Tuesday, September 15, 2015

Dineh Join Climate Coalition in DC: Obama Halt Fossil Fuel Leasing




.


helped deliver the message to President Obama: It's time to keep our fossil fuels in the ground!
In the Keep it in the Ground campaign, Wild Earth Guardians said, "The time is now to boldly cut carbon pollution and move our nation away from fossil fuels. We can't even begin to make this happen if the President is going to keep stop selling more of our publicly owned coal, oil, and gas. It's time to Keep it in the Ground!"

By Brenda Norrell
Censored News

WASHINGTON -- Louise Benally of Big Mountain joined Native American delegations and coalitions here today to tell President Obama to stop leasing lands and oceans for fossils fuels. Benally's message was "Keep it in the Ground."

Before President Obama's Secret Service chased Native Americans and their allies away from the White House park, Benally brought the dirty truth of dirty coal in her homeland.

“Coal companies like Peabody Energy have been mining federal and tribal coal in and near native communities like mine for decades. The tribal governments allow energy companies to impound peoples’ livestock, which is the only source of income and food for communities impacted by forced removal—a legacy policy initiated by Senator John McCain for Peabody to gain access to coal mining locations.

"Peabody mine sites don't have bonds and liners in the waste ponds. Contaminated waters are released in the headwaters after every rain, polluting the little water they leave behind. The Gold King mining disaster is just the most recent example of the kind of devastation that has been happening to the Dine for generations. Before coal, we were devastated by uranium. Now, our families are the targets of a fracking boom on federal lands in places like Chaco Canyon. Dirty energy companies ruin our lands, while the profit goes elsewhere," Benally said.

"Environmental concerns are not being addressed properly by agencies that should be accountable. Groundwater tables have dropped by big drops, the greenhouse gases being released into the air are not monitored correctly, and health impacts are not monitored at all. This devastation of our communities is a kind of terrorism made possible by Senators like John McCain, all while President Obama turns a blind eye. These industries are not accountable to the land, the natural world, or the people living here. Their destruction has to stop now.”  —Louise Benally, Big Mountain Diné Nation, Indigenous Cultural Concepts, Media Island International.

Cherri Foytlin, Bridge the Gulf"said, "I would ask that you put yourself in our place. Over five years have passed since BP's broken promises spewed as easily from their tongues as the oil did from their broken pipe. To this day our peoples and ecosystems suffer from BP's brutal, callous, and lasting assault. Five years, and our dolphins still die, our turtles still die, our oysters still die, our marshes still die, our people still die.

"BP is a corporate serial killer. BP is a terrorist organization. Yet they not only remain free to continue their patterns of destruction, they are subsidized by our government to do it. How many more graves will there be, before justice is truly served in the Gulf Coast? That is the only question we have now."

Princess Daazhraii Johnson of Resisting Environmental Destruction on Indigenous Lands (REDOIL) delivered a powerful message from Alaska.

"We are in climate crisis in Alaska, and advancing energy extraction within our ancestral territories would seriously exacerbate climate change and threaten our ability to survive in the Arctic.  Climate Change is upsetting the delicate balance in many ecosystems. There is an urgency to take action now.

"The President was in Alaska, and saw for himself the consequences of climate change.  Indigenous peoples of the North implore him to take effective action now to address the issue while we still can. If the U.S. is serious about Climate Change, rescind the Shell permits to drill in the Chukchi Sea, and permanently protect the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. We must keep the remaining fossil fuels in the ground and continue towards a just transition to alternative energies.  We do not have the luxury of time.  We can implement clean energy systems in the U.S. now." 



Climate Coalition Calls on President Obama to Halt Fossil Fuel Leasing on Public Lands, Oceans

Hundreds of Organizations, Leaders Mobilize to Keep Publicly Owned Oil, Gas, Coal--and Half of Potential Emissions from All Remaining U.S. Fossil Fuels--in the Ground 
WASHINGTON — A coalition of more than 400 organizations and leaders will deliver a historic letter to the White House  on Tuesday calling on President Obama to stop new federal fossil fuel leasing on public lands and oceans in the United States.

The letter argues that, by keeping publicly owned fossil fuels that haven’t already been leased to industry in the ground, President Obama can keep nearly half of the potential emissions from all remaining U.S. fossil fuels, up to 450 billion tons, from the global pool of potential carbon pollution.

More than 67 million acres of public land and ocean are already leased to the fossil fuel industry. That represents an area 55 times larger than Grand Canyon National Park and contains up to 43 billion tons of potential carbon pollution. Deeming unleased oil, gas and coal “unburnable” would accomplish more in the global fight against climate catastrophe than any other single climate action taken by the Obama administration.


Hundreds of prominent organizations and leaders from Alaska to Florida signed the letter, among them indigenous leaders, labor unions, scientists, religious leaders, public interest groups and climate activists, including: Bill McKibben, Winona LaDuke, Robert F. Kennedy Jr., Dr. Noam Chomsky, Dr. Michael Mann, Tim DeChristopher, Dr. Stuart Pimm, Dr. Michael Soule, United Auto Workers Union, Unitarian Universalist Association, Physicians for Social Responsibility, Protect Our Winters, 350.org, Center for Biological Diversity, Environment America, Friends of the Earth, Food & Water Watch, Indigenous Environmental Network, Oil Change International, Greenpeace, Rainforest Action Network, REDOIL, Sierra Club, Waterkeeper Alliance, WildEarth Guardians and hundreds of others.

The American public owns nearly 650 million acres of federal public land, and more than 1.7 billion acres of Outer Continental Shelf — and the fossil fuels beneath them. This includes federal public lands like national parks, national forests and wildlife refuges that make up about a third of the U.S. land area — and oceans like Alaska’s Chukchi Sea, the Gulf of Mexico and the eastern seaboard. These places and fossil fuels are held in trust for the public by the federal government; federal fossil fuel leasing is administered by the Department of the Interior.

