
on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. The United States submitted its last reports late, and
they were heard by the Committee in February of2008. It is time for another report.
The Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination has been giving special attention to the
United Nations Declaration on the Right of Indigenous Peoples as an international instrument that
sets human rights norms, and it gave special attention to Indian rights when reviewing the United
States' report. See Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, Concluding
observations of the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, United States of
America, CERDI USA lCOl6 (8 May 2008).
The Committee found, at,-r26, that there was a high incidence of violence and abuse against women
belonging to national minorities, and particularly American Indian and Alaska Native women. It also
noted "the alleged insufficient will of federal and state authorities to take action with regard to such
violence" and in particular Native American women, including "their right of access to justice and
the right to obtain adequate reparation or satisfaction." Based on that the Committee made four areas
of recommendations. We can measure non-compliance with the Convention in terms of the failure
of the United States to adequately address the recommendations, particularly in recent Indian
Country crime legislation that does not provide for criminal jurisdiction against all offenders and
abusers and does not give adequate financial support for law enforcement, judicial remedies and
support for women and child victims. The report also asks the United States to give information on
what it has done to implement the recommendations in terms of numbers of victims and perpetrators,
convictions, and the types of sanctions imposed in its next report.
The Committee also gave special attention to reports about extractive industry, including nuclear
testing, toxic and dangerous waste storage, mining or logging, that are carried out in areas "of
spiritual and cultural significance to Native Americans," and the negative impact on their enjoyment
of rights under the Convention. Id.,-r 29. Based on that, the Committee recommended that the
United States must "take all appropriate measures, in consultation with indigenous peoples
1
concerned and their representatives'" to ensure that such activities do not have a negative impact.
The Committee also recommended that the United States recognize the right of Native Americans
"to participate in decisions affecting them, and consult and cooperate in good faith with the
indigenous peoples' "before adopting and implementing any activity in areas of spiritual and cultural
significance to Native Americans."
The Committee also used the recommendations in ~ 29 to urge the United States to look to the
Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples "as a guide to interpret the State party's obligations
under the Convention [to eliminate all form of racial discrimination] relating to indigenous peoples."
Finally, the Committee noted the "adverse effects of economic activities connected with the
exploitation of natural resources in countries outside the United States by transnational corporations
registered in the State party on the right to land, health, living environment and the way of life of
indigenous peoples living in those regions." Jd., ~ 30. It recommended State action to address the
problem. Given the human rights foundations of the recommendations, they equally apply to the
activities of multinational corporations in activities impacting indigenous peoples within the United
States.
While such is not in the record, a member of the Committee told the United States delegation, when
delivering the Committee's comments, that it wanted a report on the status of the Navajo-Hopi Land
Dispute in the next report under the Convention.
The next U.S. report is due on 25 February 2011 and the Committee asked that it should "address
all points raised in the present concluding observations." Jd., ~ 29. The will have to address all
points, including use of the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples" and other violations
of indigenous rights.
James W. Zion
Relevant portions of the Committee report are attached.
* * *
1 Current United States "consultation" activities in proposed consultation policies and
legislation excludes "representatives" such as non-governmental organizations and nonprofits.
2 The Committee used the term "indigenous peoples" rather than "tribes" to catch all
groups (including Metis and Native Hawaiians, e.g.) and to include NGOs, nonprofits and
grassroots organizations.
2
UNITED
NATIONS CERD
International Convention
on the Elimination
of all Forms of
Racial Discrimination
Distr.
GENERAL
CERD/C/uSA/CO/6
8 May 2008
Original: ENGLISH
COMMITTEE ON THE ELIMINATION
OF RACIAL DISCRIMINATION
Seventy-second session
Geneva, 18 February - 7 March 2008
CONSIDERATION OF REPORTS SUBMITTED BY STATES PARTIES
UNDER ARTICLE 9 OF THE CONVENTION
Concluding observations of the Committee on the
Elimination of Racial Discrimination
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
1. The Committee considered the fourth, fifth and sixth periodic reports of the United
States of America, submitted in a single document (CERD/C/uSA/6), at its 1853rd and
1854th meetings (CERD/C/SR.1853 and 1854), held on 21 and 22 February 2008. At its
I 870th meeting (CERD/CISR.1870), held on 5 March 2008, it adopted the following
concluding observations.
A. Introduction
2. The Committee welcomes the reports, and the opportunity to continue an open and
constructive dialogue with the State party. The Committee also expresses appreciation for
the detailed responses provided to the list of issues, as well as for the efforts made by the
high-level delegation to answer the wide range of questions raised during the dialogue.
B. Positive aspects
3. The Committee welcomes the acknowledgement of the multi-racial, multi-ethnic,
and multi-cultural nature of the State party.
4. The Committee notes with satisfaction the work carried out by the various executive
departments and agencies of the State party which have responsibilities in the field of the
elimination of racial discrimination, including the Civil Rights Division of the U.S.
Department of Justice, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and the
Department of Housing and Urban Development (RUD).
GE.08-41982
CERD/C/uSAlCO/6
page 8
The Committee therefore urges the State party to adopt all necessary
measures to guarantee the right of foreign detainees held as "enemy
combatants" to judicial review of the lawfulness and conditions of
detention, as well as their right to remedy for human rights violations. The
Committee further requests the State party to ensure that non-citizens
detained or arrested in the fight against terrorism are effectively protected
by domestic law, in compliance with international human rights, refugee
and humanitarian law.
25. While recognising the efforts made by the State party to combat the pervasive
phenomenon of police brutality, the Committee remains concerned about allegations of
