Saturday, October 31, 2009

MNN: Consensual Decision Making Process

CONSENSUAL DECISION MAKING PROCESS

Mohawk Nation News
http://www.mohawknationnews.com

MNN. Oct. 31, 2009. The meetings in Kahnawake to set up a justice system are supposedly based on the decision making process of the Rotino’shonni:onwe. [Wampums 5 to 11, Kaianereh’ko:wa]. Our ancestors brought rational thinking to a principle. To keep our identity, we have to be free in body, mind and energy. We have to make up our own mind based on all the facts. There are many similarities in the nature based philosophies of all Ongwehonwe on Onowaregeh [Great Turtle Island] and beyond. These are the basic principles of our decision making process.

GOAL. The decision must be in the best interests of all the people. Consensus does not mean that all agree but that all understand the decision.

NOTE. Whatever ideas are put into the process, the needs and attitudes of each is considered and complements the decision. The individual has a duty to be directly involved, and to bring their ideas into the discussion within their clan. The final decision will be fully satisfactory to some, satisfactory to others and relatively satisfactory to the remainder, and will reflect elements from each group. This is a slow careful process requiring the reaching of a full understanding by each individual and not a decision made by a leader.

WAR CHIEF. Presides over the meeting to make sure that collective rational thought and behavior are followed.

CLANS. The people are divided into three clans: Bear, Wolf and Turtle. Each have 3 chiefs for a total of 9.

ASSISTANT WAR CHIEF. Each clan selects a temporary spokesperson called an Assistant War Chief.

WELL-KEEPER announces the subject for discussion and passes the issue over the Council Fire.

The three clans deliberate.

Then the Assistant War Chief either reports or asks questions or reports a final decision. If the Clans disagree or there is an error or the proceedings are irregular, the Assistant War Chief calls attention to it on behalf of his clan. They once again deliberate.

The issue is then passed by all three clans.

THREE CRITERIA.

When an issue is discussed, the clans consider the short term and long term pros and cons of the issue. Three criteria must be met:

1.PEACE. Does it preserve the peace that is already established?

2.RIGHTEOUSNESS. Is it morally correct? And

3.POWER. Does it preserve the integrity of the nation? What does it do for the present and how does it affect the future seven generations from now?

DURING DELIBERATIONS.
Each must follow the criteria of peace, righteousness and power at all times. Persons are asked throughout the process if they fully understand. If not, the process stops until this is accomplished. One cannot simply be stubborn and refuse to understand as they will be questioned.

Every Person has a responsibility to expand and exercise their minds. The forces of life have given the human being the potential to use the mind to create a better life through peace, power and righteousness.

In the decision-making process:

-all opinions have to be considered;

-all must be completely reasonable;

-all should come with an open mind;

-all must fully understand the other’s viewpoint;

-each participant cannot repeat a position once it has been fully explained and understood;

-if a person does not agree with the views that have been stated, they must fully explain their dissenting views;

-no one can impose their will nor make decisions for another;

-all must understand the viewpoint and agree of their own free will; and

-if there is no consensus, the consensus is to retain the status quo.

The Chiefs and the War Chief who preside over the meeting make sure that the Kaianereh’ko:wa and collective rational thought and behavior are followed.

All human beings are capable of rational thought, which leads to solving even the most difficult problem. The underlying philosophy is that human beings are loving, caring and wish to interact in a positive way. People cannot think clearly when they are in psychological plain, or have feelings of rage or lose hope. The process must bring us from despair to hope. We have to resist being manipulated or having decisions made for us or pacifying us. We all have a responsibility to develop our minds. To think is to create a sane world for the present and future generations, a world safe from the emotional, irrational behavior controlled by fear, hatred, greed, jealousy, suspicion and conflict. The main obstacle to our survival is fear.

We are a distinct nation with our own law, government, people and territory. We have to always assert this.

Kahentinetha MNN Mohawk Nation News, www.mohawknationnews.com kahentinetha2@yahoo.com Note: Your financial help is needed and appreciated. Please send your donations by check or money order to “MNN Mohawk Nation News”, Box 991, Kahnawake [Quebec, Canada] J0L 1B0. Or go to PayPal on MNN website. Nia:wen thank you very much. Go to MNN BORDER category for more stories; New MNN Books Available now!

For more details: Horn, Kahentinetha. The Confusion Between the Great Law and the Handsome Lake Code. Mohawk Issues for Dummies Series. #2. The Longhouse Conflict in Iroquois Communities. MNN Mohawk Nation News. 2007. $20.
Hall, Karonhiaktajeh. Gayanerekowa. The Great Law of Peace As Brought to the Confederacy of the Iroquois By Dekanawida the Peacemaker. Ohontsa. 1993. $20. 6 hour video available. Book & video. $80.

More than 200 bodies recovered at Arizona/Sonora border

October 30, 2009
Contact: Kat Rodriguez: 520.770.1373

Total of Recovered Remains on the Arizona-Sonora Border Reaches 206 despite continued claims of Border Enforcement Success
By Kat Rodrigquez, Derechos Humanos
Photo by Brenda Norrell (Walkers arrive at San Xavier on Tohono O'odham land Oct. 31, 2009, with crosses in memory of the migrants who died in the Sonoran Desert.)

