Monday, March 30, 2015

Border Patrol Victims Network!

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Please join us in supporting the border patrol victims network!

Arizona border communities stand with the families of Jose Gutierrez, Carlos La Madrid and Jose Antonio Elena Rodriguez


Tucson, AZ: Border residents from Tucson, Arizona are rallying Monday to support the family of Jose Gutierrez who continues to denounce the brutal beating he endured 4 years ago at the hands of 11  Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agents at the San Luis Port of Entry as he attempted to cross back into the U.S. to reunite with his family. The case of Jose Gutierrez still has not been resolved and no agent has been held accountable.

Press Conference:
2:00 pm Monday, March 30, 2015
El Tiradito Wishing Shrine
420 S. Main Ave, Tucson, AZ. 85701

Rally:
5:00 pm
4th Ave. & 6th St. Intersection
Tucson, AZ. 85701

The actions on Monday will also call attention to the case of 19-year-old Carlos La Madrid who was shot and killed 9 days before Jose Gutierrez' beating and also the case of 16-year-old Jose Antonio Elena Rodriguez who was shot and killed by Border Patrol agents as he was walking down the street in Nogales, Mexico. April 10, marks 2 ½ years since his killing.

Since the incidents took place, the families of the victims of border brutality have begun working together to demand justice for their cases and to call for accountability and oversight over the nation's largest law-enforcement agency, Customs and Border Protection. As a result of the relentless efforts of the families, CBP has recently begun a pilot program to equip agents with body-worn cameras, which marks a step forward in bringing about meaningful oversight and accountability.

Visuals: In Monday's events, sections of the Border Quilt will be on display. The Border Quilt is a collection of nearly 200 handmade cloth panels made by border residents expressing the toll that border militarization has taken in terms of rights violations and abuse. To call attention to the cases of border families, the Border Quilt will travel throughout the southern border over the next 12 weeks culminating with actions commemorating the deaths of Anastasio Hernandez Rojas in San Diego and Sergio Adrian Hernandez-Huereca, two high-profile cases of border brutality.

Human rights groups including the Border Action Network, Border Patrol Victims Network and the Southern Border Communities Coalition will be joining Shena Gutierrez, wife of Jose Gutierrez for a press conference and an evening rally.

Shena Gutierrez, wife of Jose, released this statement on behalf of their family:

Four years ago, our lives completely changed when Jose was handcuffed and taken from us to be deported to Mexico, a country he had not seen in over 3 decades. We did not think things could get any worse until March 30, 2011, when Jose was brutally beaten into a coma by Border Patrol agents. For 4 years we have been fighting for justice and we will continue to raise awareness about the culture of violence within Customs and Border Protection.


The Southern Border Communities Coalition (SBCC) brings together more than 60 organizations from San Diego, California, to Brownsville, Texas, to ensure that border enforcement policies and practices are accountable and fair, respect human dignity and human rights, and prevent the loss of life in the region.


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Economic Blackmail: The New McCarthyism in Indian Country News

John Kane, Mohawk
Does truth-telling in the media now mean that you have to work for free in America?

By Brenda Norrell
Censored News

It is sad that John Kane, Mohawk, can not find any sponsors to keep his radio show, 'Let's Talk Native,' going.

Is this what happens now to the truth-tellers in the media? Does telling the truth in the media now mean that you have to work for free in America?

During the Boarding School Tribunal in Green Bay, Wisconsin, it was John Kane who called in to provide radio coverage. The only media there was Govinda of Earthcycles and Censored News. None of us are paid for our work. In fact, as John's message below shows, we can't even attract enough donations to cover our expenses to keep going.

The point is that the media has collapsed and a form of economic blackmail is present. It is just as serious as the blacklisting of McCarthyism. It is just carried out in a different manner.

At the same time, this black hole of journalism has created a door for heroes to walk through. It offers us the chance to be present and cover the stories that no one else will, a chance to broadcast the ideas that could transform this planet.

Surely future generations will look back for kernels of truth, and will celebrate those that survive.

With the high costs of travel, equipment, radio airtime and more, the truth-tellers, even when they offer their labors of love for free, are finding there is no way to keep going.

