August 2020

Indigenous Peoples and Human Rights

Monday, May 17, 2021

Pronghorns on the bombing range: Targeted assassinations in a world where leaders mumble



The Reckless Disregard for Life

By Brenda Norrell 
Censored News

My mind is on the pronghorns in the Sonoran Desert, west of the Tohono O'odham Nation, and the drones used for targeted assassinations.

The last time I visited the center designed to protect the pronghorns, the staff told me they went out to the Goldwater Bombing Range to take the small pronghorn herd food and water.

"Are the pronghorns being bombed?" I asked, shocked. Their answers were mumbled. The small herd of endangered Sonoran Pronghorn struggled to make their way across the border during their annual migrations.

Today, a border wall violating all natural laws has been built. And worse, the bombing does continue. The pristine desert here, and in northern Nevada, are testing grounds for the U.S. drones used in targeted assassinations and kill flights. Jet fighters pierce the air in their war games.

Today, on the other side of our world, bombs fall on Palestine -- and the world leaders mumble.

Palestinian children are killed in the reckless act of war. They are locked in the prison by border walls. One of those responsible for both the Palestinian wall, and manufacturing drones for killing civilians, is Elbit Systems of Israel.

Today Elbit is at work on the Tohono O'odham Nation constructing spy towers, integrated fixed towers, for surveillance by the U.S. Border Patrol. Border Patrol agents can now stalk traditional O'odham using Israeli technology.

What has become of the pronghorns?

What will become of a world where Palestinian children are killed with reckless impunity?



Photo by Brenda Norrell


Censored News 2007: Pronghorns on the Bombing Range

The Sonoran Pronghorn can run 60 miles per hour, but can it outrun an out-of-control Bush Administration building border walls

By Brenda Norrell
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com/

AJO, Arizona (2007) – The Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge visitor center looks like a typical national park office from the outside. Inside, however, the mysteries unfold of the Sonoran Desert, the endangered Sonoran pronghorn and the delicate complexion of the desert ecosystem.