Arizona -- The final number of bodies recovered on the Arizona-Sonora border for the fiscal year that began on October 1, 2008 and ended September 30, 2009 is 206, reports Coalición de Derechos Humanos. The data, which are compiled from medical examiner reports from Pima, Yuma, and Cochise counties, are an attempt to give a more accurate reflection of the human cost of failed U.S. border and immigration policies. The final count includes 141 males, 33 females, 5 minors, and approximately 99, or 48% of unknown identity. Countries represented in the final count include México, Guatemala, and Ecuador.
This figure is higher than last year's total of 183 remains recovered, but the true total number of deaths on the border is impossible to calculate, particularly as the number of remains recovered in neighboring states is not available.
"In looking at the data from this year, an alarming piece that jumps out immediately is the staggering increase in the number of remains of unknown gender. Two years ago, that number was 5, then 19 last year, and this year we are at 31, an incredible 15% of the total recovered." says Kat Rodriguez, Coordinator of Coalición de Derechos Humanos.
Unknown gender indicates that not enough of the remains were recovered to determine gender, and without DNA, it is impossible to know even this basic information about the individual, making identification and return to their families even more difficult. The dramatic increase in these unknown gender cases are a troubling indicator or what might be to come, as people are pushed out into more and more isolated areas, making rescue and detection less likely, and the likelihood of death more certain.
There is information to suggest that the migration flow patterns are shifting due to the Funnel Effect, which has been documented by the Binational Migration Institute*. The high number of skeletal remains recovered this year, 36 (17.5% of total) support this likely shift in migration flow, and it is possible that the long periods of time before being recovered indicates that people are crossing in more isolated and desolate areas, with less chance of rescue or discovery. It is unknown how many remains are currently near the border but have not yet been discovered, and it is possible that some of these remains will never be recovered.
"Every year we total up the human cost of militarization and wonder when our government will acknowledge that these deaths are the direct effects of border militarization and immigration policies." continued Rodriguez. "As we watch politicians and many of the large immigrant rights groups negotiate on what they deem viable politically in discussions around immigration reform, we call on all people of conscience to denounce policies of militarization and enforcement.
"We must not waver in our opposition to any reform that will continue to militarize our communities. Doing so is not only being untrue to our commitment to human rights and dignity, but an affront to the thousands of men, women and children who have died on our borders, and the families who suffer the agony of their deaths or the bitter anguish of never knowing what has become of their loved ones."
The complete list of recovered bodies is available on the Coalición de Derechos Humanos website: http://www.derechoshumanosaz.net/ This information is available to anyone who requests it from us and is used by our organization to further raise awareness of the human rights crisis we are facing on our borders.

* The complete BMI study, The "Funnel Effect" & Recovered Bodies of Unauthorized Migrants Processed by the Pima County Office of the Medical Examiner, 1990-2005, is available on the Derechos Humanos website: http://www.derechoshumanosaz.net/images/pdfs/bmi%20report.pdf
Coalición de Derechos Humanos
P.O. Box 1286 Tucson, AZ 85702
Tel: 520.770.1373 520.770.1373
Fax: 520.770.7455
http://www.derechoshumanosaz.net/

Flagstaff 'Outta Your Backpack' grand opening concert

Taala Hooghan Infoshop/Outta Your Backpack Media
Grand Opening of New Location! Sunday, Nov. 1st
Photo: Fence on Black Mesa
The event is also a benefit for Black Mesa Indigenous Support (http://www.blackmesais.org/)
Free open house and veggie BBQ at 3PM
Show starts at 6PM, $3-6 sliding scale donation, all ages
At 11 S. Mikes Pike in Downtown Flagstaff (In the white warehouse near the south side bus transfer station)
With performances by:
Broadcast Live (Hip Hop indie rock from New York)
Radmilla Cody (Traditional Dine' vocalist)
Evan Greer (Folk/punk from Massachusetts)
Discotays (Awesomeness from New Mexico)
Shining Soul (Hip Hop from Phoenix)
Capoeira workshop/demo
Outta Your Backpack Media short films
Speakers and various issues and more!
We also have a new website! Check it out and visit often as its a work in progress!
http://www.taalahooghan.org/
We still need volunteers & donations! Volunteer meetings every Friday at 6:30PM at Mikes Pike location. Heres some goods were looking for right now: Kitchen towels; folding chairs; folding tables; large garbage & recycling cans/ cleaning supplies (rags,etc;) electric stove and exhaust fan; large storage shelves
From Flaglive: Grassroots Groundswell
The Táala Hooghan Infoshop has created a vibrant arts and music-oriented community in the two years of its existence. With regular free markets to live concerts and encouraging independent media and film projects among youth, the Infoshop has its hands full. So they’ve moved into a bigger space downtown south of the tracks and are having a party to celebrate, which will double as a benefit for Black Mesa Indigenous Support. There will be live music by Broadcast Live, Evan Greer, Radmilla Cody, Discotays and Shining Soul. Also show up for a capoeira demo and workshop as well as speakers and food. 11 S. Mikes Pike. Open house at 3 p.m. Show at 6 p.m.www.myspace.com/taalahooghan. infoshop@gmail.com
Taala Hooghan - Infoshop & Youth Media Arts Center
www.myspace.com/taalahooghan

Leonard Peltier's artwork at Berkeley

La Peña Cultural Center and Polu Manu Productions proudly presents:
The artwork of Native American political prisoner Leonard Peltier


The highly-praised artwork of Native American activist, political prisoner and six time Nobel Peace Prize nominee, Leonard Peltier - curated by Bird Levy Strain of Polu Manu Productions, SF - will be exhibited in Berkeley's La Peña theater from October 19 until November 30, 2009.

The exhibit can be viewed either during show times (with admission ticket only) or by appointment; call 510-849-2568 510-849-2568. Opening Reception Date: Friday, Nov. 13. 6:30 - 8pm

Navajo activist Chelsea Chee wins young activist award

For details, contact:
Lynne Hollander Savio707-823-7293
Mobile:
707-703-9829savio@sonic.net
http://www.savio.org (Photo Chelsea Chee)
ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE ACTIVISTS WIN MARIO SAVIO YOUNG ACTIVIST AWARDS