brutal ity and use of excessive or deadly force by law enforcement officials against persons
belonging to racial, ethnic or national minorities, in particular Latino and African American
persons and undocumented migrants crossing the U.S.-Mexico border. The Committee also
notes with concern that despite the efforts made by the State party to prosecute law
enforcement officials for criminal misconduct, impunity of police officers responsible for
abuses allegedly remains a widespread problem (arts. 5 (b) and 6).
The Committee recommends that the State party increase significantly its
efforts to eliminate police brutality and excessive use of force against
persons belonging to racial, ethnic or national minorities, as well as
undocumented migrants crossing the U.S.-Mexico border, inter alia, by
establishing adequate systems for monitoring police abuses and developing
further training opportunities for law enforcement officials. The
Committee further requests the State party to ensure that reports of police
brutality and excessive use of force are independently, promptly and
thoroughly investigated and that perpetrators are prosecuted and
appropriately punished.
26. While welcoming the various measures adopted by the State party to prevent and
punish violence and abuse against women belonging to racial, ethnic and national minorities,
the Committee remains deeply concerned about the incidence of rape and sexual violence
experienced by women belonging to such groups, particularly with regard to American
Indian and Alaska Native women and female migrant workers, especially domestic workers.
The Committee also notes with concern that the alleged insufficient will of federal and state
authorities to take action with regard to such violence and abuse often deprives victims
belonging to racial, ethnic and national minorities, and in particular Native American
women, of their right to access to justice and the right to obtain adequate reparation or
satisfaction for damages suffered (arts. 5 (b) and 6).
The Committee recommends that the State party increase its efforts to
prevent and punish violence and abuse against women belonging to racial,
ethnic and national minorities, inter alia, by:
(i) Setting up and adequately funding prevention and early
assistance centres, counselling services and temporary shelters;
CERD/C/uSAlCO/6
page 9
(ii) Providing specific training for those working within the criminal
justice system, including police officers, lawyers, prosecutors and
judges, and medical personnel;
(iii) Undertaking information campaigns to raise awareness among
women belonging to racial, ethnic and national minorities about
the mechanisms and procedures provided for in national
legislation on racism and discrimination; and
(iv) Ensuring that reports of rape and sexual violence against women
belonging to racial, ethnic and national minorities, and in
particular Native American women, are independently, promptly
and thoroughly investigated, and that perpetrators are
prosecuted and appropriately punished.
The Committee requests the State party to include information on the
results of these measures and on the number of victims, perpetrators,
convictions, and the types of sanctions imposed, in its next periodic report.
27. The Committee remains concerned about the disparate impact that existing felon
disenfranchisement laws have on a large number of persons belonging to racial, ethnic and
national minorities, in particular African American persons, who are disproportionately
represented at every stage of the criminal justice system. The Committee notes with
particular concern that in some states, individuals remain disenfranchised even after the
completion of their sentences (art. 5 (c)).
Taking into account the disproportionate impact that the implementation
of disenfranchisement laws has on a large number of persons belonging to
racial, ethnic and national minorities, in particular African American
persons, the Committee recommends that the State Party adopt all
appropriate measures to ensure that the denial of voting rights is used only
with regard to persons convicted of the most serious crimes, and that the
right to vote is in any case automatically restored after the completion of
the criminal sentence.
28. The Committee regrets that despite the various measures adopted by the State party
to enhance its legal and institutional mechanisms aimed at combating discrimination,
workers belonging to racial, ethnic and national minorities, in particular women and
undocumented migrant workers, continue to face discriminatory treatment and abuse in the
workplace, and to be disproportionately represented in occupations characterized by long
working hours, low wages, and unsafe or dangerous conditions of work. The Committee also
notes with concern that recent judicial decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court - including
Hoffman Plastics Compound, Inc. v. NLRB (2007), Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tire and Rubber
Co. (2007) and Long Island Care at Home, Ltd. v. Coke (2007) - have further eroded the
ability of workers belonging to racial, ethnic and national minorities to obtain legal
protection and redress in cases of discriminatory treatment at the workplace, unpaid or
withheld wages, or work-related injury or illnesses (arts. 5 (e) (i) and 6).
CERD/C/uSAlCO/6
page 10
The Committee recommends that the State party take all appropriate
measures, including increasing the use of "pattern and practice"
investigations, to combat de facto discrimination in the workplace and
ensure the equal and effective enjoyment by persons belonging to racial,
ethnic and national minorities of their rights under article 5 (e) of the
Convention. The Committee further recommends that the State party take
effective measures, including the enactment of legislation, such as the
proposed Civil Rights Act of 2008,- to ensure the right of workers
belonging to racial, ethnic and national minorities, including
undocumented migrant workers, to obtain effective protection and
remedies in case of violation of their human rights by their employer.
29. The Committee is concerned about reports relating to activities, such as nuclear
testing, toxic and dangerous waste storage, mining or logging, carried out or planned in areas
of spiritual and cultural significance to Native Americans, and about the negative impact that
such activities allegedly have on the enjoyment by the affected indigenous peoples of their
rights under the Convention (arts. 5 (d) (v), 5 (e) (iv) and 5 (e) (vi».
The Committee recommends that the State party take all appropriate
measures, in consultation with indigenous peoples concerned and their
representatives chosen in accordance with their own procedure, - to
ensure that activities carried out in areas of spiritual and cultural
significance to Native Americans do not have a negative impact on the
enjoyment of their rights under the Convention.
The Committee further recommends that the State party recognize the
right of Native Americans to participate in decisions affecting them, and
consult and cooperate in good faith with the indigenous peoples concerned
before adopting and implementing any activity in areas of spiritual and
