August 2020

Indigenous Peoples and Human Rights

Saturday, October 17, 2020

Trump Jr. and Navajo Vice President Super Spreader Virus Event Endangered High-Risk Native Elderly and Children

 

Donald Trump Jr. arrived without a mask and was welcomed by Navajo Vice President Myron Lizer, in Williams, Arizona, on Thursday, after the coronavirus spread through the Trump family and White House, endangering Native elderly, youths and children at the rally.

This weekend, Oct. 17 and 18, the Navajo Nation reported 95 new cases of COVID-19. Now, 573 Navajo have died from the virus. More than 3,500 Dine' have the virus who have not recovered.


Photo: Trump Jr. gives Navajo President Lizer a hug in Williams on Thursday, after the coronavirus spread through the Trump family and White House. Photo: Arizona Daily Sun, Flagstaff.


Trump Jr. and Navajo Vice President's Virus Super Speader near Flagstaff endangered high-risk Native elderly and children

By Brenda Norrell
Censored News

WILLIAMS, Arizona -- Navajo Vice President Myron Lizer and Donald Trump Jr. ignored the coronavirus spreading through the Trump family and White House staff at a rally on Thursday and endangered high-risk Native elderly and children. Trump Jr. was among those not wearing masks.

While promoting Trump, Navajo Vice President Lizer ignored President Trump's promotion of racism and racial violence, attacks on tribal sovereignty, persistent threat to human rights, caging of Indigenous migrant children, destruction of Native burial places for the border wall, and Trump's disregard for the spread of the coronavirus which has caused the deaths of 571 Navajos.

Vice President Lizer introduced Trump Jr. at the super spreader event at the rodeo grounds.



Arriving in Williams, Arizona, Donald Trump Jr. was among
those not wearing a mask and endangering Native elderly and children.


The super spreader event comes as the coronavirus spiked in the Four Corners region.

All this week, New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham warned of extreme danger from "uncontrollable virus spread." The State of Colorado posted a long list of schools and grocery stores with virus outbreaks, and an Arizona family lost 8 members due to the virus. On Friday night, one of the largest hospitals in Salt Lake City, Utah, said it was out of ICU beds because of the rapid spread of the virus.

Meanwhile, while the Navajo Vice President rallied at the super spreader virus event, the Office of the Navajo President and Vice President continued a media campaign telling Navajos to stay home and lockdown -- even though there is no home delivery of food and water to desperate Dine'.

Although the Navajo Nation is under mandatory lockdown this week, there is no uniform delivery of food and water to the sick and desperate. This includes Dine' elderly, people too sick to care for themselves, families with young children with no transportation, and those with the virus sent home by hospitals and told to quarantine.

The highly-publicized giveaways of donated items by the Navajo President's office resulted in the false perception by the public that the most desperate Dine' are receiving help.

Although the Navajo Nation received $714 million in federal virus emergency relief more than four months ago from the CARES Act, the funds have not been distributed to Dine' in need. There are 300,000 Navajos living in 110 chapters. 

The coronavirus spread through the Trump family and the White House during October. President Trump, First Lady Melania Trump, and their son Barron all tested positive for coronavirus.

President Trump plans a campaign rally in Prescott, Arizona, on Monday and to stop at the Tucson International Airport at 3 p.m. today, Monday.

(Photo below) This event at the White House on Sept. 26 resulted in the spread of the coronavirus through the Trump family and White House. Article

AIM West online International Film Festival extended through Oct. 22, 2020






Watch films at Roxie Virtual Cinema:

https://www.roxie.com/

Indigenous Self-Determination in The Time of COVID-19

Co-Presented by and proceeds to benefit the Oakland Intertribal Friendship House!

In honor of Indigenous Peoples Day and the 50th Anniversary of the occupation of Alcatraz, A.I.M. West presents two new and extraordinary feature films and a program of shorts, all of which revolve around the theme of Indigenous Self-Determination in The Time of the COVID-19 Pandemic.

GATHER

“Critic’s Pick… The film wonderfully weaves personal stories with archival footage that contextualizes the continued violence against Native Americans.”- NY Times.


Gather is an intimate portrait of the growing movement amongst Native Americans to reclaim their spiritual, political and cultural identities through food sovereignty, while battling the trauma of centuries of genocide.

Gather follows Nephi Craig, a chef from the White Mountain Apache Nation (Arizona), opening an indigenous café as a nutritional recovery clinic; Elsie Dubray, a young scientist from the Cheyenne River Sioux Nation (South Dakota), conducting landmark studies on bison; and the Ancestral Guard, a group of environmental activists from the Yurok Nation (Northern California), trying to save the Klamath river.

Lummi Nation pulls out of AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine experiment

Photo by AIANTA

Coronavirus vaccine trials halted as more volunteers become ill, Lummi Nation withdraws from AstraZeneca experiments


By Brenda Norrell
Censored News

LUMMI NATION, Washington -- The Lummi Nation pulled out of the controversial AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine study this week, after a volunteer in the trial became ill with a neurological disorder.

Lawrence Solomon, Chairman of the Lummi Indian Business Council said, “We will continue to look for ways to protect our people from this virus. But after consultation with the Lummi Public Health Department, it was clear that the AstraZeneca vaccine trial was not a good fit.”