Two young leaders who have been tackling the problems of climate change and environmental justice in different but complementary ways have been awarded this year's Mario Savio Young Activist Award. Each will receive $6,000, half for their projects and half to use as they wish.
Chelsea Chee, a 25-year old Navajo woman, Youth Organizer for the Black Mesa Water Coalition in Arizona, has been working to engage Indigenous youth of the Southwest in implementing climate change solutions. Through Chelsea’s leadership young Indigenous peoples are actively reorienting their tribal governments, schools, and communities towards a "greener' future. This means opposing fossil fuel extraction, encouraging sustainable living, and promoting a green job opportunities. Her efforts have resulted in the creation of numerous Indigenous youth groups throughout the rural Southwest and the passage of the Navajo Nation Green Economy legislation.
Timothy DenHerder-Thomas, 22, a senior at Macalester College in Minnesota, has devised practical new programs that focus on organizing for ecological innovation and sustainable community development. After establishing a revolving fund that helps students implement campus sustainability practices and recaptures the savings created (now over $100,000), Timothy has gone on to organize Summer of Solutions, a program that trains youth leaders to partner with local groups in developing community projects around energy efficiency, sustainable food production and urban design, and green industry.
"Chelsea and Timothy strike us as representing two key aspects of the climate debate--the need for those communities most vulnerable to the effects of climate change, though least responsible for it, to have a strong voice in the debate and the need to build bridges across class divides and challenge the system from within," stated Lynne Hollander Savio, Chairperson of the awards program. "Chelsea has had to struggle against great odds -- a vast territory, little money, and tribal history and cultural values, while Timothy has been exceptionally creative and ingenious in developing new, self-sustaining projects."
The awards for leadership ability, creativity, and integrity, were presented last night at the 13th annual Mario Savio Memorial Lecture, delivered this year by journalist Naomi Klein at the University of California Berkeley campus. Both the Lecture and the Young Activist Award, which is given to a young person with a deep commitment to human rights and social justice and a proven ability to transform this commitment into effective action, honor the late Mario Savio, who came to public notice in 1964 when students at Berkeley rebelled against restrictions on political activity at the University. Their protest drew nationwide attention and stirred activism by college students across the country. Savio's words to his fellow students sparked a non-violent sit-in and the arrest of over 800 protestors, the largest mass arrest in U.S. history up till that time. They have also been quoted frequently in movies and recordings.
` "There comes a time," he said, "when the operation of the machine becomes so odious, makes you so sick at heart, that you can't take part, you can't even passively take part, and you've got to put your bodies upon the gears and upon the wheels, upon all the apparatus, and you've got to make it stop. And you've got to indicate to the people who run it, the people who own it, that unless you're free the machine will be prevented from working at all."
Although condemned by University administrators and public opinion at the time,
the Free Speech Movement has been recognized for some years as having made a positive contribution to university life. On Savio's death, a plaque was installed naming the steps of Sproul Hall where he made his speeches as the Mario Savio Steps. The Free Speech Movement café, commemorating the protest, was opened in the undergraduate library in 1998 and has become a popular campus gathering place. The yearly lecture series which bears his name is co-sponsored by several departments at the university, and has presented such well-known speakers as journalist Molly Ivins, teacher and author Cornel West, and historian Howard Zinn.
For more information, contact Lynne Hollander Savio, savio@sonic.net, 707-823-7293 or 707-703-9829.

Friday, October 30, 2009

MNN: Polish death probed -- attempt on Mohawk ignored

POLISH DEATH PROBED – ATTEMPT ON MOHAWK IGNORED
Mohawk Nation News
http://www.mohawknationnews.com/

MNN. Oct. 29, 2009. On October 14th 2007, Polish immigrant, Robert Dziekanski, was killed by the RCMP at the customs venue in Vancouver Airport. He was tasered, knocked down and hit again. He screamed in pain on the floor. They fired again, again and again until he died.

Dziekanski had come from Poland to visit his mother, who had been waiting for him at the arrivals level for 7 hours.

A bystander video taped his death with his cell phone. The RCMP were all buffed up with body armor, hand guns, pepper spray and collapsible batons. They said they feared for their safety when he picked up the stapler and waved it at them.

The state is spending millions on an highly publicized investigation into his death.

What’s the difference between this and the attack on Kahentinetha Horn at the Akwesasne border on June 14, 2009? The CBSA Canadian Border Services Agency video taped this vicious assault which they hide for reasons of National Security. Many witnesses have signed affidavits.

Horn was pulled over by the border guards to wait for hours. CBSA and a squad of heavily equipped commandos appeared. They surrounded her car, grabbed her and used stress tactics that brought on a heart attack. The border guards tried to push her to bend forward so the blood would rush into her heart and kill her. She survived.

This attack has been kept out of mainstream news. Every request to the RCMP, OPP and Attorney General of Canada to investigate this crime has been stopped.
Canada does not want a review of their agents torturing and trying to kill a 69 year old woman who was peacefully crossing the border at Akwesasne.

Horn went to the Federal Court of Canada to file an action to investigate this crime. FCC issued an order that she must pay for all of the Crown’s costs starting with a $20,000 deposit. They declared she lives in the Mohawk community of Kahnawake and therefore is not a resident of Canada. This is an admission that we are sovereign.

Many have been brutalized at this border. The colonial Akwesasne Mohawk Council is hiring a high profile lawyer, paid by Canada, to mount a class action suit against Canada, mainly to avoid the sovereignty, international border and land issues. Indigenous victims will be urged to take a settlement. The deal will probably try to absolve Canada of guilt and responsibility in the eyes of their law.

Canada knows this is an international nation-to-nation issue. The lawyer will say the ruling is a great victory for the Indigenous, blah, blah, blah. Canada will keep pretending they are in control of their Indians.

The foreigners need guns to assert their illegitimate authority.

In Akwesasne we are in our homes, doing nothing wrong. When some antagonistic armed border goon confronts us, our guard goes up. An issue is created and we could be killed. Armed camps are being created around us to force us to defend ourselves against their brutality and weapons. Since they have guns, shouldn’t we have guns to defend ourselves from them?

Any law abiding peaceful and compliant individual, black, white, yellow or brown, who shows up at the border is confronted with tasers and guns. They can become a victim, attacked and killed. Because it’s at the border the goons think they can walk away scot free with no fear of retaliation.

Is Canada at war with us? Why are they pointing us at us? The corporations, Wall Street, bankers, military and lawyers now control governments. Anyone asserting self-determination and sovereignty or questioning their lack of jurisdiction in a resource rich territory is considered an enemy. We have been declared terrorists or enemy combatants and denied civil, sovereign and human rights.

Dziekanski was a visitor with more rights to an investigation than us. He was killed to desensitize the public to what state agents will do to enforce their will. The RCMP took 7 hours to plan his killing and to work up the nerve to do it. In the Horn case, they spent over an hour and botched it.