cultural significance to Native Americans. While noting the position of the
State party with regard to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of
Indigenous Peoples (A/RES/611295), the Committee finally recommends
that the declaration be used as a guide to interpret the State party's
obligations under the Convention relating to indigenous peoples.
30. The Committee notes with concern the reports of adverse effects of economic
activities connected with the exploitation of natural resources in countries outside the United
States by transnational corporations registered in the State party on the right to land, health,
living environment and the way of life of indigenous peoples living in these regions (arts. 2
(1) (d) and 5 (e».
In light of article 2, paragraph 1 (d), and 5 (e) of the Convention and of its
general recommendation No. 23 (1~97) on the rights of indigenous peoples,
the Committee encourages the State party to take appropriate legislative
or administrative measures to prevent acts of transnational corporations
registered in the State party which negatively impact on the enjoyment of
rights of indigenous peoples in territories outside the United States. In
CERD/C/uSA/CO/6
page 11
particular, the Committee recommends that the State party explore ways
to hold transnational corporations registered in the United States
accountable. The Committee requests the State party to include in its next
periodic report information on the effects of activities of transnational
corporations registered in the United States on indigenous peoples abroad
and on any measures taken in this regard.
31. The Committee, while noting the efforts undertaken by the State party and civil
society organizations to assist the persons displaced by Hurricane Katrina of2005, remains
concerned about the disparate impact that this natural disaster continues to have on low income
African American residents, many of whom continue to be displaced after more than
two years after the hurricane (art. 5 (e) (iii)).
The Committee recommends that the State party increase its efforts in
order to facilitate the return of persons displaced by Hurricane Katrina to
their homes, if feasible, or to guarantee access to adequate and affordable
housing, where possible in their place of habitual residence. In particular,
the Committee calls upon the State party to ensure that every effort is
made to ensure genuine consultation and participation of persons
displaced by Hurricane Katrina in the design and implementation of all
decisions affecting them.
32. While noting the wide range of measures and policies adopted by the State party to
improve access to health insurance and adequate health-care and services, the Committee is
concerned that a large number of persons belonging to racial, ethnic and national minorities
still remain without health insurance and face numerous obstacles to access to adequate
health care and services (art. 5 (e) (iv)).
The Committee recommends that the State party continue its efforts to
address the persistent health disparities affecting persons belonging to
racial, ethnic and national minorities, in particular by eliminating the
obstacles that currently prevent or limit their access to adequate health
care, such as lack of health insurance, unequal distribution of health-care
resources, persistent racial discrimination in the provision of health care
and poor quality of public health-care services. The Committee requests
the State party to collect statistical data on health disparities affecting
persons belonging to racial, ethnic and national minorities, disaggregated
by age, gender, race, ethnic or national origin, and to include it in its next
periodic report.
33. The Committee regrets that despite the efforts of the State party, wide racial
disparities continue to exist in the field of sexual and reproductive health, particularly with
regard to the high maternal and infant mortality rates among women and children belonging
to racial, ethnic and national minorities, especially African Americans, the high incidence of
unintended pregnancies and greater abortion rates affecting African American women, and
the growing disparities in HIV infection rates for minority women (art. 5 (e) (iv)).
CERD/CIMDAICO/7
page 7
27. The Committee invites the State party to update its core document in accordance with the
requirements of the harmonized guidelines on reporting under the international human rights
treaties, in particular those on the common core document, as adopted by the human rights treaty
bodies in their fifth inter-committee meeting, held in June 2006 (see HRIlGEN/2/RevA).
28. In accordance with article 9, paragraph 1, of the Convention and article 65 of its amended
rules of procedure, the Committee requests the State party to provide information, within one
year of the adoption of the present conclusions, on its follow-up to the recommendations
contained in paragraphs 12, 14 and 19 above.
29. The Committee recommends that the State party submit its eighth and ninth periodic
reports, in a single document, due on 25 February 2010, taking into account the specific
guidelines for Committee documents (CERD/C/200711), and that the report be an update
document and address all points raised in the present concluding observations.
CERD/C/uSAlCOl6
page 14
41. The Committee recommends that the State party ratify the amendment to article 8,
paragraph 6, ofthe Convention, adopted on 15.January 1992 at the fourteenth meeting of
States parties to the Convention and endorsed by General Assembly resolution 471111. In
this connection, the Committee cites General Assembly resolution 611148, in which the
Assembly strongly urged States parties to accelerate their domestic ratification procedures
with regard to the amendment and to notify the Secretary-General expeditiously in writing of
their agreement to the amendment.
42. The Committee recommends that the State party's reports be made readily available
to the public at the time of their submission, and that the observations of the Committee with
respect to these reports be similarly publicised in the official and national languages.
43. The Committee recommends that the State party, in connection with the preparation
of the next periodic report, consult widely with organizations of civil society working in the
area of human rights protection, in particular in combating racial discrimination.
44. The Committee invites the State party to update its core document in accordance
with the harmonised guidelines on reporting under the international human rights treaties, in
particular those on the common core document, as adopted by the fifth inter-Committee
meeting of the human rights treaty bodies held in June 2006 (HRIlGEN/2/Rev.4).
45. The State party should, within one year, provide information on the way it has
followed up on the Committee's recommendations contained in paragraphs 14, 19,21,31
and 36, pursuant to paragraph 1 of rule 65 of the rules of procedure.
46. The Committee recommends that the State party submit its seventh, eighth and ninth
periodic reports in a single document, due on 20 November 2011, and that the report be
comprehensive and address all points raised in the present concluding observations.