The problem with grants and advertising is that neither are free. Each comes with a price.

As Hopi elder Dan Evehema told me years ago, "Don't ever take grants, or they will own you."

As for big money advertisers, look at the effects that casino, mining and CIA ads have had on Indian country news. The majority of what you have today is either plagiarism by stay-at-home reporters, or fluff by writers surfing and re-writing the web. 

Those stay-at-home reporters have also found cash bounty in the good-hearted activists who pay their own way to share the news. Those stay-at-home plagiarizers get a paycheck from what they seize from the web.

What you have today in the news is the void remaining from the issues that are censored.

John Kane posted this message on Sunday:

Tonight is to be my final "Let's Talk Native…" program. WWKB would like me to stay on but the cost of paid programming has always been a challenge and the lack sustainable funding has made the show in its existing form and location unsustainable as well. I will make a plea tonight to continue to support my costs associated with travel to NYC for my show there and I will make what will likely be my final pitch to cover the costs for the billing cycle I am completing with my show here in Buffalo. I have been asked if I would be willing to continue through the month of April and I will say that if there is support for me to continue through next month, with firm commitments to cover the airtime on a weekly basis I would consider doing so.
But join us tonight with your calls and thoughts as we look back on this show and look for future opportunities to keep the conversations going.
Let's Talk!
Contact John at jmkane1220@aol.com


Brenda Norrell has been a news reporter in Indian country for 33 years, beginning at Navajo Times during the 18 years that she lived on the Navajo Nation. She served as a freelance reporter for AP and USA Today covering the Navajo Nation and federal courts. After being censored and terminated as a staff writer for Indian Country Today, she created Censored News, now in its 9th year with 3.8 million pageviews.

brendanorrell@gmail.com

Hillary, about those iris scans

Hillary, about those iris scans 

By Brenda Norrell
Censored News

Hillary Clinton has deleted all her e-mails, leaving me with two questions. First, with all the NSA spying going on, aren't those e-mails stored in some cryptic tomb somewhere?

Also, I am wondering about those iris scans that Hillary, while Secretary of State, asked her Ambassadors to collect. The iris scans, and personal data, were ordered by Hillary and then exposed in the big Wikileaks State Department dump. In case you missed it, here goes:

The State Department asked US Ambassadors to engage in espionage.

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton ordered US Ambassadors to get DNA, fingerprints, frequent flyer numbers and iris scans on world leaders.

Iris scans?

As originally reported in Censored News after the big Wikileaks dump, here it is:

Clinton wrote, "Data should include email addresses, telephone and fax numbers, fingerprints, facial images, DNA, and iris scans."
The April 16, 2009, cable was for "reporting and collection needs: African Great Lakes," for the Democratic Republic of Congo, Burundi and Rwanda. Similar cables were written for other parts of the world.
Along with ethnicity (tribe and clan) and religious information, Clinton asked for "compendia of contact information, such as telephone directories (in compact disc or electronic format if available) and e-mail listings; internet and intranet 'handles,' internet e-mail addresses, web site identification-URLs; credit card account numbers; frequent flyer account numbers; work schedules."
Clinton's cable to Paraguay inquired about "rifts" and "internal factions" of politicians. The "reporting and collection" needs again included iris scans and DNA.
Clinton asked US diplomats in Paraguay for: "Biographic and financial information on all leading contenders, and especially on Minister of Education Blanca Ovelar, former Vice President Castiglioni, Lino Oviedo, and Fernando Lugo; and biometric data, to include fingerprints, facial images, iris scans, and DNA, on these individuals."
Africa cable:
Paraguay cable:

We realize that many of you don't like to read long stories, so we'll keep this one short.

OK, so maybe I have a third question: Hillary did you re-read your 60,000 e-mails to determine which ones were work related, and which ones were personal? So, how long did that take?