Kahentinetha MNN Mohawk Nation News, www.mohawknationnews.com kahentinetha2@yahoo.com Note: Your financial help is needed and appreciated. Please send your donations by check or money order to “MNN Mohawk Nation News”, Box 991, Kahnawake [Quebec, Canada] J0L 1B0. Or go to PayPal on MNN website. Nia:wen thank you very much. Go to MNN BORDER category for more stories; New MNN Books Available now!

NOTE: Charges could not be brought against the CBSA border guards unless the victims paid the crown’s court costs. Federal Court of Canada Prothonotary Mireille Tabib made an order on October 23, 2008 that Mohawks residing in Akwesasne and Kahnawake are not residents of Canada. Two supporting FCC orders were made by Judge Francois Lemieux on January 29, 2009; and Claude Morissette on March 16, 2009. FCA T-1309-08 and T-288-09.

Wednesday, October 28, 2009

Listen: Uranium Forum Defending Mother Earth


Censored News Blog Radio

During the 7th Southwest Indigenous Uranium Forum, Faith Gemmill describes how mining is destroying the lands of the Gwich'in in Alaska. Charmaine White Face, Oglala coordinator of Defenders of the Black Hills, reveals the secrecy behind uranium mining in the Plains. Chris Peters of the 7th Generation Fund provides an overview of the assualt of uranium mining in Indian country. Earl Tulley, Navajo, speaks on defending Dinetah, Navajoland.
Listen at:
Photo: Charmaine White Face, Oglala, Defenders of the Black Hills
Radio stations anywhere in the world may rebroadcast in whole or part for news.

Southwest Weekend to End Torture

SOUTHWEST WEEKEND OF WITNESS TO END TORTURE, NOVEMBER 14-15, 2009
SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
Photos: Fort Huachuca protest 2004/Indymedia

Protest at Fort Huachuca, where the US army produces torture manuals

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 14
1--4 p.m. Workshop/Teach-in on Human Rights
Teach-in will be led by Prof. Randall Amster from Prescott College and Russell Crawford with NAU Peace and Justice
Held at Southside Presbyterian Church, 317 E. 23rd St., Tucson, AZ -One block south of 10th Ave and 22nd St. in Tucson, AZ
4-6:30 p.m. Sign-making and Community-building Event
Simple supper served for donation
Also held at Southside Presbyterian Church, 317 E. 23rd St., Tucson, AZ
7--8 p.m. Healing Ritual and Music
Music provided by Ted Warmbrand and Francisco Herrera
Held at Southside Presbyterian Church, 317 E. 23rd St., Tucson, AZ

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 15
Note: For those who wish, carpooling has been organized to leave from Borderlinks (620 S. 6th Ave, Tucson) at 10:15 to allow at least 90 minutes for the trip to Sierra Vista, which is 72 miles southeast of Tucson (east on I-10, then south on Hwy. 90, then east on Fry Blvd. Hwy. 90 is also called Buffalo Soldier Trail.)
Noon - 3 p.m. No to Torture Rally, followed by a Procession and Presence at the Ft. Huachuca Main Gate
Rally is at Len Roberts Park at E. Theater Dr. and N. Carmichael Ave. in Sierra Vista, AZ (from the main gate of Ft. Huachuca take Fry Blvd east to N. Canyon Dr and go north to Theater Dr.)
Speakers, musicians
Bring brown bag or picnic lunch, beverages, hat, sunscreen, folding chair, appropriate signs, and walking shoes if you will be in the procession.
The park has restrooms and some parking but carpooling is encouraged. There are fast food and cafe options all along Fry Blvd.
No to Torture Procession Note: A Vigil of Presence across from Ft. Huachuca's main gate on the east side of Buffalo Soldiers Trail and Fry Blvd. follows the park Rally. We will also have a presence at one of the private contractor's office nearby. (Please note that we are no longer allowed to be in the empty lot where vigils have taken place in past years. We will need to vigil in the sidewalk area.)
The gate is a little less than a mile from Len Roberts Park. Counter-demonstrators are expected and peacekeepers will be aiding us in our procession. We will allow a half-hour for the transition from the park to the gate. Those not walking may drive near the gate and park in the neighborhood east of the gate.

All these events are sponsored by Southwest Witness, Tucson SOA Watch, and Torture on Trial in solidarity with SOA Watch and their annual Vigil & Action at Ft. Benning, Georgia on November 20-22 (see http://soaw.org/)
More information: http://southwestwitness.org/
/ and http://tortureontrial.org/

or 520-820-7784

Plastering the hole in journalism

By Brenda Norrell
Censored News
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com/

Here's three ways that news reporters and editors fake being present at a news event:
--Publish a press release and label it with the byline "Staff writer"
--Make a phone call to someone, anyone, and publish it with a photo by someone who was there
--Plagiarize the work of reporters who were there and rewrite their work
Here's three of the many ways reporters and editors fail their readers:
--Rewrite a press release by politicians or corporations and label it "news"
--Publish an inaccurate or one-sided wire service story, then claim they have no time or money to do it right
--Censor the truth to keep their advertisers or other funders happy; Censor the truth to prevent backlash from Congressmen, other politicians and federal judges

Tuesday, October 27, 2009

Tsoodzil: Protecting the mountain of sprinkled turquoise




Thanks to John Redhouse for his history of the efforts to protect sacred Mount Taylor. This painting by Navajo artist Shonto Begay is in Redhouse's compilation, Southwest Indigenous Uranium Forum, A Reader 1987 -- 2009.