Friday, July 23, 2010

Racism, irony and censorship: Trademarks of the US media

By Brenda Norrell
Narcosphere
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/brenda-norrell/2010/07/racism-irony-and-censorship-trademarks-us-media
Photo: Church Rock Uranium Spill Commemoration by Garrett Brennan Stewart, Navajo

The Los Angeles Times, while allowing one of its bloggers to ramble and speculate, has insulted the ancient language of the O'odham people, accused them of criminal behavior without any knowledge of the subject and exposed racism and ignorance at the Los Angeles Times.
"Mystery Language on a Border Sign," does not refer to a mystery language, but to the language of the O'odham people who have lived here in the Sonoran Desert since time immemorial. The O'odham live on both sides of what today is known as the US/Mexico border, with O'odham villages on both sides.
While suggesting that the O'odham are illegal border crossers, the author and Los Angeles Times expose their ignorance of the facts and set the stage for more racism and xenophobia at the border.
In a separate article with a twist, CNN has published an article that could be viewed as good comedy on the cozy relationship between the US and Britain, if it were not so tragic. The author, White House Producer Xuan Thai, exposes a dark cavity, using a clever style.
The article is about the "special relationship" -- no make that the "extraordinary special relationship" -- between the US and Britain. (No, the article doesn't refer to the couple's history of oppression, genocide and wars.)
The quotes in the article would be good fodder for Saturday Night Live, except for the tragedy of it.
While exchanging love morsels about their super-fantastic love relationship, US President Barack Obama and British Prime Minister David Cameron didn't even mention the Iroquois Lacrosse Nationals Team.
Days before tying the knot and renewing its vows with the US, Britain prevented the Iroquois Nationals Lacrosse Team from playing in the world championships. Britain refused to honor the Haudenosaunee passports of the team. Britain refused to grant the team visas, which prevented the team from competing in the opening match against England or the games that followed. The US didn't do much better. The Secretary of State waited until the last minute to grant a one-time waiver.
CNN quoted Obama about this over-the-top special relationship.
"We can never say it enough, the United States and the United Kingdom enjoy a truly special relationship," Obama said, adding that it was a "brilliant start as partners who see eye-to-eye on virtually every challenge before us.'"
Of course the duo didn't mention the global warmongering, apartheid and genocide of Indigenous Peoples carried out by the US and Britain.
As for the leaders of the US and Britain, CNN states, "The two men appear serious about this commitment. In fact, Obama has used the term ‘special relationship' with only one other country, Israel."
Closer to home, two events in July signaled the true history of the US and its nuclear genocide, but few newspapers covered these events. In Tularosa, N.M., survivors of the first atomic bomb detonation in 1945 gathered on July 16, 2010, with survivors telling of the cancer that followed the atomic blast. However, online, the only newspaper coverage is at the Alamogordo Daily News.
On that same date 34 years later, on July 16, 1979, the United Nuclear Corporation's uranium tailing spill at Church Rock, N.M., contaminated the land and water, spilling into the Rio Puerco stream, and poisoning generations of Navajos and others downstream in New Mexico and Arizona. The spill left another trail of cancer.
Today, new uranium mining by Uranium Resources, Inc., parent company of Hydro Resources, Inc., and other corporations targets this same community, Church Rock, N.M., and the water supplies of Navajos in Church Rock and Crownpoint.
Native Americans targeted with uranium mining and planned nuclear dumps urge a halt to the Obama administration's funding for new nuclear power plants. Western Shoshone point out that there is no safe place to store nuclear waste. Navajos, Lakotas, Pueblos and other Native Americans expose the long and genocidal history of the nuclear industry in Indian country, and the trail of cancer and death it left behind.
Their story is also a story of the deceit and betrayal of the US government and its symbiotic corporations.
However, few newspapers choose to tell this story.

Photos of the Church Rock Commemoration by Garrett Brennan Stewart, Navajo, are online at Censored News:
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com/

References:
Los Angeles Times: Mystery Language on a Border Sign:
http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/readers/2010/07/mystery-language-on-a-border-sign.html

CNN: Obama, Cameron say it again -- US, UK have 'special relationship'
http://edition.cnn.com/2010/POLITICS/07/20/us.uk.relationship/#fbid=8goa-pI1pi6

Thursday, July 22, 2010

Photos: Church Rock Uranium Spill 31st Anniversary





Church Rock Navajos commemorate 1979 uranium spill

New uranium mining targets Church Rock, where the soil and water remain heavily contaminated

Photos copyright by Garrett Brennan Stewart, Navajo:  gs1027@gmail.com
Censored News
Hello,
My name is Garrett Brennan Stewart, Navajo. My clans are Totsohnii born for T'logi, my maternal grandfather's clan is Naasht'ezhi Tachiinii, and my paternal grandfather's clan is Todichiinii.
Since May, I've been an assistant to Phil Bluehouse, a practitioner of Navajo Peacemaking, which is a method of conflict resolution which utilizes traditional Navajo teachings and philosophy in addressing contemporary concerns. I've documented Phil's work with a community action group from Church Rock, NM (RWPRCA) in their comprehensive planning workshops with USEPA , Navajo EPA, and United Nuclear Corporation/General Electric.
The residents of the community group all reside within very close proximity of the abandoned North East Church Rock Mine, which was previously managed by United Nuclear Corporation. Apparently, the area of the Red Pond Road is highly contaminated, and the concerned parties are trying to come to an agreement as to how the land will be remediated/restored and where the residents will be relocated and for how long.
Enclosed are photos i took at the 31st anniversary march commemorating the 1979 Church Rock Uranium Mill Tailings Spill, including links to video footage which contains bits of information conveyed by Teddy Nez, the president of the Community Group, RWPRCA, and Larry King, resident of Church Rock. There was a 15 minute clip that contained much of Larry's commentary related to the morning of the spill as well as a geiger test of a fenceline on the Abandoned Uranium Mine. Unfortunately, YouTube uploads are limited to 10 minute clips, so I'll edit the piece and upload it again, soon.
This information needs to be shared.
I'd really appreciate it if you could assist us in getting this information out there.
And the YouTube channel of footage I shot on July 16: http://www.youtube.com/user/totsohniinishli
Kind regards,
Garrett Brennan Stewart
.
Also see: "Indian Country" Nuclear Spill Site Approved Again for Uranium Mining
http://www.honorearth.org/blog/%5Buser%5D/quotindian-countryquot-site-largest-radioactive-release-approved-more


FROM AN INFORMATION SHEET PROVIDED BY US EPA:

The Northeast Church Rock Mine Site, an abandoned uranium mine(AUM), is located about 16 miles northeast of Gallup, New Mexico. The site is primarily on tribal trust land adjacent to the Navajo Reservation. The site was mined by United Nuclear Corporation (UNC) between 1968 and 1982. UNC holds responsibility for current contamination at the site. Radium and uranium are the contaminants of primary concern at the site. Radiation and heavy metals in site soils from historic mining practices may pose a significant health risk to human health and to the environment . People may be exposed to these contaminants through ambient air, soil, surface water, sediment, and by eating plants or animals that are impacted by the site. The Navajo Nation Environmental Protection Agency (NNEPA) and the USEPA have independently identified the site as the highest priority AUM among the 520 AUMs identified on the Navajo Nation. This site is the highest priority because it was the largest underground uranium mine in the country and radioactive waste piles continue to spread into the wash and onto the land surrounding several homes located adjacent to the mine.

32st Anniversary of Church Rock Uranium Spill Part I



totsohniinishli | July 18, 2010
The opening prayer of the 2 mile walk down to the commemoration site. I apologize for the shaky camera hand.