Sunday, March 29, 2015

POSICIONAMIENTO DEL CNI SOBRE LA OLA REPRESIVA EN CONTRA DE LOS PUEBLOS


Photo Schools for Chiapas
Mexican military stalks Indigenous 


POSICIONAMIENTO DEL CNI SOBRE LA OLA REPRESIVA  EN CONTRA DE LOS PUEBLOS

Yaqui spokesmen for the defense of Yaqui water rights
in Sonora remain imprisoned.
(The National Indigenous Congress rises up against the narco-trafficking which seeks to seize control of the country of Mexico, and the Mexican government stalking the Zapatistas. Further, the National Indigenous Congress names those who are imprisoned for their defense of the people, land and water, including our two Yaqui brothers, spokesmen for the water rights barricade in Sonora. Check back for full English translation.)
A los pueblos originarios de México y el Mundo
A la Sexta Nacional e Internacional
Al Ejército Zapatista de Liberación Nacional

A la memoria de Don Félix Serdán Nájera,
Hermano principal.

Reunidos en la comunidad de Amatlán de Quetzalzoatl, municipio de Tepoztlán, Morelos, los pueblos naciones y tribus que conformamos el Congreso Nacional Indígena analizamos la ola represiva de los capitalistas narco gobernantes que pretenden apoderarse de nuestra patria.

El embate en nuestra contra no tiene que ver con los colores de los partidos que arriba gobiernan, ni en la forma y modo como sean elegidos o impuestos,  pues todos y cada uno de ellos tienen como fin administrar el despojo que de más arriba imponen, no tiene que ver con la mentira electorera a la que llaman democracia y que no es más que un reflejo de la descomposición que entraña el sangriento capitalismo neoliberal y que engendra eso que llaman “reformas estructurales”, que son, por la supervivencia de los pueblos dolidos en el campo y la ciudad; impuestas a costa del dolor, de la libertad y la vida de nuestra gente.

La represión que los malos gobiernos han ejercido en contra de nuestros pueblos es en respuesta a nuestra decisión de no parar nuestra resistencia para no dejar de existir por obra de la cruenta guerra de exterminio. No tiene que ver solo con una persecución política, sino que es una reacción de los que arriba diseñan el despojo para consolidar sus intereses asentados sobre la explotación, el despojo, la represión y el desprecio que pueden tomar diferentes rostros y reflejos:

