Tuesday, July 3, 2018

Lakota Tony Black Feather 'American Flag represents racism, oppression and violation of Natural Law'


Tony Black Feather, Lakota, on the Stronghold
in Badlands in 2002, protecting remains of ancestors
who Ghost Danced here after Wounded Knee Massacre.
Photo Brenda Norrell.


Lakota Tony Black Feather 'American Flag represents racism, oppression and violation of Natural Law'

By Brenda Norrell 
Censored News
(Oct. 1, 2002) STRONGHOLD TABLE, S.D. Lakota elder Tony Black Feather told the United Nations that the American flag represents a racist nation that violates natural and spiritual laws, dishonors treaties and engages in a game plan of corporate greed.
In his statement delivered to the United Nations and distributed here on Stronghold Table, Black Feather pressed for disarmament and peace as President Bush pressed for war in Iraq.
Urging America to “come clean in the eyes of the world,” Black Feather said people often ask him about the red, white and blue of the American flag
“I tell them that the aboriginal Lakota people of this country look at this flag as a piece of red, white and blue cloth that stands for the foreign racist system that has oppressed Indigenous peoples for centuries.
“For traditional Lakota people, that piece of red, white and blue cloth stands for a system and a country that does not honor it’s own word.”
Black Feather, in his statement to the Working Group on Indigenous Populations, said the flag represents a nation of dishonor.“If it stood for honor and truth, it would remember our treaties and give them the appropriate place under international law. But it doesn’t. It dishonors its own word and violates its treaties, that piece of red, white and blue cloth.”
On the Stronghold, Black Feather distributed his written statement, which was delivered to the United Nations in July, as he challenged the National Park Service in the Badlands. Ignoring demands from the tribe, the Park Service plans to excavate fossils in the burial grounds of the Ghost Dancers massacred here after they survived the massacre of Wounded Knee.
“America is a world problem,” Black Feather told National Park Service officials leading a tour in the Badlands of the proposed excavation site on Oglala Sioux tribal land.Lakota gathered here say the bones of the Ghost Dancers, who danced here to bring back the buffalo and the old ways, are revealing themselves at this time for a reason.With a message for humanity and calling for disarmament around the world, Black Feather chastised the Park Service for entering sacred grounds in the Badlands with armed park rangers.At the resistance camp manned by the Tokala Warrior Society, the
traditional Grey Eagle Society, Russell Means and others chastised National Park Service officials.Pointing out violations of federal laws, Lakota said the arrogance nd racism is indicative of federal Indian policy and a nation that is spiritually bankrupt.Black Feather’s comments on deception and the flag were representative of the situation here.
Black Feather said of the American flag, “This colorful cloth represents imperialism with the professed Christian duty to destroy many races of peoples throughout the world, to illegally confiscate their possessions, property and even their lives when U.S. interests need to be served.“
It is their intention to establish one world government, based solely on the American system of corporate greed.
“The cloth represents a political language that is designated to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable. This piece of red, white and blue cloth represents a political system that is contrary to the principles of Natural Law and the moral principles, which govern a diversified humanity.
“This piece of cloth misrepresents the human race.
“As Lakota people, we engage in different actions to remember the Natural Law and to assert our rights.”
Black Feather said the takeover of the Oglala Sioux Tribal Council offices and the current resistance on Stronghold Table asserts the rights of the Lakota people.
“As the aboriginal people of this land, we must understand and assert that it is under our care. The continents of the world belong to its aboriginal peoples.
“Someday somebody will have to account for these violations of the Natural Law and violations against Creation that the piece of cloth has been responsible for.
“The United States needs to come clean to cleanse its conscience in the eyes of the world. Only then will we have justice and balance in this world.”
Black Feather’s statement was among those of the Tetuwan Oyate Teton Sioux Nation Treaty Council, delivered to the XXth Session of the Working Group on Indigenous Populations in July and on Stronghold Table in August.

Tony Black Feather: Black Hills and Iraq: U.S. invasions and occupations are for land, resources, gold and oil
(April 2003) STRONGHOLD -- United Nations Representative Tony Black Feather, Lakota, said if the world wants to understand the invasion and occupation of Iraq, ask an Indian.
“Our territory was liberated by the Americans when gold was discovered in the Black Hills,” Black Feather said of the gold rush 153 years ago.
The same United States government invading the Middle East assaulted the sovereignty and self-determination of Indian Nations, Black Feather said.
“The world must stand together against tyranny.”
Iraq is the latest chapter in the American colonial process, profiteering from words like “democracy” and “human rights.”
American interests profit from the land, resources, gold and oil during the conquests, he said.
Black Feather spoke April 12 on Stronghold Table as he gathered with the Tokala, traditional warrior society of Crazy Horse.
Tokala are fortifying and expanding Lakota resistance camps to protect the gravesites of the Ghost Dancers massacred here in the 1890s.
The National Park Service plans a fossil excavation here, on Oglala Sioux land in the Badlands, even though Lakota warned the Park Service to halt the dig in this sacred Lakota cemetery.
“This is our land! We can not lose!” George Tall, Tokala, told the gathering on Stronghold Table at the site of the massacre.
“The spirits called us back again,” said Jim Toby Big Boy, as Lakota gathered, ready to protect the fragile Badlands.
Black Feather said the Lakota Nation has experienced the weight of American imperialism and prays for a true and sacred peace based on justice.
“The Lakota Nation stands with all those states in the United Nations calling for an end to American aggression,” he said.
Black Feather said the war in Iraq was for oil and recalled a visit to Iraq in the 1990s. At that time, an Iraqi woman told him, “They want our oil and they will kill us to get it.”
“Divide, starve and conquer,” was the tactic used against American Indians and it is now being used against the Middle East, he said.
“We are hopeful that our world of nations will stand together against the abuser, the schoolyard bully and the violator of international law.”
Black Feather said the United States and Britain lost the war politically and morally.
“The right to self-determination applies to all people.”
Black Feather repeated his words to the United Nations, first said in Geneva in 1998.
“The threat to human rights, self-determination and sovereignty over our unique cultures cannot be tolerated at any level.
“No nation-state, despite its superior economic or military power can be permitted to control the lives of the world’s people.”
Black Feather is spokesman for the Tetuwan Oyate, Teton Sioux Nation Treaty Council, at the United Nations Working Group on Indigenous Populations.
The Treaty Council was founded in 1894, four years after the slaughter of women and children at the massacre of Wounded Knee.
The Treaty Council was established to enforce the provisions of treaties, which the United States has abrogated, attempting to force Sioux into servitude, he said.
Lakota struggling here on Stronghold Table, at times without food and water, are prepared to defend their spiritual trust.
Tall told the gathering on Stronghold Table it is time for sovereign home rule here, reflecting the true wishes of the Lakota people. He said Lakota are prepared for a true democracy, first born on this continent by the Iroquois.

Copyright Brenda Norrell

1 comment:

galerie sochi said...

thank you for posting.

and for your tireless reporting.