More at Censored News



John Trudell speaks on racism at Santa Barbara

INDIGENOUS SYMPOSIUM ON RACE AND RACISM @ UCSB
Censored News
The American Indian Graduate Student Alliance / American Indian Student Association of the University of California Santa Barbara, presents an
INDIGENOUS SYMPOSIUM ON RACE AND RACISM
November 13th-15th, 2009
Key Note Address by John Trudell, Lakota Activist, Writer and Musician
Following recent events surrounding the Carpenteria High School mascot vote, the UCSB Nexus Newspaper, the lack of an Indigenous/Native American Indian Studies department at UCSB and low enrollment, students are organizing this Symposium to address race and racism affecting local Indigenous communities, especially in the areas of education.
Sessions will be on racism regarding mascots, sacred sites, and education, including religious and identity persecution effecting urban and rural communities. The Symposiums goal is to bridge conversation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous, academic and traditional knowledge, and tribal nations and organizations, in addressing historic and contemporary issues and solutions facing our nations today.
Event is Free, donations of $5.00 per meal is requested.
For more information and registration, please contact:
AIGSA Facebook, or Monique Sonoquie at sonoquie@hotmail.com or (805) 403-6744

Venezuela Ambassador to meet with Alaskan Indigenous


Alaska Inter-Tribal Council is pleased to announce an opportunity for everyone to meet with the Venezuela Ambassador Bernardo Alvarez.
Photo PBS
Friday, October 30, 2009,
10 am - 12 noon
University of Alaska Anchorage
Integrated Science Building Room 120
Bernardo Alvarez, Venezuela’s ambassador to the U.S., will travel to Alaska on October 28-30, 2009 to strengthen relations with the state’s indigenous tribes and promote cultural, commercial and academic links between the U.S. and Venezuela.
During his trip to Alaska, Ambassador Alvarez will meet with elected officials, speak to students and faculty at the University of Alaska and participate in some media interviews. He will also meet with the executive leadership of the Alaska Inter-Tribal Council and speak to a number of tribal chiefs that have benefited from a discounted heating oil program sponsored by the CITGO Corporation, which is owned by Venezuela’s state oil company. Since 2007, low-income Alaskans -- primarily members of the state’s indigenous tribes – have been eligible for the program.
Ambassador Alvarez’s visit will mark his first trip to Alaska since returning to his post in June 2009. In September 2008, Ambassador Alvarez left the U.S. during a diplomatic dispute; his return earlier this year marked the first time in U.S. diplomatic history that an ambassador has been allowed to return to his post.
Since being appointed as Venezuela’s top envoy to the U.S. in 2003, Ambassador Alvarez has traveled to a number of states promoting people-to-people ties based on culture, commerce, energy and sports. Prior to serving in Washington, Ambassador Alvarez occupied a number of posts in Venezuela’s Ministry of Energy and Mines, where he focused on the country’s oil industry.

Monday, October 26, 2009

Southwest Indigenous Uranium Forum a Success


This past weekend Indigenous Peoples from Alaska, North America, Bolivia and Japan converged near Acoma Pueblo for the 7th Southwest Indigenous Uranium Forum in Sky City, New Mexico. Although the forum focused on the uranium developments being proposed at Mount Taylor and throughout the grants mineral belt of New Mexico, it also provided an opportunity for networking.

CONTACTS: Anna Rondon, 7th Indigenous Uranium Forum Organizer, 505-726-9392 505-726-9392
Nikke Alex, Black Mesa Water Coalition, 505-879-7461 505-879-7461


Southwest Indigenous Uranium Forum a Success
by Jihan Gearon
Photo by Brenda Norrell


ALBUQUERQUE – This past weekend Indigenous Peoples from Alaska, North America, Bolivia and Japan converged near Acoma Pueblo for the 7th Southwest Indigenous Uranium Forum in Sky City, New Mexico. Although the forum focused on the uranium developments being proposed at Mount Taylor and throughout the grants mineral belt of New Mexico, it also provided an opportunity for affected communities to share knowledge, experiences, and strategies to combat the current onslaught of nuclear power throughout Indigenous territories worldwide.

Over the two and a half days, participants shared knowledge about a variety of topics related to uranium mining including ongoing resistance efforts, the health affects on uranium mining, the implications of U.S. energy and climate policy, and the emerging green economy. Suzanne Singer, a young Navajo woman new to the issues of uranium mining reflected, “I have learned a lot here. This summit has been very different than other conferences I’ve been to because it brought out so much emotion in me – anger, happiness, and most importantly, inspiration.”

Michaela Stubbs traveled from Melbourne, Australia representing the Australian Nuclear Free Alliance, a network of both Indigenous and non-Indigenous people sharing skills and strategies to campaign against nuclear development in Australia. “It’s been amazing to be here, meet people and strengthen international links,” said Michaela. “The tactics used by multi-national corporations on the Indigenous Peoples here – division, bribery, and bullying – are the same tactics used in Indigenous communities in Australia. We need to find the resources to connect, support and strategize together. If we can accomplish that on the grassroots level, I believe we can shut ‘em down.”

The Indigenous Environmental Network, Honor the Earth, and the Seventh Generation Fund for Indian Development will be key strategic partners in strengthening connections between national and international communities fighting the nuclear industry. Next steps for the forum include improving communication between communities, coordinating smaller international and inter-tribal dialogues, and planning for the 8th Indigenous Uranium Forum in Australia.

Winona LaDuke, Executive Director of Honor the Earth closed the summit by restating a key theme present throughout the summit. “We need to move past being reactive to the attacks on our communities and be more proactive in creating the communities we want.” The 7th Indigenous Uranium Summit was a success in moving this important discussion forward for communities affected by the uranium and nuclear industry.

Find more information about the 7th Indigenous Uranium Forum by visiting the website at http://www.siuf.net/index.html

You can also listen to recordings from the summit at http://www.earthcycles.net/ and watch videos from the summit at http://www.livestream.com/earthcycles
(Most of the video is already available, check back for the radio audio files of the event.)