Hoy nos siguen haciendo falta 46 compañeros de la escuela Normal Rural Isidro Burgos de Ayotzinapa, asesinados y desaparecidos por los tres órdenes de los malos gobiernos, por todos los partidos políticos que hacen del terror un negocio y una forma de gobernar. Mientras el Estado criminal apuesta al olvido los pueblos apostamos a reconstruir, a no olvidar y a no perdonar, pues lo que está en juego es el futuro, que al igual que la historia, nos pertenecen.
La comunidad Tzeltal de San Sebastián Bachajón, en el municipio de Chilón Chiapas, ha enfrentado las fuerzas represivas del mal gobierno que pretenden despojarla de las cascadas de Agua Azul para ser entregadas los intereses capitalistas. Apenas el 21 de marzo del presente año más de 600 integrantes de las fuerzas de seguridad gubernamentales incendiaron la sede regional San Sebastián de nuestros hermanos y los medios libres que se han solidarizado con su lucha han sido agredidos por las fuerzas de seguridad pública mientras la policía estatal y el ejército mexicano han escalado la ocupación de su territorio en respaldo de los grupos paramilitares.
La comunidad Nahua de Santa María Ostula, en la costa de Michoacán ha enfrentado desde el año 2009, el asecho de supuestos grupos  de la delincuencia organizada, coludidos con todos niveles del  mal gobierno ha costado la desaparición de 5 comuneros y el asesinato de 32 mas. El pasado 16 de marzo la Marina Armada intentó desalojar y desarmar  a la policía comunitaria que mantiene un reten sobre la carretera costera a la altura del poblado de Xayakalan, territorio recuperado en el año de 2009, acción a la que la comunidad respondió cerrando la carretera costera, pues permitir el desarme de los comunitarios significa quedar en manos de los narco paramilitares y de esa manera consolidar el despojo contra la comunidad para los megaproyectos de muerte como es el narcotráfico, el turismo trasnacional y la explotación minera. Todo protegido y auspiciado por los malos gobiernos.
Siguen presos los compañeros Mario Luna y Fernando Jiménez, voceros de la tribu Yaqui, en Sonora, sobre la base de haberles fabricado delitos graves basados en el no reconocimiento de las formas ancestrales de organización de los pueblos y la jurisdicción del gobierno tradicional Yaqui. A la fecha persiste la orden de aprehensión contra el compañero Tomás Rojo, pretendiendo usar la división y la traición como mecanismo de guerra. Asimismo las amenazas de muerte e intentos de homicidio en contra de Lauro Baumea a quien quemaron su vehículo afuera de su domicilio, además de amenazar con atentar contra la vida de su familia. Todo esto para concretar el robo del agua del río Yaqui.
Siguen presos los compañeros loxichas en el estado de Oaxaca quienes llevan 18 años secuestrados por los malos gobiernos como parte de su política contrainsurgente y terrorista en medio de grandes proyectos mineros trasnacionales, al igual que los hermanos Nahuas de San Pedro Tlanixco en el Estado de México, quienes llevan 12 años presos por defender el agua en contra de que les fuera robada para campos agroindustriales.
El despojo a comunidades y ejidos en los estados de Morelos, Puebla y Tlaxcala a través del llamado Proyecto Integral Morelos está siendo acompañada de una persecución contra los pueblos del volcán Pocatepetl que se oponen a entregar su territorio, su seguridad y su agua a trasnacionales para la imposición de carreteras, acueductos, gaseoductos y termoeléctricas custodiadas por todos los órdenes represivos del mal gobierno. Actualmente existen numerosas órdenes de aprehensión en contra de quienes han alzado la voz contra esta destrucción acompañada de policías y militares que acompañan la maquinaria, misma que en los últimos días se ha expresado en los trabajos de entubamiento del río Cuautla para favorecer a la Termoeléctrica de Huexca en detrimento de los ejidos del municipio de Ayala.
La comunidad de San Francisco Xochicuautla, en el Estado de México, mantiene una lucha en contra del despojo de su territorio por la construcción de una autopista privada, e incluso los comuneros han perdido la libertad para platicar en sus asambleas comunales que han sido tomadas por decenas de granaderos que buscan consolidar el despojo agrario.
Mientras resistimos al despojo en nuestras comunidades, miles de compañeros deben migrar para buscar alternativas para su sustento, muchos de ellos llegan a campos de concentración donde son explotados y esclavizados, como es el caso de San Quintín, en Baja California Sur, donde los malos gobiernos reprimen las movilizaciones que buscan mejores condiciones de trabajo para miles de jornaleros agrícolas. La mayoría de ellos de origen indígena.
Estamos convencidos que para parar esta guerra no bastan las consignas; tampoco será volteando a ver los calendarios, geografías y formas de los de arriba, sino que necesitamos hacer un nuevo país, un nuevo mundo.

Lo saben también los poderosos que han agudizado el hostigamiento militar en los caracoles zapatistas de La Realidad y Oventik y agresiones paramilitares por grupos promovidos, financiados y entrenados por los malos gobiernos, como Pojcol, CIOAC Histórica y ORCAO, que  ejercen una violencia sistemática en contra las comunidades bases de apoyo zapatistas, quienes con su organización autónoma hacen brillar el horizonte que es una esperanza civilizatoria y que tiene sus raíces antiguas en nuestras culturas como pueblos originarios.

Por todo lo anterior declaramos:

Que no pararemos en la lucha por reconstruir lo y reconstituirnos como pueblos originarios, pues nuestra lucha es por la vida y seguir existiendo.
Que intensificaremos la lucha por la libertad de los presos políticos, la presentación de los desaparecidos y la justicia para los asesinados.
Que la ola represiva es en respuesta a esa resistencia contra el despojo que no conoce fin pues su origen está en el origen mismo del mundo y por lo tanto no es negociable.
Que seguiremos tejiendo desde abajo y a la izquierda un nuevo mundo posible y necesario, pues solo así podrá brillar la paz para nuestros pueblos y el fin de la represión.
Saludamos la realización del homenaje a los compañeros Luis Villoro Toranzo y al maestro zapatista Galeano que tendrán lugar en el caracol de Oventik, Chiapas el 2 de mayo de 2015.