Church Rock 31st Anniversary of Mill Tailings Spill Part II



totsohniinishli | July 18, 2010
Teddy Nez, President of the community action group, Red Water Pond Road Community Association, talks about the dirt road that leads to his residence, the status of the Restoration/Remediation effort, as well as the incomplete back-filling of a hillside that rests within very close proximity to his home.

Wednesday, July 21, 2010

Los Angeles Times publishes racist hate speech directed at O'odham

Los Angeles Times,

It is difficult to believe that the Los Angeles Times would allow such ignorance and racism to be published as in 'Mystery Language on a Border Sign.' It insults the O'odham right to travel in their own homelands, insults the O'odham ancient language and exposes the ignorance and racism of both the writer and the Los Angeles Times.
It is difficult to believe the Times would allow the writer to accuse the O'odham of criminal behavior, illegal border crossing, without any knowledge of the subject. The author and Los Angeles Times owe an apology to the O'odham people.
Are you even aware that the O'odham live on both sides of the border in their traditional homelands and have lived here since time immemorial?
Why would you allow a writer to insult a peoples' language without even researching the facts?
This is one of the most racist columns I have ever seen published in major media and constitutes hate speech.
http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/readers/2010/07/mystery-language-on-a-border-sign.html

Brenda Norrell, Tucson

Tucson: World Indigenous Day: August 9, 2010

World Indigenous Day
August 9 · 6:00pm - 9:00pm .

Location YWCA Frances McClelland Leadership Center
525 N. Bonita Ave, Tucson, Arizona
Created By Alianza Indigena Sin Fronteras
PLEASE JOIN US as we come together for WORLD INDIGENOUS DAY on August 9, 2010 to share our ideas and thoughts on the impact of SB 1070 and HB 2281 on our communities.

FEATURED SPEAKER: Simon Ortiz, Acoma Pueblo Poet and Writer
PANEL: Tony Bustamante, Immigration Attorney ■ Leilani Clark, Youth Activist ■ Shannon Rivers, Gila River Indian Community
■ Dr. Roberto Rodriguez, University of Arizona

SPONSORED BY: Alianza Indigena ■ Derechos Humanos ■ Indigenous Environmental Group ■ International Indian Treaty Council ■ Seventh Generation Fund ■ Tonatierra ■ Yoeme Commission on Human Rights ■ YWCA Tucson
MONDAY ■ AUGUST 9, 2010 ■ 6:00 to 9:00

Contact: Jose Matus, director, Alianza Indigena Sin Fronteras, jrmatus@aol.com

Tuesday, July 20, 2010

Native Pride: A Week of Declarations; Celebrated, Reconsidered And Forced

A Week of Declarations; Celebrated, Reconsidered And Forced
By Ohnkwe Ohnwe
Native Pride
So a couple of days after Americans celebrated their Declaration of Independence from tyranny I travelled to Washington D.C. to observe and participate in the U.S. State Department's "Smart Partnership Dialogue" events. The events are to assist the State Department in their review of the U.S. position on the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, that position being a complete rejection of the entire document back in 2007.
The first day, July 7th, was the "Tribal Consultation", described as the "government-to-government tribal consultations between U.S. government agencies and federally recognized tribes". The State Department, which actually hosted the meeting at their facility, rolled out a few of its big guns for the event (don't get excited, Hillary was no where close) and rustled up some White House Indians, some Interior Department underlings and various other government agency staffers. The event was well attended, in fact the room was full to capacity. Sitting at the left hand of the U.S. panel was the Haudenosaunee representatives; I single them out specifically because of the events that would unfold later in the week. A good portion of the discussion focused around religious rights, sacred sites, federal recognition and the general poverty of Indian Country. No one mentioned economic development, trade, passports or any issues related to Native sovereignty as it relates to the international community or the United Nations.
Read column:
http://letstalknativepride.blogspot.com/

Monday, July 19, 2010

Natives of all campaigns: Wahelut Indian School, Aug. 8--9, 2010


...




Double click on pamphlet pages to enlarge.

WHEN: August 8 – 9, 2010

WHERE: Wahelut Indian School

Franks Landing Community, 11110 Conine Ave SE Olympia, WA 98513

Info: 1-360-458-5331


Leticia X is Human II: Tragedy & Waiting for Pres. Obama

Leticia X is Human II: Tragedy & Waiting for Pres. Obama
By Roberto Dr. Cintli Rodriguez
Censored News
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com/
In October of 2009, I wrote a column about a brilliant high school DREAM student whose goal is to attend college in the fall of 2010. I referred to her as Leticia X. When she spoke to my class at the University of Arizona last fall, she had my students in tears, knowing full well that unless the immigration laws change, she will be unable to pursue her dream. Leticia X has a special love of land (agriculture) and her dream as a new high school graduate is to become a teacher in Mexican American Studies. I saw her this past week at the annual Raza/Ethnic Studies conference in Tucson, but this time, it was she who was in tears because her father had been picked up that morning by local Sheriff’s deputies and was subsequently turned over to the border patrol. Read column: http://censored-news.blogspot.com/2010/07/rodriguez-leticia-x-is-human-ii-tragedy.html

LACROSSE PASSPORT STANDOFF IS ABOUT GENOCIDE AND THEFT


LACROSSE PASSPORT STANDOFF IS ABOUT GENOCIDE AND THEFT

Mohawk Nation News
http://www.mohawknationnews.com/

MNN July 18, 2010. Britain’s travel ban against the Iroquois Nationals Lacrosse Team is about genocide, theft and betrayal of their old ally.

The disregard of our sovereignty as the Rotino’shonnui [Iroquois Confederacy] by foreign imperialists is so they can continue to squat on our lands and suck our resources.

We Indigenous have an inherent right to traverse Onowaregeh/Great Turtle Island and the world as sovereign independent peoples.

Papers from foreign corporations cannot interfere with our birthright or define our tie to the natural world.

The Two Row Wampum Agreement governs our relationship with the imperialists. They must confer with us through the U.S. President and the Her Majesty the Queen of England and Canada. International law respects our pre-contact birthright to conduct trade and commerce and travel anywhere using our protocol. The imperialists want to continue to extinguish economic relations between all Onkwehonwe.