The letter, which comes as international leaders prepare for December’s climate negotiations in Paris, calls on President Obama “to make our nation the first to commit to keeping all of its remaining, unleased public fossil fuels in the ground, thereby challenging other nations to do the same.” It concludes that “such leadership is necessary to ensure a livable climate and planet for both present and future generations.”

Download a copy of the signed letter here.

Letter signers held a press conference outside of the White House today and issued the following statements:

“If President Obama’s serious about being remembered as the president who put America on the path to solving climate change, there's a simple step he can take today to put a huge dent in the problem — and it doesn't even require Congressional approval. Every day, the federal government leases land owned by U.S. taxpayers to massive fossil fuel companies, all so they can dig huge amounts of oil, coal, and gas out of the ground and make climate change worse. In fact, 450 billion tons of carbon pollution sit beneath lands owned by U.S. taxpayers. Compare that to the 5 gigatons of carbon pollution the President's Clean Power Plan would cut by 2030, and it's pretty clear that fossil fuel extraction on public lands is a far bigger fish he can fry. That's the kind of bold, aggressive action it's going to take to solve this problem, and that's what it means to truly be a leader on climate change.” —May Boeve, Executive Director, 350.org

“Coal companies like Peabody Energy have been mining federal and tribal coal in and near native communities like mine for decades. The tribal governments allow energy companies to impound peoples’ livestock, which is the only source of income and food for communities impacted by forced removal—a legacy policy initiated by Senator John McCain for Peabody to gain access to coal mining locations. Peabody mine sites don't have bonds and liners in the waste ponds. Contaminated waters are released in the headwaters after every rain, polluting the little water they leave behind. The Gold King mining disaster is just the most recent example of the kind of devastation that has been happening to the Dine for generations. Before coal, we were devastated by uranium. Now, our families are the targets of a fracking boom on federal lands in places like Chaco Canyon. Dirty energy companies ruin our lands, while the profit goes elsewhere. Environmental concerns are not being addressed properly by agencies that should be accountable. Groundwater tables have dropped by big drops, the greenhouse gases being released into the air are not monitored correctly, and health impacts are not monitored at all. This devastation of our communities is a kind of terrorism made possible by Senators like John McCain, all while President Obama turns a blind eye. These industries are not accountable to the land, the natural world, or the people living here. Their destruction has to stop now.”  —Louise Benally, Big Mountain Diné Nation, Indigenous Cultural Concepts, Media Island International

"I would ask that you put yourself in our place. Over five years have passed since BP's broken promises spewed as easily from their tongues as the oil did from their broken pipe. To this day our peoples and ecosystems suffer from BP's brutal, callous, and lasting assault. Five years, and our dolphins still die, our turtles still die, our oysters still die, our marshes still die, our people still die... BP is a corporate serial killer. BP is a terrorist organization. Yet they not only remain free to continue their patterns of destruction, they are subsidized by our government to do it. How many more graves will there be, before justice is truly served in the Gulf Coast? That is the only question we have now." —Cherri Foytlin, Bridge the Gulf

“Each new fossil fuel lease worsens the climate crisis and shows a dangerous disconnect between Obama’s energy policies and climate rhetoric. He can’t have it both ways: Fighting climate change requires keeping fossil fuels in the ground. That work should start now by ending fossil fuel leasing on our public lands and oceans.” —Kierán Suckling, Executive Director, Center for Biological Diversity

“Climate denial is the refusal to acknowledge that fossil fuels have to stay in the ground, so the basis for any honest climate policy has to be keeping fossil fuels in the ground.” —Tim DeChristopher, Founder, Climate Disobedience Center

“The only surefire way to protect human health, clean drinking water and the global climate from coal, oil and gas is to keep them in the ground. We have fought for decades to protect communities and the environment from the negative impacts of oil and gas, and now, we call on President Obama to stand with communities and make sure that the U.S. does our part against global climate change.” —Jennifer Krill, Executive Director, Earthworks

“The best way to prevent greenhouse gases from entering the atmosphere is to leave them where they lie. You can't be a climate leader while continuing to open up large amounts of federal land to extraction and encouraging continued fossil fuel development. If President Obama is to keep his commitment to curbing climate change, he must do everything he can to keep fossil fuels in the ground and stop drilling and fracking on public lands.” —Wenonah Hauter, Executive Director, Food & Water Watch

"The ‘river of grass’ in our Florida Everglades could soon become the home of numerous fracking rigs if the U.S. continues our unsustainable policy of extracting fossil fuels. Under Florida’s antiquated laws, dangerous new fracking techniques are allowed in the state with almost no oversight.  If allowed to expand, fracking in the Florida Everglades would threaten the drinking water of millions of South Florida residents and permanently damage the ecosystem of one of our national treasures.”—Jorge Aguilar, Florida Director, Food & Water Watch

“To demonstrate strong climate leadership, President Obama needs to go beyond regulating the tailpipes and the smokestacks. The president must use all tools at his disposal, such as an executive moratorium, to stop the leasing of our public fossil fuels and keep them in the ground.” —Erich Pica, President, Friends of the Earth

“President Obama understands the urgent crisis of climate change, and yet, his administration has allowed Shell to drill in the Arctic and companies like Peabody to lease billions of tons of coal from public lands. He still has the chance to be remembered as a climate leader, but he must take bold, concrete steps to keep fossil fuels in the ground.” —Annie Leonard, Executive Director, Greenpeace

"The stakes have never been higher for Water in the West. Our small family business, Holiday River Expeditions, is completely dependent on clean, safe and abundant water running through the desert, not simply for our way of life but for survival in a desert.  Every new extraction project leased on our state's ample public lands requires water; water our state and every community along the Colorado River's drainage doesn't have the capacity to give. For us, Keeping 'it' [fossil fuels] in the ground is not only about unforeseen impacts of Climate Change, it's about our lives right here and now."—Lauren Wood, Trip Director, Holiday River Expeditions