Amatlán de Quetzalcoatl, Tepoztlán, Morelos

A 22 de marzo de 2015

Por la Reconstitución Integral de Nuestros Pueblos

Nunca Más un México Sin Nosotros

Congreso Nacional Indígena.

Saturday, March 28, 2015

Lakota Vern Traversie's statement after jury denies his claims

Statement of Vern Traversie in wake of jury denying his claims‏

A jury in the U.S. District Court of South Dakota has ruled against Vern Traversie, the 71-year-old Cheyenne River Sioux man, who brought suit over civil rights violations that he endured while a patient in the Rapid City Regional Hospital in 2011.
Vern Traversie’s statement: “I thank the jurors and the Court for giving me my day in court. For me this is a victory in itself.  I shared my story about what happened to me while I was a patient at the Rapid City Regional Hospital for one reason: to make sure that no other American Indian is treated in an uncaring way.

Read Vern Traversie's statement at Last Real Indians: http://lastrealindians.com/statement-of-vern-traversie-in-wake-of-jury-denying-his-claims%E2%80%8F/

(Below) Censored News video when it happened:
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Blind, 68-year-old Lakota elder Vern Traversie has KKK carved into his torso while recovering from open heart surgery at Rapid City Regional Hospital on a referral from the Indian Health Service.
After 7 months of waiting for justice, Cheyenne River Sioux Nation tribal member Vern Traversie goes public with an appeal for justice.

Activists 'Shut Down' Nestlé Water Bottling Plant in Sacramento

Photo of protest in front of the Nestlé Waters bottling plant in Sacramento on March 20 by Dan Bacher.

Activists 'Shut Down' Nestlé Water Bottling Plant in Sacramento 

by Dan Bacher
Censored News
Environmental and human rights activists, holding plastic “torches” and “pitchforks,” formed human barricades at both entrances to the Nestlé Waters bottling plant in Sacramento at 5:00 a.m. on Friday March 20, effectively shutting down the company's operations for the day. 

Members of the “Crunch Nestlé Alliance" shouted out a number of chants, including “”We got to fight for our right to water,” “Nestlé, Stop It, Water Not For Profit," and “Agua Para Quien? Para Nuestra Gente!” 

The protesters stayed until about 1 pm, but there were no arrests. 

Representatives of the alliance said the company is draining up to 80 million gallons of water a year from Sacramento aquifers during a record drought. They claim Sacramento City Hall has made it possible through a "corporate welfare giveaway." 

“This corporate welfare giveaway is an outrage and warrants a major investigation,” Coalition spokesperson Andy Conn said. “For more than five months we have requested data on Nestlé water use. City Hall has not complied with our request, or given any indication that it will. Sacramentans deserve to know how their money is being spent and what they’re getting for it. In this case, they’re getting ripped off.” 

Lola Ellis of 99 Rise Sacramento, who spoke on the bullhorn at the protest, said, “Nestlé’s bottling of water in Sacramento is unsustainable in the current state of drought. We really don’t’ know how much water they are taking from the aquifer and that is a scary thing.” 

“The water needs to be used for the local community. If there is not enough water for the local community, the Nestlé corporation should not be making a profit,” she emphasized. 

The coalition protested what they call Nestlé's “virtually unlimited use of water” while Sacramentans (like other Californians) who use a mere 7 to 10 percent of total water used in the State of California, have had severe restrictions and limitations forced upon them. 

The coalition is calling on Nestlé to pay rates commensurate with its enormous profit, or voluntarily close down. 

“Nestlé pays only 65 cents for each 470 gallons it pumps out of the ground – the same rate as an average residential water user. But the company can turn the area's water around, and sell it back to Sacramento at mammoth profit,” according to a news release from the activists. 

They said Sacramento officials have refused attempts to obtain details of Nestlé's water use. Coalition members have addressed the Sacramento City Council and requested that Nestle’ either pay a commercial rate under a two tier level, or pay a tax on its profit. 