The Jay Treaty of 1794 is a third party agreement between Britain and the US that allows imperialists to steal our possessions, backed by military might. Article III applies to immigrants who are “naturalized”. They become American, Canadian or British under the rules and privileges of foreign ‘corporation’.

We are not immigrants. Being forced to carry the passports of illegal foreign corporations is blackmail.

According to universal human rights law, everyone has the right to exist, to defend ourselves, our nationality, land and government.

No nation can denationalize another nation. We are born Rotino’shonni, not citizens. A “city” is a corporation which one willingly joins, where privileges can be taken away by hierarchical governing body.

The UN charter of 1948 and the International Covenant on Cultural and Political Rights binds the imperialists to respect our rights.
The colonists want us to carry the micro chipped cards that contain our DNA, retina scan and finger prints to be put into a satellite GPS tracking system. Europeans rejected this as violating human rights and still use paper passports.

We are being used as guinea pigs to set up imperialist national security. We’ve never carried out terrorist threats or acts anywhere in the world.

Proper protocol must be followed to meet with us so we can polish the Silver Covenant Chain and dust the Two Row Wampum which governs our nation-to-nation relationship.

We cannot surrender our natural connection to our Mother Earth and to fulfill our duties and responsibilities as the caretakers of Great Turtle Island. We continue to stand by her to protect her.

The foreigners are trying to kidnap our people from our canoe and force us to row their boat. Our lacrosse team is being held hostage. We can only leave our canoe by our own free will. We refuse to live under an alien social, economic, political system.

The kasatstenera kowa saoiera give us the confidence in ourselves and our traditional system.

We salute our young lacrosse players who are defending our birthright and protecting the next generations. This imperial act is an attempted continuation of the genocide that was started 500 years ago. Only the corporation names and faces have changed.

Kahentinetha, MNN Mohawk Nation News
Kahentinetha2@yahoo.com For more news, books, to donate and to sign up for MNN newsletters go to http://www.mohawknationnews.com/ Other articles in category “Border”.

Store: Indigenous author – Kahnawake books – Mohawk Warriors Three – Warriors Hand Book – Rebuilding the Iroquois Confederacy.

Category: World – Indian holocaust/genocide – Great Turtle Island – History – New World Order.

Tags: North American Indians – Turtle Island – Indian holocaust/genocide – Canada/US/Mexico – NAU North American Union – History Canada/US – United Nations.

Saturday, July 17, 2010

Black Hills Sioux Nation Treaty Council submission on UN Declaration

Greetings from the International Justice Program of Owe Aku, Bring Back the Way,

As most of you know, the State Department of the United States has begun a review of its position on the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The State Department arranged for "consultations with federally recognized Indian tribes and meetings with interested nongovernmental organizations and other stakeholders."
The Lakota Nation by the Black Hills Sioux Nation Treaty Council four-page letter begins with:
"Greetings from the Black Hills Sioux Nation Treaty Council (“BHTC”). The BHTC represents the Lakota people in our sovereign relationship with the United States of American as preserved in the Fort Laramie Treaties of 1851 and 1868. We come now to address you regarding the review and “consultation” process under which the people of the United States of America, through you, their representatives, are considering the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (“DRIP”). We wish to address two points in particular:
1. “Consultations” with Indian Reorganization Act governments under the supervision of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (“BIA”) established in 1934 on Indian territories in violation of due process and the treaty relationship between our governments, are not authorized or qualified to discuss issues relating to the nation-to-nation relationship, treaties or international rights; and
2. The people of the United States of America, to maintain its claim as a just-minded nation with respect for diverse peoples of the world and the human rights of those peoples, must give unqualified support to the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples."
Please feel free to contact us with any questions or comments. Kent Lebsock, Coordinator, Owe Aku International Justice Program oweakuinternational@me.com
.
Read statement of the Black Hills Sioux Nation Treaty Council to State Department:
http://censored-news.blogspot.com/2010/07/black-hills-sioux-nation-treaty-council.html
Photo Chief Red Cloud

Modoc Nation: Statement UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

Censored News,

I am forwarding this to you for your consideration in publishing it in Censored News. It is the Modoc Nation’s statement in response to the State Department’s request for comments on the United States reexamination of its position on the United Nations Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Please note that the Modoc Tribe (of southern Oregon and northern California), now known as the Modoc Nation is the first and, perhaps, still the only native nation/tribe in the Americas to draft its own statement of indigenous rights based on the UNDRIP, ours being drafted on November 20, 2008.
Blessings,
Two Eagles (Perry Chesnut)
Secretary of State, Modoc Nation
================================================================================
July 15, 2010
The Honorable Hillary Rodham Clinton
Secretary of State, United States of America
In care of: S/SR Global Intergovernmental Affairs
U.S. Department of State
2201 C Street NW., Suite 1317
Washington, DC 20520.
Re: Consultations with federally recognized tribes on the United States Government’s reexamination of its position on the United Nations Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

The Modoc Nation (formerly known as the Modoc Tribe) is a federally recognized tribe listed in the Federal Register under the label “Klamath Tribes.” This misnomer that groups three separate sovereign federally recognized indigenous tribes under a single name, is a serious problem for us that goes to the heart of our sovereignty and our identity and survival as a unique people and culture. The “Klamath Tribes” is not a single tribe; rather it is a name used to refer to the confederation of three separate tribes: the Klamath Tribe, the Modoc Tribe, and the Yahooskin Band of Snake Indians. Our sovereignty and federal recognition stems from the Lakes Treaty of 1864, and although federal recognition was terminated in 1954, it was restored to us in the Klamath Tribe Restoration Act of 1986. No act of Congress, Executive Order, or any constitution that has been used by any of the three tribes has dissolved the sovereignty of any of them or merged them into a single tribe.
Read full text of statements:

Sports Illustrated: Pride of a Nation, Iroquois Lacrosse

Sports Illustrated: Pride of a Nation
Iroquois Lacrosse featured in current issue

The July 19 issue of Sports Illustrated hits newstands this week. Included in the magazine is a feature story by S.L. Price detailing the relationship between the game of lacrosse and Iroquois culture entitled "Pride of a Nation."