“The president desperately needs to align his energy policy with his climate action. The simple fact is we must leave the vast majority of fossil fuels in the ground if we want any chance of a safe climate future.  In other words, when you’re in a hole it’s time to stop digging. Leasing fossil fuels on public lands is irrational and an inappropriate use of our public resources in this time of climate crisis.  It should end today.” –Stephen Kretzmann, Executive Director, Oil Change International

"It's time to put health first. Stopping federal fossil fuel leasing will help fight climate change and aid in reversing its detrimental impacts on communities' health." —Catherine Thomasson, M.D., Executive Director, Physicians for Social Responsibility

“The federal government is enabling some of the wealthiest companies in the world, with names like Exxon and Peabody, to mine and drill America’s public lands for private profit. This egregious drilling, fracking and mining is devastating the health of communities and endangering the stability of our climate. We are simply asking President Obama to stop selling off our national forests, oceans and sacred heritage sites for pennies on the dollar and slow the effects of climate change by stopping fossil fuel leasing on public lands.” —Lindsey Allen, Executive Director, Rainforest Action Network

"We are in climate crisis in Alaska, and advancing energy extraction within our ancestral territories would seriously exacerbate climate change and threaten our ability to survive in the Arctic.  Climate Change is upsetting the delicate balance in many ecosystems.  There is an urgency to take action now.  The President was in Alaska, and saw for himself the consequences of climate change.  Indigenous peoples of the North implore him to take effective action now to address the issue while we still can.  If the U.S. is serious about Climate Change, rescind the Shell permits to drill in the Chukchi Sea, and permanently protect the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. We must keep the remaining fossil fuels in the ground and continue towards a just transition to alternative energies.  We do not have the luxury of time.  We can implement clean energy systems in the U.S. now."  —Princess Daazhraii Johnson, Resisting Environmental Destruction on Indigenous Lands (REDOIL)

“The science is definitive: If we are to lessen the effects of climate change, we must leave dirty fuels in the ground. President Obama has taken historic steps to moving America toward a clean energy economy while leading the world forward. It's time he solidifies his climate legacy by stopping new oil and gas leases on federally managed lands and waters, leaving dirty fuels where they belong: in the ground.” —Michael Brune, Executive Director, Sierra Club

“Digging up these dirty fuels from America’s treasured public lands is nothing short of climate denial. With the costs of climate change mounting with every ton of coal mined and barrel of oil fracked, it's critical that the president stand behind his calls for climate action and keep our fossil fuels in the ground.” —John Horning, Executive Director, WildEarth Guardians

Additional Contacts:    
Karthik Ganapathy, 350.org, (347) 881-3784, karthik@350.org
Cherri Foytlin, Bridge the Gulf, (303) 462-4484, foytlinfam@cox.net
Louise Benally, Big Mountain Diné Nation, Indigenous Cultural Concepts, Media Island International (928) 206-1979, louisebenally6@gmail.com
Taylor McKinnon, Center for Biological Diversity, (801) 300-2414 tmckinnon@biologicaldiversity.org
Tim DeChristopher, Climate Disobedience Center, tim@timdechristopher.org
Jennifer Krill, Earthworks, (415) 336-8936, jkrill@earthworksaction.org
Darcey Rakestraw, Food & Water Watch, (202) 683-2467, drakestraw@fwwatch.org
Marissa Knodel, Friends of the Earth, (202) 222-0729, mknodel@foe.org
Kelly Mitchell, Greenpeace, (818) 282-0168, kelly.mitchell@greenpeace.org
Lauren Wood, Trip Director, Holiday River Expeditions, (801) 647-1540 lwood1988@gmail.com
David Turnbull, Oil Change International, (202) 316-3499 david@priceofoil.org
Catherine Thomasson, Physicians for Social Responsibility, (503) 819-1170 cthomasson@psr.org
Ruth Breech, Rainforest Action Network, (415) 238-1766, ruth@ran.org
Princess Lucaj, Resisting Environmental Destruction on Indigenous Lands (REDOIL), princesslucaj@gmail.com
Lena Moffitt, Sierra Club, (505) 480-1551, lena.moffitt@sierraclub.org
Tim Ream, WildEarth Guardians, (541) 531-8541, tream@wildearthguardians.org



September 15, 2015


Dear President Obama,


Climate change poses unprecedented threats to human civilization. During your term you’ve given voice to the urgency of those threats and have taken important steps to address greenhouse gas pollution. But these efforts, and the efforts of other leaders in the United States and abroad, haven’t been enough to prevent greenhouse gas emissions from reaching record levels and accelerating the world toward climate catastrophe. International initiatives to tackle carbon emissions are undermined by the continued expansion of fossil fuel development across the globe. Here at home, the longstanding U.S. policy of leasing federal public lands and oceans to corporations for coal, oil and gas extraction must end. As the world focuses on climate change in advance of negotiations in Paris this winter, we urge you to demonstrate strong climate leadership by stopping new leasing of our publicly owned fossil fuels. 


Federal leasing of publicly owned fossil fuels contributes significantly to U.S. and global greenhouse gas emissions. Over the past decade, the burning of fossil fuels from federal leasing has resulted in nearly a quarter of all U.S. energy-related emissions and nearly 4 percent of global emissions. Despite this pollution and the looming climate threat, your administration continues to lease publicly owned fossil fuels, endangering the health and welfare of communities and the planet.


Under existing federal laws, including the Mineral Leasing Act, Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act, Federal Land Policy and Management Act, and Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, you have clear authority to stop new leases. With the stroke of a pen, you could take the bold action needed to stop new federal leasing of fossil fuels, and to keep those remaining fossil fuels — our publicly owned fossil fuels — safely in the ground.
The cost of continuing federal fossil fuel leasing to our land, climate and communities is too high. The science is clear that, to maintain a good chance of avoiding catastrophic levels of warming, the world must keep the vast majority of its remaining fossil fuels in the ground. Federal fossil fuels — those that you control — are the natural place to begin. Each new federal fossil fuel lease opens new deposits for development that should be deemed unburnable. By placing those deposits off limits, stopping new leasing would help align your administration's energy policy with a safer climate future and global carbon budgets. With so many of our federal public lands and waters already leased, it is time to stop selling even more of these public fossil fuels to be extracted and burned.