Tucson editor welcomes power plant in his backyard

Tucson editor welcomes power plant in his backyard

By Brenda Norrell
Censored News
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com/

TUCSON -- In a sudden change of heart, the editor of the Arizona Daily Starr said he would like to offer his neighborhood for the Navajo Generating Station.
After encouraging the EPA to forget about new clean air standards, he said he realized that this was an act of environmental racism. He said he realized that his desire to continue this polluting power plant on the Navajo Nation was wrong.
"I'm sorry I joined the environmental racism parade," he said. He said it had never occurred to him that Navajos were human beings and that the people who live on the land deserve to live out their lives without respiratory diseases.
Further, he said he looks forward to having the large toxic ash ponds from regional coal-fired power plants, on and around the Navajo Nation, in his backyard. He recommended the ash ponds for wading pools in Tucson city parks.
As for polluting the skies around his southern Arizona neighborhood, he said, "The haze will offer some shade. Besides, we have plenty of hospitals here to treat bronchitis and asthma."
The editor said in a show of good faith, all the radiation from the abandoned uranium mines around Monument Valley could be stockpiled in his back yard as well.
"It is time that those of us profiting from the energy produced by these disease-producing power plants take a turn at becoming sick and disabled. We look forward to sharing in the diseases caused by power plant emissions and abandoned radioactive tailings."
"Besides, how can we continue to steal the water of Arizona Indian tribes for the cities of Phoenix and Tucson without disease-producing power plants and the Central Arizona Project," he pointed out.
"To continue stealing Arizona Indian water and the electricity it produces, we need power plants, attorneys and Arizona Congressmen in our pockets."
The editor said, in any case, the pristine view of the Grand Canyon is highly over-rated.
"The canyon is far more glorious draped in a grey cloud of dark and dingy smog in the morning light. There's nothing I enjoy more than standing on the rim of the Grand Canyon and choking and coughing from a big puff of coal-fired power plant smog."
The editor encouraged the leaders of Tucson and Phoenix to offer their own backyards for nuclear and toxic dumping as well.
"In the true spirit of 'be here now' lets not worry about our future generations, or about radiation deconstructing our genetic matter." He said the Western Shoshone, Goshute and other Indian tribes shouldn't have to spend their lives fighting nuclear dumping in their communities.
"Lets put it in our backyards."
.
Yes, its satire.

Peltier 'Circle for Clemency' White House Nov. 5, 2009


UPDATE:
The only real change to the itinerary is that we will be meeting at The Elipse Grounds South (not Lafayette Park)

Group contacts are Robert Fife who may be reached in Washingon on his cell at (919)475-1343

6:00 AM
We will gather @ The Elipse grounds S.- SW quadrant @ 17th and C streets
We will set up our circle and join in Sunrise Prayers, individual prayers and socializing/greeting our Relations.

7:30 AM
Walk en masse to the Department of the Interior building (Approximately one block)

8:00 AM
Respectfully greet our tribal representatives as they arrive, welcoming them to the conference
Prayer/blessing for a successful meeting and that each of them carry in their agenda a request for clemency and Leonard's freedom.

We would ask that everyone attending in support of Leonard bring some kind of food/drink that can be shared throughout the day that we may nourish each other physically.

We would ask that everyone attending in support of Leonard carry with them their personal prayers and perhaps a personal sacred object that we may nourish each other spiritually.

We would ask that everyone attending in support of Leonard share information/conversation to educate not only our people but others who may be drawn to the event so that we may nourish each other mentally.

We anticipate several Indigenous artists/musicians, dancers, drummers and singers to be in attendance. It is hoped that they will share their gifts with The People throughout the day as the Spirit moves them.

In September, Ben Carnes and I came to Washington, DC, fasted for seven days and sent our humble, sometimes whispered prayers to The Creator that President Obama hear our pleas of clemency and justice for Leonard Peltier. We have faith that The Creator heard every word and today is our chance to take the next right step on the path that He has laid for us. In its essence, this Gathering is an opportunity to send many more humble and whispered prayers that they may become One Great Voice heard not only by The Creator but by All The Nations and all The People.

For all attending, this is a rare and beautiful opportunity to celebrate the joys of being Indigenous People and speaking the truth for our brother, Leonard Peltier.

5:30 PM
Closing prayers to bless the day, our tribal representatives and All Our Relations. These prayers shall be of solidarity, hope and gratitude that our voices have been heard and that our message of freedom for Leonard Peltier is carried in the hearts, words and deeds of our tribal representatives, President Obama and the United States government from this day forth.

MNN: How Stupid are Tribal Councils?

HOW STUPID ARE TRIBAL COUNCILS?

Mohawk Nation News
http://www.mohawknationnews.com

MNN. Oct. 25, 2009. Native Pride has asked if tribal, state and federal officials are really so stupid? MNN wonders too. US Senator Charles "Chuck" Schumer (D-NY) misinforms the public about how Indians have no right to sell our products to non-Indians and estimates that the state is losing billions? in taxes. There’s also the misinterpreted 1994 US Supreme Court ruling that New York State could illegally collect taxes without our consent. [http//:letstalknativepride.blogspot.com/ edited by MNN]

Shumer says that his people can sell to us but we can't sell to them. NYS knows they may tax purchases but can't tax our sales. NYS says the consumer is supposed to remit the tax back to them. (Form CG-15). How likely?


We are born sovereign. It’s an individual birthright. We didn’t win it in an election. It can’t be granted by foreign federal or state governments. Every business on our land is a Nation business. Every Native retailer is sovereign.


New York State Governor David Paterson allows everyone to buy up to 2 cartons of untaxed and unstamped native made cigarettes, which, we presume, can only be smoked in NYS. He allows anybody to buy 2 cartons from anywhere but but not from the Indians.


In Department of Taxation & Finance of New York et al. v. Milhelm Attea & Bros., non-native wholesaler, Attea, lost his challenge. He got his license to do business with Indians from the Bureau of Indian Affairs. He argued that it supersedes NYS law. Weak rulings in other states were used against Attea to imply somehow they beat us, but in fact they didn’t.


NYS always wants to take in billions of dollars every way they can. Any attempt to shut us down will never get a net gain for the state.


It’s not money. Control through threats and force is the end game. Shumer mentioned that many "tribes" elsewhere have entered into illegal agreements with the states. Why? The States have no rights. Otherwise why do they have to enter into compacts with us? We don’t need agreements to exercise our sovereign trade and commerce rights anywhere.


The state promises casinos to sell-out tribal leaders that will assert illegitimate authority over us, our territory and our businesses. They want to disperse our internationally recognized distinction as Rotino’shonni:onwe.


The state is legitimately powerless and has to resort to coercion. Colonial tribal officials are puppets of their masters in Ottawa, Washington and Albany. To defend ourselves from their attacks, we have shut down the Thruway, blocked bridges and stood toe to toe with the police.


