August 2020

Indigenous Peoples and Human Rights

Tuesday, September 22, 2020

'Gather' film showcases Native Americans reclaiming food sovereignty



 

GATHER: The Fight to Revitalize Native Food Ways


By Bioneers
Censored News

Gather, a recently released documentary and New York Times critic’s pick, is an intimate portrait of the growing movement amongst Native Americans to reclaim their spiritual, political and cultural identities through food sovereignty, while battling the trauma of centuries of genocide.

Gather follows Nephi Craig, a chef from the White Mountain Apache Nation (Arizona), opening an indigenous café as a nutritional recovery clinic; Elsie Dubray, a young scientist from the Cheyenne River Sioux Nation (South Dakota), conducting landmark studies on bison; and the Ancestral Guard, a group of environmental activists from the Yurok Nation (Northern California), trying to save the Klamath river.

Learn more about the film.


Indigenous Rights and Women's Leadership -- WECAN Webinar

 

Indigenous Rights and Women's Leadership
are Central to Divestment Strategies
Tuesday, September 22, 2020
1:00pm EST USA Time // 5:00pm UTC
In light of the climate crisis, environmental racism, colonial policies, gender inequality, and the Covid-19 pandemic, it has never been more clear the importance of Indigenous rights and self-determination and women’s leadership as central strategies for justice and protection of Mother Earth. From the frontlines of extraction to the boardrooms of financial institutions to the halls of governments, Indigenous women are leading resistance efforts against the fossil fuel industry. Indigenous women and their allies are building critical strategies for divestment from fossil fuels, calling for justice and accountability from the financial sector, and advocating for a Just Transition that places people and planet first.

Indigenous women and their allies are demanding that financial institutions adhere to the Paris Climate Agreement, protect the climate, respect the rights of nature, and the rights and lives of Indigenous communities experiencing the impacts of fossil fuel development. While much more is still needed, divestment advocacy, direct actions, and campaigning are having a critical impact on the fossil fuel industry regarding moving funds out from the dirty energy sector and generating policy changes to uphold Indigenous and human rights as we face the climate crisis.
Speakers include: Casey Camp-Horinek, Ponca Nation, long-time Native rights activist, Environmental Ambassador and WECAN Board Member; Charlene Aleck, Tsleil-Waututh Nation, former councillor with the Tsleil-Waututh Nation and Trans Mountain pipeline expansion opponent; Monique Verdin, Houma Nation, Director of The Land Memory Bank & Seed Exchange, Organizer with Another Gulf is Possible; Michelle Cook, Diné, Founder of Divest Invest Protect, Founder and Co-Director of the Indigenous Women’s Divestment Delegations; with facilitation and comments by Osprey Orielle Lake, Founder of the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN), Co-Director of the Indigenous Women’s Divestment Delegations.

Full event description and speaker bios can be found at the Facebook event and on our website!