Up to 450 billion tons of potential greenhouse gas pollution could be immediately removed from the global pool of potential climate pollution by stopping new federal leasing. To address the climate crisis, our national energy policy must curb fossil fuel demand and production. As the world’s largest historic cumulative polluter and a global economic leader, the imperative for U.S. climate leadership is paramount. As the climate negotiations in Paris approach, a U.S. commitment to stop new fossil fuel leasing would set an important precedent in the global fight to keep fossil fuels in the ground.  


Federal public lands and waters — such as our national parks, monuments, forests, wildlife refuges and oceans — are cherished resources for us all. They embody deep and diverse cultural values and provide clean air and water, recreation and solitude, and refuge for endangered wildlife.  Yet your administration alone has leased nearly 15 million acres of public land and 21 million acres of ocean for fossil fuel industrialization. In total more than 67 million acres — an area 55 times larger than Grand Canyon National Park — is already leased to the fossil fuel industry.  


Stopping new leasing would help secure the legacy of our public lands. It would safeguard our air and water from dirty energy pollution; ensure the health of communities that have lived in energy sacrifice zones for generations; and keep our last, best wildlife habitat from being lost to fossil fuel industrialization. By stopping new leasing, you would begin to resolve some of our nation’s most contentious fossil fuel conflicts, including:


  • Powder River Basin coal mining and oil and gas drilling;
  • Arctic oil and gas drilling and fracking;
  • Gulf of Mexico offshore drilling and fracking;
  • National forest and grassland fracking and coal mining;
  • Atlantic seaboard detonations for seismic exploration;
  • California onshore and offshore fracking;
  • Colorado River Basin oil shale and tar sands extraction;
  • Four Corners-area fracking and coal mining pollution.


Stopping federal fossil fuel leasing also makes economic sense. According to the federal government’s own estimates, the burning of our publicly owned fossil fuels costs society between $16 billion and $155 billion in climate-related damages per year. As you’ve noted, the unparalleled potential for clean energy jobs in the renewable energy and efficiency sectors are the path to a just transition for a clean energy future.


For these reasons we, the undersigned, call on you to use your existing executive authority to stop new leasing of our remaining, publicly owned fossil fuels. We call on you to make our nation the first to commit to keeping all of its remaining, unleased public fossil fuels in the ground, thereby challenging other nations to do the same. Such leadership is necessary to ensure a livable climate and planet for both present and future generations.  
Sincerely,


Groups
Individuals (institutional affiliations are for identification purposes only)

A Glimpse of the Wild
Natalie Shuttleworth, Managing Director, CEO

ACTION United
Craig Robbins, Executive Director

Alaska Applied Sciences, Inc.
William C. Leighty, Principal

Alaska Community Action on Toxics
Pamela Miller, Executive Director

Alive Today Enterprises
P. Galbavy, Director

Alive Today Enterprises, LLC
Marty Landa, Managing Member

Allegheny Defense Project
Ryan Talbott, Executive Director

Amazon Watch
Leila Salazar-López, Executive Director

Angelica Foundation
James Gollin, Director

Animals Are Sentient Beings, Inc.
Sarah B. Stewart, President

Arise for Social Justice
Frank Cincotta, Environemntal Justice Coordinator

Arise for Social Justice
Michaelann Bewsee, Executive Director

Asian Pacific Environmental Network
Miya Yoshitani, Executive Director

Assateague Coastal Trust
Kathy Phillips, Executive Director/Assateague Coastkeeper

Association for the Tree of Life
Michael Mielke, Co-founder

Athens County Fracking Action Network
Heather Cantino, Steering Committee Chair

Atlantic Energy
Charmian Larke, Director

Austin Green Energy Group
Bernie Johnson, President & CEO

Avaaz
Ricken Patel, Executive Director

Aytzim: Ecological Judaism
David Krantz, President

Bark
Amy Harwood, Executive Director

Be the Change
Phillip T. Doe, Environmental Director

Berkeley Partners for Parks
John Steere, President

Berks Gas Truth
Karen Feridun, Founder

Beyond Extreme Energy

Big Blackfoot Riverkeeper, Inc.
Jerry O'Connell, Executive Director

Bioneers
Nina Simons, President

Blue Frontier
David Helvarg, Executive Director

Blue Skies Campaign
Nick Engelfried, Coordinator

Blue Water Ventures, LLC
David Thoreson, President

Breast Cancer Action
Karuna Jaggar, Executive Director

Breathe CA
Linda Civitello, CEO

Breathe Easy Susquehanna County BESC
Rebecca Roter, Chairperson and Co-Founder

Buckeye Forest Council
Teresa Mills, Program Director

Buckleberry Fern
Stephanie Kimball, Executive Director

Bus Project
Nikki Fisher, Executive Director

Care2 Inc.
Randy Paynter, Founder and CEO

Carolina Biodiesel, LLC
John Dreyfors, Founding Manager

Cascadia Wildlands
Josh Laughlin, Executive Director

Center for a Sustainable Coast
David Kyler, Executive Director

Center for Biological Diversity
Kierán Suckling, Executive Director

Center for Community Change Action
Deepak Pateriya, Chief of Staff

Center for Environmental Health
Michael Green, Executive Director

Center for Marine Science
Daniel Baden, Director

Center for Media and Democracy
Lisa Graves, Executive Director

Center for Popular Democracy and Action for the Common Good
Andrew Friedman, Co-Executive Director