Price talked to several current and former Syracuse players and coaches for the story and visited the Onondaga reservation last month. Among those Price interviewed were rising senior midfielder Jeremy Thompson, Orange head coach John Desko, Brett and Freeman Bucktooth, Oren Lyons, Sid Smith, Roy Simmons III and Roy Simmons Jr.

Also see:
Iroquois Nationals Lacrosse website:
http://iroquoisnationals.org/

Friday, July 16, 2010

Ben Powless Photos: Wetuweten Nation Enbridge Protest





Photos by Ben Powless, Mohawk. Members of the Wetsuweten Nation, joined by First Nations activists and allies from across the Canada and US - including IEN, RAN, Ruckus, etc. join forces to protest against the expansion of the Enbridge pipeline through Indigenous territories in northern BC and the further expansion of the Tar Sands megaproject.
Unist’ot’en rally and set up camp to stop Enbridge and KSL pipelines
July 16, 2010
Unist’ot’en organize a large demonstration rally to notify governments and industry about their existing regulatory regime and of their responsibility to protect and restore their devastated environments

Smithers, BC: The ‘Unist’ot’en of the Wet’suwet’en Nation alongside their grassroots allies and supporters assembled in Smithers to organize a rally designed to assert their title and rights on their ancient lands. The rally was organized and led by the ‘Unist’ot’en leadership and had the demonstrators primarily target the Ministry of Forests offices and the Ministry of Environment office. The following is the list of demands that were delivered to the Ministry offices who issue permits and licences for industry and private interests.
Read statement:
http://censored-news.blogspot.com/2010/07/unistoten-rally-and-set-up-camp-to-stop.html
 

Rapid City Journal covers Urban Warrior Society street patrol

Native group brings extra eyes to city streets
By Andrea J. Cook
Rapid City Journal

"Our goal is to be present and be seen. We want people to get used to us," Swan said.
Rapid City Police Chief Steve Allender supports Swan's plan to organize two-person teams of volunteers willing to take the time to walk through the park or attend Native and non-Native community events.
http://rapidcityjournal.com/news/article_11e3bc3e-9148-11df-b939-001cc4c03286.html

Unist’ot’en rally and set up camp to stop Enbridge and KSL pipelines

Unist’ot’en rally and set up camp to stop Enbridge and KSL pipelines
Media release
Photo copyright Ben Powless, Mohawk

July 16, 2010: Unist’ot’en organize a large demonstration rally to notify governments and industry about their existing regulatory regime and of their responsibility to protect and restore their devastated environments

SMITHERS, BC: The ‘Unist’ot’en of the Wet’suwet’en Nation alongside their grassroots allies and supporters assembled in Smithers to organize a rally designed to assert their title and rights on their ancient lands. The rally was organized and led by the ‘Unist’ot’en leadership and had the demonstrators primarily target the Ministry of Forests offices and the Ministry of Environment office. The following is the list of demands that were delivered to the Ministry offices who issue permits and licences for industry and private interests. Read more ...
http://censored-news.blogspot.com/2010/07/unistoten-rally-and-set-up-camp-to-stop.html

Native American Leaders to Prime Minister: Allow Iroquois Nationals Lacrosse Team Entry

July 16, 2010
Contact: Thom Wallace, 202.903.3759
Communications Director, NCAI
National Congress of American Indians Calls on UK to Grant Entry for Game’s World Championships
By NCAI

Washington, D.C. – In a letter to British Prime Minister David Cameron, the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI), the oldest and largest tribal advocacy organization in the United States, has called on the government of the United Kingdom to allow for the entry of the Iroquois Nationals lacrosse team, facilitating participation in the World Lacrosse Championships being held in Manchester, England (Read letter below).

“We strongly urge the United Kingdom to follow the actions of U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and clear the Iroquois Nationals lacrosse team, representing the Six Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy, for international travel on their Haudenosaunee passports,” said NCAI’s President Jefferson Keel in the letter. “As you are aware, the game of lacrosse is indigenous to Native Americans. In the view of Native peoples, denying entry to the game’s historical and cultural emissaries is a troubling scenario.”

The letter addressed to Prime Minister Cameron comes shortly after U.S. Secretary Clinton granted a one-time travel waiver to the Iroquois Nationals team on Thursday. The British government followed by announcing that it would not grant entry to the team.

President Keel emphasized in the letter that the legitimate documentation questions have been addressed, as reflected by the U.S. State Department’s waiver for travel. While the Iroquois Nationals Team has already missed its first game in the World Championships, the team plans on arriving by Saturday to participate.

The letter to Britain’s leader concludes by stating that the National Congress of American Indians encourages the British government to preserve the sanctity and intent of international gamesmanship and tribal sovereignty.

Founded in 1944, the National Congress of American Indians is the oldest, largest and most representative American Indian and Alaska Native organization in the United States. NCAI advocates on behalf of tribal governments, promoting strong tribal-federal government-to-government policies, and promoting a better understanding among the general public regarding American Indian and Alaska Native governments, people and rights.

For More Information Visit: http://www.ncai.org/

N A T I O N A L C O N G R E S S O F A M E R I C A N I N D I A N S
July 16, 2010
The Rt Hon David Cameron MP
Prime Minister
10 Downing Street
London
SW1A 2AA, United Kingdom

Dear Prime Minister David Cameron:

I write on behalf of the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI), the oldest

and largest tribal government advocacy organization representing sovereign tribal nations

in the United States. We strongly urge the United Kingdom to follow the actions of U.S.

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and clear the Iroquois Nationals lacrosse team,

representing the Six Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy, for international travel on their

Haudenosaunee passports. The United Kingdom and its citizenship will benefit greatly

from welcoming these great athletes representing their respective Indian nations.

Our organization is comprised of elected and appointed leaders and citizens from

tribal sovereign nations that have extensive treaty and legal agreements with the United

States Government. Over the last week, we have been working with Obama

Administration officials, the U.S. Department of State, U.S. Department of Homeland

Security, the congressional delegation from the State of New York, and Iroquois Nationals

team officials to resolve legitimate concerns regarding the international travel documents

of Haudenosaunee citizens. As a result, on Thursday, July 15, 2010, Secretary of State

Hillary Rodham Clinton provided a one-time waiver for the travel of this team to the

World Lacrosse Championships.