A call to the Sacramento City Department Utilities about the details of Nestle’s water use hadn’t been returned as of press time. 

But according to Fox 40 News, “In 2014 Nestlé says it used 50 million gallons from the Sacramento Municipal Water Supply, which they say is a fraction of one percent of total water demand within the city of Sacramento.” 

“Nestle can claim any amount of water they want, but we haven’t seen any documentation of the amount of water they’re using,” said Bob Saunders, also with the Crunch Nestlé Alliance. "We do know they’re allowed to take up to 80 million gallons per year.” 

Mauro Oliveira, known as "Red Sun," showed up at the protest with his children, including Rise, Aren and Mahai'a, and connected the battle of local activists against Nestlé with the struggle of Indian Tribes, family farmers, grassroots environmental activists and fishermen to stop fracking, the Shasta Dam raise, and Governor Jerry Brown’s Bay Delta Conservation Plan (BDCP) to build the twin tunnels, the most environmentally destructive public works project in California history. 

“This whole idea of bottling water goes against Indigenous Peoples' concept of water is sacred," said Oliveira. "The 20,000-year-old water in aquifers belongs to the last generation on earth. We don’t have the right to tap into this water.” 

“The Governor said we should conserve, but millions of gallons of fracking waste are being reinjected into the aquifer in California. The Governor talks out of both sides of his mouth. Polluting our water supplies is a violation of human rights," said Oliveira. 

Raiding pristine water from a National Forest stream 

The bottling plant in Sacramento is not the only one in California. A recent investigation in the Desert Sun found that Nestlé Waters North America has been pumping water from pristine streams of the San Bernardino National Forest with little to no oversight by the U.S. Forestry Service. (http://www.desertsun.com/story/news/2015/03/05/bottling-water-california-drought/24389417/

“Nestle Waters North America holds a longstanding right to use this water from the national forest near San Bernardino,” according to the Sun. “But the U.S. Forest Service hasn't been keeping an eye on whether the taking of water is harming Strawberry Creek and the wildlife that depends on it. In fact, Nestle's permit to transport water across the national forest expired in 1988. It hasn't been reviewed since, and the Forest Service hasn't examined the ecological effects of drawing tens of millions of gallons each year from the springs.” 

On its website, Nestlé claims that it is committed to “environmental stewardship.” (http://www.nestle-watersna.com/en/about-nestle-waters

“36 years of experience promoting healthy hydration, Nestlé Waters North America has 15 leading U.S. and Canadian bottled water brands,” according to the company. “The company’s commitment to environmental stewardship, especially in the areas of water use, packaging and energy, as well as its dedication to partnering in the communities where it operates, have led Nestlé Waters to achieve the number one bottled drinking water position in the U.S.” 

Activists disagree strongly with the company’s claims of commitment to "environmental stewardship." In October, the “Crunch Nestle” coalition released a "White Paper" highlighting predatory water profiteering actions taken by Nestle’ Water Bottling Company in various cities, counties, states and countries. 

Most of those great “deals” yielded mega profits for Nestle’ at the expense of the public. Additionally, the environmental impact on many of those areas yielded “disastrous results,” the paper stated. 

Nestlé is currently the leading supplier of the world’s bottled water, including such brands as Perrier and San Pellegrino, and has been criticized by activists for human rights violations throughout the world. 

Nestlé Waters says it has 7,500 employees and 29 bottled water facilities across the U.S. and Canada, and annual revenues were $4.0 billion in 2012, up 6.8% from 2011. 

For example, Food and Water Watch and other organizations blasted Nestlé’s "Human Rights Impact Assessment" in December 2013 as a "public relations stunt." 
(http://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/pressreleases/organizations-denounce-nestles-new-human-rights-impact-assessment-as-a-public-relations-stunt-us-version/

“The failure to examine Nestlé’s track record on the human right to water is not surprising given recent statements by its chair Peter Brabeck-Letmath challenging the human right to water,” said Wenonah Hauter, Executive Director of Food & Water Watch. She noted that the company famously declared at the 2000 World Water Forum in the Netherlands that water should be defined as a need—not as a human right. 