Center of Concern
Lester A. Myers, President

Christians Caring for Creation
Connie Hanson, Director

Chukchi Sea Watch
Ceal Smith, Executive Director

Circle Pines Center
Tom VanHammen, Center Director

Citizens Against Ruining the Environment
Ellen Rendulich, Director

Citizens Coal Council
Aimee Erickson, Executive Director

Citizens' Climate Lobby
Mark Reynolds, Executive Director

Citizens' Climate Lobby
Cher Gilmore, Group Leader, Santa Clarita Chapter

Citizens' Climate Lobby
Dave Massen, San Francisco Chapter Leader

Citizens' Environmental Coalition
Barbara Warren, Executive Director

Citizens Coalition for a Safe Community
Paul Ferrazzi, Executive Director

Clean Air Now
James J. Provenzano, President

Clean Air Watch
Frank O'Donnell, President

Clean Energy Action
Anne Butterfield, President

Clean Water for North Carolina
Hope Taylor, Executive Director

Clean Water Now
Roger E. Butow, Executive Director

Climate Action Now!
Markos Major, Director

Climate Justice Alliance
Michael Leon Guerrero, National Coordinator

Climate Solutions
Gregg Small, Executive Director

Climate Voices US
Harvard Ayers, Executive Director

ClimateTruth.org
Brant Olson, Campaign Director

Coal River Mountain Watch
Vernon Haltom, Executive Director

Coastal Monmouth Democratic Club
Kathy Maher, President

CODEPINK
Jodie Evans, Co-founder

Columbia Gorge Climate Action Network
Eric Strid, Co-Principal

Columbia Riverkeeper
Brett VandenHeuvel, Executive Director

Common Stream
Peter Snoad, Program Director

Community Science Center
Denny Larson, Executive Director

Concerned Citizens of Medina County (Ohio)
Kathie Jones, Co-Founder

Concerned Friends of Ferry County
DL Robinson, CEO

Conservation Northwest
Mitch Friedman, Executive Director

Cook Inletkeeper
Bob Shavelson, Inletkeeper

Corporate Accountability International
Kelle Louaillier, Executive Director

CRG
Martha Girolami, Director

Connecticut Citizen Action Group (CCAG)
Tom Swan, Executive Director

Cultivating Connections
Mark Steiner, Executive Director

CURE (Clean Up the River Environment)
Duane Ninneman, Executive Director

Delaware Riverkeeper Network
Tracy Carluccio, Deputy Director

Demos
Heather McGhee, President

DeSmogBlog
Brendan DeMelle, Executive Director

Don't Waste Arizona
Stephen Brittle, President

Earth Day Network
Kathleen Rogers, President

Earth Ethics
Mary Gutierrez, Executive Director

Earthworks
Jennifer Krill, Executive Director

East Bay Community Solar Project
Spencer Veale, Project Coordinator

East Michigan Environmental Action Council
Diana Copeland, Co-Director

Eco-Justice Collaborative
Lan R. Richart, Co-Director

Eco-Justice Ministries
Rev. Peter Sawtell, Executive Director

EcoEquity
Tom Athanasiou, Director

Ecohermanas
Angela Adrar, President

Ecology Party of Florida
Cara L. Campbell, Chair

Ecosystems
Richard J. Mastic, CEO

Elder Creek Center For The Land
Brien Brennan, Co-founder

Energy & Policy Institute
Gabe Elsner, Executive Director

Energy Action Coalition
Lydia Avila, Executive Director

Environment America
Margie Alt, Executive Director

Environment and Human Rights Advisory
Tom Kerns, Executive Director

Environment New Jersey
Doug O'Malley, Director

Environmental Action
Drew Hudson, Executive Director

Environmental Action Committee of West Marin
Amy Trainer, J.D., Executive Director

Environmental Protection Information Center
Natalynne DeLapp, Executive Director

Environmental Youth Council
W. Hunter Miller, Director

Fairmont, MN Peace Group
Judi Poulson, Chair

Food and Water Watch
Wenonah Hauter, Executive Director

ForestEthics
Kristin Chester Vance, Deputy Director

ForestEthics
Todd Paglia, Executive Director

Formula Consultants Inc.
Craig Preston, Director of Administration

Forward Together
Eveline Shen, Executive Director

Fossil Free & Green NY
Stacey Smith, Director

Four Harbors Audubon
Susan Krause, President

Frack Free Colorado
Razz Gormley, Associate Director

Fractivist.org
Shane Davis, Executive Director

Fresnans Against Fracking
Gary Lasky, President

Friends of the Bitterroot
Larry Campbell, Conservation Director

Friends of the Earth
Erich Pica, President

GAIA
Monica Wilson, U.S. Director

GARDEN, Inc.
Susan Silverman, Executive Director

Glen Canyon Institute
Eric Balken, Programs Director

Global Exchange
Ashley Cline, Interim Executive Director

Global Green U.S.A.
Les McCabe, President and CEO

Grand Canyon Wildlands Council
Kelly Burke, Executive Director

Grassroots Environmental Education
Patricia Wood, Executive Director

Grassroots Global Justice Alliance
Cindy Wiesner, National Coordinator

Great Lakes Bioneers Detroit
Gloria Rivera, Coordinator

Great Old Broads for Wilderness
Shelley Silbert, Executive Director

Green America
Fran Teplitz, Executive Co-Director

Greenbelt Climate Action Network
Lore Rosenthal, Program Coordinator

Greener Way Associates
Suzanne DeBenedittis, Ph.D, Executive Director

Greenpeace
Annie Leonard, Executive Director

Hartford Advisory Committee on the Environment
JoAnne Bauer, Ph.D, Chair

Heartwood
Ernie Reed, Council Chair

High Country Conservation Advocates
Michele Simpson, Executive Director

Hilton Head for Peace
Dr. F. Taylor, Coordinator

Holiday River Expeditions
John Wood, President

Holy Cross International Justice Office
Mary Turgi, Director

Honor the Earth
Winona LaDuke, Executive Director

Houstonians Against Tar Sands
Benjamin Franklin Craft-Rendon, Co-Founder

Idle No More San Francisco Bay
Pennie Opal Plant, Co-founder

Indigenous Environmental Network
Tom BK Goldtooth, Executive Director

Indigenous People's Power Project
Marty Aranaydo, Coordinator

Information Network for Responsible Mining
Jennifer Thurston, Director

International Union, UAW
Dennis D. Williams, President

IOWA 350
Cheryl Valenta, Executive Director

Justice, Peace and Sustainability Office - IHM Sisters of Monroe, Michigan
Sarah Nash, Coordinator