Mohawk and Seneca will always resist colonial lawlessness and human rights violation. Regrettably many tribal puppets are forced to enter into illegal compacts because they know we have a right to maintain a strong private sector economy. These tribal councils help the state to arrest, criminalize and extort huge fines against almost half of our youth.


The Mohawk and Seneca don’t have any legal tax compacts with any foreigners. We never gave our consent to anyone to sell us out. NYS can only use state criminality and force on us. Are these tribal puppets so stupid as to not know what they are doing is wrong? So Senator Shumer and Governor David Paterson, why don’t you stop your colonial racist nonsense! [See www.letstalknativepride.blogspot.com
for original article.]

Kahentinetha MNN Mohawk Nation News, www.mohawknationnews.com kahentinetha2@yahoo.com Note: Your financial help is needed and appreciated. Please send your donations by check or money order to “MNN Mohawk Nation News”, Box 991, Kahnawake [Quebec, Canada] J0L 1B0. Or go to PayPal on MNN website. Nia:wen thank you very much. Go to MNN AKWESASNE category for more stories; New MNN Books Available now!

Faking the News: Where were the reporters?


By Brenda Norrell
Censored News
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com/

SKY CITY, Acoma Pueblo, N.M. -- Where were the news reporters during the 7th Southwest Uranium Forum? Only two people identified themselves as news reporters at the gathering, a correspondent for Washington Post and another from the Four Corners Free Press.

Where was the American Indian media? Where were the Native American newspapers and radio stations?

Recently, Associated Press and the Arizona Republic were quick to attack environmentalists by rewriting the press releases of politicians and corporations. But where were their reporters when Indigenous Peoples gathered to tell their stories of how uranium mining, and the radioactive waste strewn and left behind, caused the deaths of their children, parents, brothers and sisters?

Faith Gemmill came all the way from the Arctic Circle in Alaska to this gathering, telling of the climate change devastating the way of life of her people and the land, water and air of all life there. Charmaine White Face of Defenders of the Black Hills came from South Dakota, revealing the secrecy of the uranium mining and the waste that poisons the land and water of the Oglala. Winona LaDuke, Anishinabe, came from White Earth, Louise Benally, Navajo, came from Big Mountain, Margene Bullcreek, Goshute, came from Utah and Supai Waters from the land of the Havasupai.

This Indigenous Uranium Forum was broadcast live with streaming video by Earthcycles. As of Monday morning, there were more than 68,500 views of the sessions from Thursday, Friday and Saturday. News reporters have access to these sessions at no cost. Will they tell the story of the Navajos who buried their children after they died of brain tumors, or the children who grew up without their mothers who died of lung cancer from the uranium mines in Monument Valley, Red Valley and Cove, Arizona?

Will they tell the story of the children taken away, vanished from their families, after their parents died working in the uranium mines without protective clothing? Will they tell the story of the Acoma and Laguna Pueblos who ate the radioactive dust with their meals near Jackpile Mine? Will they tell the story of the Havasupai who now must sacrifice their own money to fight the new threat of uranium mining in the Grand Canyon, uranium mining that could poison their water? Will they expose how Cyprus Tohono Corporation's copper mining released uranium into the Tohono O'odham water supply and there is now a cancer alley.

Will they listen to John Redhouse, Navajo, tell of the hate crimes toward Navajos and Pueblos here. Will the news reporters reflect and consider that uranium mining has long been a hate crime in Indian country?

Sky City on Acoma Pueblo is located between the Navajo Nation and Albuquerque. It is alongside the interstate highway, but no local reporters came. If they did, they did not identify themselves at the beginning or the conclusion of the gathering.

Censorship is the sad state of the media today. Faking news coverage is what the media does when reporters are lazy and editors do not send reporters to hear the stories of the grassroots people.

It is far easier for editors and reporters to rewrite the press releases of corporations and politicians than to go and listen to the truth and the voices of the people. A quick phone call will not do justice to the long standing genocide, greed and destruction by energy companies and the US government in Indian country.

This was an opportunity missed for the media who did not make it a priority. Please write the reporters and editors and hold them accountable.

Indigenous Uranium Forum session videos:
http://www.livestream.com/earthcycles

Brenda Norrell is a contributor to Narco News, CounterPunch, Americas, Sri Lanka Guardian, Atlantic Free Press and the UN OBSERVER & International Report.
.
Comment
Tiokasin Ghosthorse
Oyate Tokaheya Wicakiye
FIRST VOICES INDIGENOUS RADIO, New York
Comment published with permission
"Faking the News: Where were the reporters?":
"Yes!! the "mainstream" Native American radio stations that are too afraid to bite the hand that feeds them and who can really afford to be there should have been there.
Those of us who want to be and do not have a budget because of the easily accepted Native "American" or America's Indian mentality to not rock the boat. These are the "indians" who America pays attention to rather than the real story. I wish I could have been there. I really do. If there was a travel account for me to go to these events across country without being taking from my personal expenses. I have been "volunteering" for 17 years on the radio.
I will download and use on several radio stations with your permission.
Thank you for doing this."
Listen to First Voices Indigenous Radio, Thursdays 10am-11am
http://www.firstvoicesindigenousradio.org/ CRAZY HORSE (His Horse Is Enchanted) 1877 said this smoking a pipe with Sitting Bull 4 days before his assassination. "Upon suffering beyond suffering: the Red Nation shall rise again and it shall be a blessing for a sick world. A world filled with broken promises, selfishness and separations. A world longing for light again. I see a time of Seven Generations when all the colors of mankind will gather under the Sacred Tree of Life and the whole Earth will become one circle again. In that day, there will be those among the Lakota who will carry knowledge and understanding of unity among all living things and the young white ones will come to those of my people and ask for this wisdom. I salute the light within your eyes where the whole Universe dwells. For when you are at that center within you and I am that place within me, we shall be one."
COMMENT AT NARCO NEWS
Submitted October 27, 2009 - 11:38 am by Tonya Hennessey
Hi Brenda,
I'm a Fieldhand; this is my first post over here. The organization I work with, CorpWatch, recently ran a feature written by a journalist in India on this same topic -- the hate crime that is uranium mining, and again, on tribal lands. When the most recent hearing was held on mine expansion, Indigenous voices were locked out.
You can find the article here, http://www.corpwatch.org/article.php?id=15450
Uranium Corporation of India Limited: Wasting Away Tribal Lands
by Moushumi Basu, Special to CorpWatch October 7th, 2009
Saludos,
Tonya
.
NOTE: Yes, permission is given from Govinda at Earthcycles and Brenda at Censored News Blog Radio to radio stations around the world, to rebroadcast our audio recordings, in whole or part in news programs.