Watch Nestlé's CEO declare water “food that should be privatized, and not a human right”: http://http://www.globalresearch.ca/nestle-continues-stealing-worlds-water-during-drought/5438880 

More recently Brabeck-Letmathe, after facing international criticism for his remarks, reversed course and now said he thinks that "water is a human right and that everyone, everywhere in the world, has the right to clean, safe water for drinking and sanitation." (http://www.nestle.com/aboutus/ask-nestle/answers/nestle-chairman-peter-brabeck-letmathe-believes-water-is-a-human-right?gclid=CPX_jpydycQCFQaTfgodFjAA0Q

But activists continue to cite the company's bad human rights record, noting that Nestlé workers who have protested unjust labor conditions at the corporation’s facilities in Colombia have been assassinated by paramilitary death squads. 

"In November 2013, Colombian trade unionist Oscar Lopez Trivino became the fifteenth Nestlé worker to be assassinated by a paramilitary organization while many of his fellow workers were in the midst of a hunger strike protesting the corporation’s refusal to hear their grievances," according to the groups. 

Taking the water from aquifers throughout the world and the deaths of workers protesting Nestlé policies are not the only violation of human rights that activists charge the corporation with. Groups including the International Baby Food Action Network (IBFAN) and Save the Children claim that the promotion of Nestle infant formula over breastfeeding has led to health problems and deaths among infants in less economically developed countries. 

“They’re a despicable company with death built into their business plan,” summed up Conn. 

For more information about the Crunch Nestlé Alliance, contact Andy Conn (530) 906-8077 camphgr55 (at) gmail.com or Bob Saunders (916) 370-8251 

The Drought and The Tunnels 

The Sacramento protest took place just days after Jay Famiglietti, the senior water scientist at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory/Caltech and a professor of Earth system science at UC Irvine, revealed in an op-ed in the LA Times on March 12 that California has only one year of water supply left in its reservoirs. (http://touch.latimes.com/#section/-1/article/p2p-83043355/

The protest also made the news as Governor Jerry Brown continues to fast-track his Bay Delta Conservation Plan (BDCP) to build the peripheral tunnels to ship Sacramento River water to corporate agribusiness, Southern California water agencies, and oil companies conducting fracking operations. 

The $67 billion plan won't create one single drop of new water, but it will take vast tracts of Delta farm land out of production under the guise of "habitat restoration" in order to irrigate drainage-impaired soil owned by corporate mega-growers on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley. 

The tunnel plan will also hasten the extinction of Sacramento River Chinook salmon, Central Valley steelhead, Delta and longfin smelt, green sturgeon and other fish species, as well as imperil the salmon and steelhead populations on the Klamath and Trinity rivers. The peripheral tunnels will be good for agribusiness, water privateers, oil companies and the 1 percent, but will be bad for the fish, wildlife, people and environment of California and the public trust.
§In front of the plant
by Dan Bacher Friday Mar 27th, 2015 4:01 PM

Protesters form a "barricade" in front of the bottling plant in Sacramento. Photo by Dan Bacher.
§Aren Oliveia
by Dan Bacher Friday Mar 27th, 2015 4:01 PM

Aren Oliveira holds up a "torch" and "pitchfork." Photo by Dan Bacher.
§Crunch Nestlé
by Dan Bacher Friday Mar 27th, 2015 4:01 PM

Protesters at the Nestlé bottling plant in Sacramento just after sunrise. Photo by Dan Bacher.
§Faygo speaking
by Dan Bacher Friday Mar 27th, 2015 4:01 PM

Faygo, local activist, speaking at the protest. Photo by Dan Bacher.
§Delphine Brody
by Dan Bacher Friday Mar 27th, 2015 4:01 PM

Delphine Brody, local activist, on the bullhorn. Photo by Dan Bacher.
§Water is not a commodity
by Dan Bacher Friday Mar 27th, 2015 4:01 PM

Protesters stayed in front of the plant from 5 a.m. to 1 p.m. Photo by Dan Bacher.

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