Kalmiopsis Audubon Society
Ann Vileisis, President

Kentuckians For The Commonwealth
Dana Beasley Brown, Statewide Chairperson

Klamath Forest Alliance
Kimberly Baker, Executive Director

Klamath Riverkeeper
Konrad Fisher, Executive Director

Kootenai Environmental Alliance
Adrienne Cronebaugh, Executive Director

KS Wild
Joseph Vaile, Executive Director

Kyoto USA
Thomas Kelly, Executive Director

Labor Network for Sustainability
Joe Uehlein, Executive Director

LEAD Agency, Inc.
Earl L. Hatley, Grand Riverkeeper, Oklahoma

Leave it in the Ground Initiative (LINGO)
Kjell Kühne, Founder

Little Village Environmental Justice Organization
Antonio Lopez, Executive Director

Living Rivers & Colorado Riverkeeper
John Weisheit, Conservation Director

Los Alamos Study Group
Gregory Mello, Executive Director

Louisiana Bucket Brigade
Anne Rolfes, Founding Director

Louisiana Environmental Action Network
Marylee Orr, Executive Director

Lower Mississippi Riverkeeper
Paul Orr

Marine & Environmental Research Institute
Susan Shaw, Executive Director

Matanzas Riverkeeper
Neil A. Armingeon

Mid-Missouri Peaceworks/Missourians for Safe Energy
Mark Haim, Director

Midshore Riverkeeper Conservancy
Timothy Junkin, Executive Director

Miss R*EVOLutionaries
Sherry Lear, Direct Action Coordinator

Moms Clean Air Force
Dominique Browning, Senior Director

Mountain Watershed Association
Beverly Braverman, Executive Director

Movement Generation
Mateo Nube, Co-Director

National Audubon Society
St. Paul Audubon Society, President

National Domestic Workers Alliance | La Alianza Nacional de Trabajadoras del Hogar
Andrea Cristina Mercado, Campaign Director

National People's Action
George Goehl, Executive Director

NEOGAP
Daniel G. Philipps, President

New Energy Economy
Mariel Nanasi, Executive Director

New Mexico Interfaith Power and Light
Joan Brown, Executive Director

New Place Fund
Andre Carothers, Director

New Priorities Foundation
Nancy Schaub, President

North Shore Audubon Society
Joyce Bryk, Co-President

Northern Alaska Environmental Center
Elisabeth Dabney, Executive Director

Nuclear Information and Resource Service
Michael Mariotte, President

OC Chapter of Citizens Climate Lobby
Mark Tabbert, Founder

Ocean Conservation Research
Michael Stocker, Director

Ohio Valley Environmental Coalition
Janet Keating, Executive Director

Oil Change International
Stephen Kretzmann, Executive Director

One World Adventure
Angie Shugart, Administrative Director

Oregon Coast Alliance
Cameron La Follette, Executive Director

Organic Consumers Association
Ronnie Cummins, Director

Our Children's Trust
Julia Olson, Executive Director

PACWA
Denise Garrott

Partnership for Policy Integrity
Mary S. Booth, Director

Peace Action of Staten Island
Eileen Bardel, Chair

Pennsylvania Alliance for Clean Water and Air
Co- director

Pennsylvania Council of Churches
Rev. Sandra L. Strauss, Director of Advocacy & Ecumenical Outreach

Physicians for Social Responsibility
Catherine Thomasson, Executive Director

Physicians for Social Responsibility, AZ Chapter
Barbara H. Warren, MD, MPH, Director

Pipeline Awareness Southern Oregon
Stacey McLaughlin, Chair

Preserve Wild Santee
Van Collinsworth, Executive Director

Prince William Soundkeeper
Kate McLaughlin, President & Executive Director

Protect All Children's Environment
Elizabeth M.T. O'Nan, Director

Protect Our Winters
Chris Steinkamp, Executive Director

PSR Arizona
Barbara H. Warren, Director

Public Citizen
Robert Weissman, President

Rachel's Network
Thu Pham, President

Rainforest Action Network
Lindsey Allen, Executive Director

REDOIL
Faith Gemmill, Executive Director

Redwood Alliance
Michael Welch, Director

Renewable Energy Long Island
Gordian Raacke, Executive Director

RESTORE: The North Woods
Michael Kellett, Executive Director

Right to the City Alliance
Rachel LaForest, Executive Director

Rincon-Vitova Insectaries, Inc.
Jan Dietrick, President

River Guardian Foundation
George Matthis, President

Rogue Climate
Hannah Sohl, Executive Director

Rogue Riverkeeper
Forrest English, Program Director

Russian Riverkeeper
Don McEnhill, Executive Director

Sacred River Healing
Alan Levin, President

Safe Climate Campaign
Dan Becker, Director

San Bernardino Audubon Society
Brad Singer, President

San Jose Peace and Justice Center
Lauren, Coordinator

Save Our Sky Blue Waters
Lori Andresen, Director

SAVE THE FROGS!
Kerry Kriger, Executive Director

Save The River
Lee Willbanks, Riverkeeper, Executive Director

Save the Sespe
Leif Dautch, Founder

Sea Shepherd Legal
Catherine Pruett, Executive Director

Sequoia ForestKeeper
Ara Marderosian, Executive Director

Sierra Club
Michael Brune, Executive Director

Signal Fire
Ryan Pierce, Program Coordinator

Sisters of the Holy Cross
Ann Oestreich, IHM, Congregation Justice Coordinator

Sitka Conservation Society
Andrew Thoms, Executive Director

SLO Clean Water
Jeanne Blackwell, Director

Small Planet Institute and Fund
Anna Lappé, Author and Co-founder

South Florida Audubon Society
Grant Campbell, Director of Wildlife Policy/Conservation Chair