As you are aware, the game of lacrosse is indigenous to Native Americans. We

greatly respect that the United Kingdom is hosting an international lacrosse tournament.

However, in the view of Native peoples, denying entry to the game’s historical and

cultural emissaries is a troubling scenario. The legitimate documentation questions have

been addressed, as reflected by the U.S. State Department’s waiver for travel. We

encourage your government to preserve the sanctity and intent of international

gamesmanship and tribal sovereignty, and grant entry to the Iroquois Nationals lacrosse

team.

Respectfully,

Jefferson Keel, President

National Congress of American Indians

Lt. Governor, Chickasaw Nation

Iroquois Lacrosse Team: Winning without playing the game


By Brenda Norrell
Narcosphere

It is day five of Britain refusing to honor the Haudenosaunee passports of the Iroquois Nationals Lacrosse Team. Although the team forfeited by default Thursday's game at the world championship in England, the team still hopes to make it to Saturday's game.

However, the UK continues to refuse to recognize the Haudenosaunee passports of the team and grant the players visas.

Meanwhile, the Iroquois Nationals team members have become heroes, symbols of resolute sovereignty.

Barbara Low, Mi'kmaq Nation, said she is so grateful to the Iroquois National Lacrosse team, "for choosing principle over expediency."

"They have already won something that is far more valuable then a trophy. They are true role models, worthy of our utmost respect, and humble admiration. By standing ground, they are drawing the world's attention to the very real struggle of Indigenous Sovereignty," said Low, adding that she stands in solidarity with all other Indigenous Nations who seek to remove the mantle of Colonialism.

The issue of true sovereignty for Indian Nations comes as racism and xenophobia proliferates at the northern and southern borders of the US. The US is attempting to deny the rights of passage and mobility of Indigenous Peoples in their own territories. The US is attempting to annihilate American Indian sovereignty by requiring US passports for Indigenous Peoples, a regulation aimed at dismissing the identity of Indian people.

John Kane, Mohawk, said the Haudenosaunee passport issue exposes more than assimilation, it exposes genocide.

"I am glad we have an entity like the Iroquois Nationals to bring this issue out to the public, but international travel and simple border crossing issues are something our people deal with every day.

"The insistence by the US, Canada and now the UK that we must declare either US or Canadian citizenship to travel, in some instances within our own community, is not just assimilation but genocide."

Kane publishes the Native Pride blog and is an editor and writer for Making A Visible Impact Magazine.

As the Iroquois Lacrosse team waited in New York, neither the U.S. nor Britain acted in good faith. The US State Department's last minute, one-time waiver, was pitiful. Britain's last minute, turn-about refusal to honor the US waiver and the Haudenosaunee sovereign passport is inexcusable.

Iroquois Lacrosse Captatin Gewas Schinder said Thursday, "The UK is not letting us into the country. They told us last week that once the U.S. has cleared us they'll allow us in. Now they're going back on their word."

All the Iroquois Nationals Lacrosse Team players wanted to do was to play lacrosse, the game invented by the Iroquois, and honor their identity.

The Iroquois Nationals Lacrosse Team refused to play the game of the US and Britain.

The words "American Indian sovereignty" are often used in the media, but seldom are these words manifest with such power and conviction as by these young Haudenosaunee men.

Ady, the Iroquois Nationals Lacrosse Team members are the winners.

Thursday, July 15, 2010

Day 5: UK continues to deny visas to Iroquois Nationals Lacrosse



Iroquois Lacrosse team holds out hope of playing in Saturday's game

UK continues to deny visas to Iroquois Nationals
"The UK is not letting us into the country. They told us last week that once the U.S. has cleared us they'll allow us in... now they're going back on their word." - Gewas Schinder, Iroquois Nationals Lacrosse Captain
Contact the Prime Minister David Cameron - https://email.number10.gov.uk/

Iroquois lacrosse team defaults on 1st tourney game, still trying to get OK to enter England
http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/world/breakingnews/iroquois-lacrosse-team-defaults-on-1st-tourney-game-still-trying-to-get-ok-to-enter-england-98533134.html

The Winners: Iroquois Nationals Lacrosse Team

.
'The insistence by the US, Canada and now the UK that we must declare either US or Canadian citizenship to travel, in some instances within our own community, is not just assimilation but genocide.' --John Kane, Mohawk

By Brenda Norrell
Censored News

The sovereignty of the Haudenosaunee will not disappear with the refusal of Britain to recognize the Iroquois Lacrosse Nationals Lacrosse Team passports.
Neither the U.S. nor Britain acted in good faith. The US State Department's last minute, one-time waiver, is no solution.
Britain's last minute, turn-about refusal to honor the US waiver and the Haudenosaunee sovereign passport is inexcusable.
All the Iroquois Nationals Lacrosse Team players wanted to do was to play lacrosse, the game invented by the Iroquois, and honor their identity.
The words "American Indian sovereignty" are often used in the media, but seldom is it manifest with such power and conviction as by these young Haudenosaunee men.
The Iroquois Nationals Lacrosse Team members are truly the winners.
Barbara Low, Mi'kmaq Nation, said she is "so grateful to the Iroquois National Lacrosse team, for choosing principle over expediency."
"They have already won something that is far more valuable then a trophy. They are true role models, worthy of our utmost respect, and humble admiration. By standing ground, they are drawing the world's attention to the very real struggle of Indigenous Sovereignty," Low said, adding that she stands in solidarity with all other Indigenous Nations who seek to remove the mantle of Colonialism.
John Kane, Mohawk, said this issue exposes more than assimilation, it exposes genocide.
"I am glad we have an entity like the Iroquois Nationals to bring this issue out to the public, but international travel and simple border crossing issues are something our people deal with every day. The insistence by the US, Canada and now the UK that we must declare either US or Canadian citizenship to travel, in some instances within our own community, is not just assimilation but genocide."
Kane publishes the Native Pride blog and is an editor and writer for Making A Visible Impact Magazine.

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