August 2020

Indigenous Peoples and Human Rights

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

More than 500 New Mexicans attend Environmental Day at the Roundhouse

Photo Beata Tsosie-Peña , Rachele Agoyo and Elisa Lucero.

500-plus New Mexicans attend Environment Day at the Roundhouse

By Sierra Club
Censored News

More than 500 environmental activists descended on the New Mexico Roundhouse on Tuesday to learn about critical climate, air, land and wildlife legislation, get tips on lobbying their elected representatives and hear heartbreaking testimonials of those living with the everyday consequences of oil, gas and coal extraction. 


“I don’t feel safe in my own home,” said Penny Aucoin, who was at home near Carlsbad last week when a nearby WPX pipe burst and showered Aucoin and her husband as well as their animals with fracking wastewater. “I did not ask for this. I signed no contracts warning me about this risk. Where is the advocacy and help for families who become victims?  Protocol needs to be put into place so that this doesn’t not happen to anyone else ever.” 

Lisa DeVille: Opposing Gutting the National Environmental Policy Act





Lisa DeVille: Opposing Gutting the National Environmental Policy Act

Letter to the Editor
By Lisa DeVille,  Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara
Mandaree, North Dakota
January 28, 2020


Native communities have very few opportunities to voice our concern about major projects such as drilling, highways, pipelines right-of-ways, and industrial waste sites in our backyard.  Yet the Trump Administration is trying to remove the few opportunities we do have by gutting the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). I stand in strong opposition to the proposed changes, which will without a doubt add poison to our air, dirty our water, and impact our health for generations.  Gutting the 40-year-old NEPA regulations will result in less public comment, companies writing their own environmental reviews, bulldozed burial sites. We cannot afford to lose our voice in what happens in Fort Berthold and beyond.