South Florida Wildlands Association
Matthew Schwartz, Executive Director

Southeast Alaska Conservation Council
Malena Marvin, Executive Director

Stewards of the Earth
Lupe Anguiano, Founder, Executive Director

Stop the Frack Attack Network
Stop the Frack Attack Network Advisory Council

Surfrider Foundation
Pete Stauffer, Environmental Director

Sustainable Energy & Economic Development (SEED) Coalition
Karen Hadden, Executive Director

Sustainable Energy & Economy Network
Daphne Wysham, Director

Sustainable Tompkins
Thomas Shelkley, Chair of Board of Directors

Sustainable Tompkins
Gay Nicholson, President

SustainUS
Adam Hasz, Chair

TEDX, The Endocrine Disruption Exchange
Carol Kwiatkowski, Executive Director

Tellus Institute
Allen White, Vice President

Tennessee Riverkeeper
David Whiteside, Founder & Executive Director

Texas Drought Project
Alyssa Burgin, Executive Director

The Lands Council
Mike Petersen, Executive Director

The Leighty Foundation
William C. Leighty, Director

The Question Alliance
Jim and Diane Schrack, Co-Founders

The Shalom Center
Rabbi Arthur Waskow, Executive Director

Tikkun & The Network of Spiritual Progressives
Rabbi Michael Lerner, Editor in Chief, Tikkun Magazine

Turtle Island Restoration Network
Todd Steiner, Executive Director

U.S. Climate Plan
Evan Weber, Executive Director

Unitarian Universalist Association
Rev. Peter Morales, President

Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Binghamton
Wes Ernsberger, Chair

Unitarian Universalist Food Justice Ministry
Rev. Peggy Clarke, Chair

Unitarian Universalist Young Adults for Climate Justice
Alyssa Tharp, Network Coordinator

Uyalunaq
Allison Warden, CEO

Wall of Women Colorado
Paddy McClelland, Assistant Director

Washington Community Action Network
Will Pittz, Executive Director

Waterkeeper Alliance
Marc Yaggi, Executive Director

West Virginia Highlands Conservancy
Cynthia D. Ellis, President

Western Environmental Law Center
Erik Schlenker-Goodrich, Executive Director

Western Lands Project
Janine Blaeloch, Director

Western NY Drilling Defense
Charley Bowman, Leader

Wild Equity Institute
Brent Plater, Executive Director

Wild Virginia
Ernie Reed, President

WildEarth Guardians
John Horning, Executive Director

Wilderness Watch
George Nickas, Executive Director

Wilderness Workshop
Sloan Shoemaker, Executive Director

WindSoHy
Joe Spease, CEO

Winter Wildlands Alliance
Mark Menlove, Executive Director

Winyah Rivers Foundation Inc.
Christine Ellis, Deputy Director

Women's Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN)
Osprey-Orielle Lake, Founder/Executive Director

Women's Voices for the Earth
Erin Switalski, Executive Director

World Temperate Rainforest Network
Pat Rasmussen, Coordinator

www.workersdefense.org
Cristina Tzintzun, Executive Director

Xun Biosphere Project
Jon Anderholm, Director

Zero Waste Kauai
John Harder, President

350.org
May Boeve, Executive Director

350 Brooklyn
350Brooklyn, Coordinator

350 Chicago
Melissa Brice, Founder

350 Colorado
Micah Parkin, Executive Director

350 DC
Gary Rossi, Steering Chair

350 Eugene
Debra McGee, Co-Founder/NoLNG Action Lead

350 Idaho
Gretchen Casey, Co-director

350 KC
John Fish Kurmann, Lead Coordinator

350 Kishwaukee
Meryl Greer Domina, Co-President

350 Loudoun
Natalie C. Pien, Chair

350 NYC
Lyna Hinkel, Group Leader

350 PDX
Adriana Voss-Andreae, President

350 Sacramento
Laurie Litman, President

350 Santa Barbara
Rebecca Claassen, Founder

350 South Florida
Jim Harper, President

350 Seattle.org
Lynn Fitz-Hugh, Coordinator

Ed Averill

Rowan Baker, Independent environmental consultant

Carolyn Barndt, Concerned Citizen
WildEarth Guardians Supporter

Chris Bekemeier

Lowen Berman, Member
Climate Action Coalition

Jimmy Betts, Organizer
The Qualmless

S. Tom Bond

John Boonstra, Convenor
Columbia Gorge Climate Action Network

Ron Bottorff, Chairman
Friends of the Santa Clara River

Mrs. Janet L. Bradley
Compressor and Pipeline Opposition in Windsor, MA

David Braun
Americans Against Fracking

Bonnie Bristow

John Bruno, Professor, Marine Ecologist
UNC Chapel Hill

Pamela Burrell, Co-Chair
Apollo Kaua'i

John F. Byrne, Team leader
Sierra Club National Parks and Monuments Team

Kathy Callaway, Board Chair
Mainstreet Moms

Rosemary Carey, Organizer
350 New Jersey

Tommee Carlisle, Quaker
Multnomah Friends Meeting

Susan Carrillo

Rachel Case, Sole proprietor
Heart and Sole

Noam Chomsky, Professor, retired
MIT

Rev. Peggy Clarke, Convener
UU Environmental Justice Collaboratory

Clay G. Colson, Board Director and Water Issues Chair
Citizens for Sanity.Com, Inc.

Joanne Corey, Member
Vestal Residents for Safe Energy

Katharine Cotrell, Mother
Greenpeace

Pauline Seales
350 Santa Cruz

Amelia Diehl, Activist
UUYACJ

Dottie JI, Treasurer
Central Jersey Coalition Against Endless War

Maria Drews, Co-coordinator
350 Madison

Marian Duggan-Markos, Freelance Athropod

Jill Duvall, Co-organizer
ECOGIG

Robert Eagle, Research Scientist
UCLA and Caltech

Jack Eidt, Organizer
Tar Sands Action SoCal

Rosanne Emery

Pamela S. Evers, Attorney at Law
EntrepreneurShop, LLC

Alisandro Fernandez, Intern
New Energy Economy

Paul Fieber, Member
350 Madison

Lori Fischer, Grandmother in Nebraska

Marian Fish, Member
350 PDX

Michelle Fournier, Spokes Council Representative
350 Maine

Ed Friedman, Chairman
Friends of Merrymeeting Bay

Jeanne Fudala
Climate Change Action Group

Mal Gaff

Joe Galliani, Organizer
South Bay 350 Climate Action Group

Andrew George, Lecturer
UNC Chapel Hill School of Government

Steve Gilbert, Special Projects Manager
South Carolina Wildlife Federation

Michael S. Goodman,
350.org

Lance Green, Co-Chair
Sustainable Madison Committee

Barbara Gummere

Alex Hall, Professor, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
UCLA

Stephen Hams, Volunteer
Citizens' Climate Lobby

Albert Hardy

Anna Hawken, Vice Chair of RAN board
Rainforest Action Network

Katharine Hayhoe, Atmospheric Scientist
Texas Tech University

Susan F. Haywood, Sole proprietor
RetroRentalsPDX

Lorraine Heller
Raging Grannies

Tom Helm

Jason Henderson, Membership and Outreach Director
COSEIA

Linda Hillman

Karen Holl, Professor
University of California, Santa Cruz

Cathy Holt, Member
Transition Asheville

Jed Holtzman, Board of Directors
350 Bay Area

Jennifer Hombach, Co-chair
350 Philadelphia

Catherine Hunt

Arthur Hynes, Board Member
350 Vermont

Nancy C. Jacques, Board of Advisors
Glen Canyon Institute

Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.

Joana Kirchhoff, Member
Portland Raging Grannies

Jamie Klem
Auraria Community Club

Malte Klesen, Member of Steering Committee
350 Connecticut

Stephen P. Kunz, Senior Ecologist
Schmid & Company, Inc., Consulting Ecologists

J'Ulene Laque
Your True Colors Inc.

Stuart Liebowitz, Board Member
Douglas County Global Warming Coalition

Joyannah Lonnes, Volunteer
Citizens' Climate Lobby

Russell Lowes, Research Director

Loraine Lundquist, Sustainability Lecturer
California State University, Northridge

Michael Mann, Climatologist and geophysicist, Director of the Earth System Science Center at Pennsylvania State University

Sharon Markenson,
Climate Reality Project

Ben Martin

M. McCloskey

Bill McKibben, Author & 350.org Co-founder

Nicola Moelter, Member
350 San Diego

Barbara Moulton

Kelly O'Hanley, Member
Portland Climate Action Coalition

Corey E. Olsen, Owner/Activist
CEO Pipe Organs/Golden Ponds Farm

Brenna St. Onge, Events and Community Engagement Manager
Alliance For Sustainable Colorado

Jeff Ordower
Missourians Organizing for Reform and Empowerment

Audrey Ortega, Organizer
Arise for Social Justice

Stuart Ours
Sierra Club

Scott Parkin, Core Collective Member
Rising Tide North America

Howard Pellett
Living Democracy—Skagit

Dr. Arnold Piacentini
Pro Se

Stuart L. Pimm, Doris Duke Professor of Conservation Ecology, Duke University's Nicholas School of the Environment

Joan Poss, Field Instructor for WILPF interns
WILPF

Nancy Price, Campaign Steering Committee member
Women's International League for Peace & Freedom, U.S. Section/Earth Democracy Campaign

Scott B. Price, CPA
Scott B. Price & Company

Bus For Progress, Treasurer
Bus For Progress

Rick Rappaport
Climate Action Coalition

Richard Reading, Ph.D.
University of Denver

Robert B. Richardson, Associate Professor
Michigan State University

Carolyn E. Ricketts, Climate Steward
CSGA

Shelby Robinson, Team Leader
350 Ft. Collins

Reverend Joseph Santos-Lyons,
Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon (APANO)

Carrie Schudda, Atty.

Celia Scott, Co-chair
Friends of the Pogonip

Gudrun Scott, RN, Member
Center for Biological Diversity

Sandy Simon
Citizens' Climate Lobby

Christopher D. Sims, Faith Leader
Unitarian Universalist Association

Adam B. Smith, Assistant Scientist of Global Change
Missouri Botanical Garden

Jeff Smith, Co-chair
350 Missoula

Sister Mary Ann Smith, Social Concerns Officer
Maryknoll Sisters Eastern Region USA

Joseph Stenger

Elliot Stern, Business Development
AllTherm/SolarLogic

Alina M. Szmant, Adjunct Professor of Marine Biology
Center for Marine Science

Dr. Dan Terpstra, Moderator
Fossil Free PCUSA

Jamie Throgmorton

Cynthia Tiedeman

Aradhna Tripati, Assistant Professor
UCLA

Mary Turgi, Co-chair
Sisters of the Holy Cross Congregation Justice Committee

Sandra Vanderstoep, Consultant
Alliance for Sustainable Colorado

Charity Vincent, Artist

Lib Hutchby and John Wagner, Water Committee
Triangle Women's International League for Peace and Freedom

Kimberly Wasserman, 2013 Goldman Environmental Prize Recipient

Shoshana Wechsler
Sunflower Alliance

Kimi Wei, Chief Bottle Washer
The Wei

Lesley Weinstock, PA
AVAT

Jill Wiener, Member
Catskill Citizens for Safe Energy

Jerry Williams,Vice Chairman
Ouachita Watch League

Lauren Wood

Cynthia Wright
C. Wright, Inc.

Len Yannielli, Community Outreach Director
Committee for a Cultural/Environmental Center - Gunntown Road

Russell Zerbo, Advocacy Coordinator
Clean Air Council

350 DC Volunteer
350 DC

No comments:

Censored News PayPal



Censored News depends on reader donations for live coverage. brendanorrell@gmail.com

Censored News Copyrights

Copyrights of Censored News content are maintained by all writers, photographers and anyone whose work appears on Censored News. No content may be used without permission. No content may be used in any revenue scheme. brendanorrell@gmail.com