Sunday, October 25, 2009

MNN: Hail Mary Pass by James (Moon Bat) O'Reilley

HAIL MARY PASS BY JAMES [MOON BAT] OREILLEY
Mohawk Nation News

http://www.mohawknationnews.com/

(PHOTO: Kahentinetha after she was beaten by border guards. She suffered a heart attack when border agents put her in a stresshold and attempted to murder her in 2006.)


MNN. Oct. 25, 2009. A Hail Mary pass is when a long ball in football is thrown down the field towards the offence’s goal line. It’s a last ditch hysterical attempt [by the federal Mud Dogs] to beat the invincible Ongwehone Eagles. Time has run out for the mud dogs to stop their losses. They are desperate to win. If this pass is completed, they can go on to score the winning goal. Hey, Mud Dogs, it’s hopeless. Give it up! You ain’t goin’ nowhere with it!!

Montreal ambulance chaser, James Moon-Bat Oreilley, wanted my files. He was looking for my defense strategies on the Federal Court of Canada border case. Sometime in the ethereal future, Canada is going to try to carry out their plot to remove me from the earth. This comes on the heels of events where Mohawks and other Indigenous nations are asserting sovereignty, which MNN posts truthfully.

Last week my friend, a lawyer in Montreal, phoned me. He had been helping us in the FCC case to charge the border agents who almost killed me at Kawenoke of Akwesasne on June 14, 2008.

My friend received a call from James OReilley who wanted all my files to be SENT over to him and that I had given my permission. It’s a lie!

What’s odd here is that my case is against the CBSA [Canadian Border Services Agency] who are represented by James Oreilley. He is on retainer with Akwesasne Mohawk Council and Akwesasne Mohawk Police, my adversaries in this case.

My friend found this odd that OReilley would give him the impression that he was taking over my case. I told him OReilley had never called me nor had I given permission for my files to be sent to him.

My friend found this strange. I took this to mean highly questionable behavior. We are now forced to ask the Quebec Bar if they condone this kind of behavior of their lawyers who are in a conflict of interest. Can he represent my opponents and request my files without my knowledge or permission while falsely stating they have my permission?

As far as I know the Federal Court of Canada is not going ahead with this case because I can’t afford it. They initially ordered me to put $20,000 on deposit as a retainer to cover the crown’s costs. They’ve declared that because I live in Kahnawake I am not a resident of Canada. I must pay ALL court costs as a foreigner, which they told me is mandated in Canadian law.

We can only speculate that there is a plan in motion to get me into custody to kill me. Despite the squad of commandos brought in that day, the CBSA botched the hit. Since then they needed to keep their claws hooked into my flesh. So they drummed up bogus charges so they could drag me back into custody to finish the job. That’s why these unknown charges have been filed.

I have no outstanding charges, warrants or citations that I know of. My friend thought they were looking for something on me. He felt that it may have to do with a rumor that the Akwesasne Mohawk Police charged me on behalf of CBSA, who are the main ones gunning for me. I think they want to charge me with failing to die.

It appears they want to know what kind of defense I’ve mounted for the eventual exercising of these phony charges. We hear a posse of their agents wanna com git me one of these days.

My understanding is there is a process involved when someone is held hostage by the authorities. First the arresting officers can decide to release the suspect on their own recognizance. The suspect could be held over for a bail hearing and then released, or have bail conditions imposed or money posted for a promise to appear.

If bail is not granted, the suspect is held in jail until their trial date, which could be months over a period of time.

The purpose of putting me in custody would be to have me miraculously disappear once and for all, or to put MNN out of commission. Water boarding, rape, torture, humiliation, beating and psychological tactics are commonly used by law enforcement. Anthony Griffin, Harriet Nahanee and many others have died under mysterious circumstances which were never satisfactorily explained to their families.

When we exercise indigenous sovereignty this is the treatment we can expect. No one is exempt.

Oreilly’s Hail Mary pass is bound to fail. He didn’t get my files. If this plan had succeeded, they would have known everything I told my lawyer friend about it. They would use this information against me and how I will respond to their interrogation.

We know well placed police informants in Akwesane read MNN. They are in a position to provide their version of intel to their handlers. The two people with me during the attempted Murder At The Border have surreptitiously removed themselves from my company. They could provide intel on their version of events to try to provide deeper insights into how we work as a people.

Nabbing and putting me away is a real threat. Why it’s taking so long for this kangaroo court system to work is because Canada has no jurisdictional over me or my territory. According to the FCC court order, because I live in Kahnawake and am a Kanionkehaka, a separate sovereign nation, I am not a resident of the colony of Canada. Therefore, Canada has no jurisdiction over me. The attempted murder by the CBSA happened in Kawenoke which is part of sovereign Mohawk territory.

Actually, anything I have to say about this is on MNN.

Kahentinetha MNN Mohawk Nation News, www.mohawknationnews.com kahentinetha2@yahoo.com Note: Your financial help is needed and appreciated. Please send your donations by check or money order to “MNN Mohawk Nation News”, Box 991, Kahnawake [Quebec, Canada] J0L 1B0. Or go to PayPal on MNN website. Nia:wen thank you very much. Go to MNN AKWESASNE category for more stories; New MNN Books Available now!

NOTE: Two Mohawk women were brutally assaulted on June 14, 2008 at the Akwesasne border. They could not bring charges against the border guards unless they paid court costs. Prothonotary Mireille Tabib made an order on October 23, 2008 that Mohawks residing in Akwesasne and Kahnawake are not residents of Canada. Subsequent orders supporting Tabib are: Judge Francois Lemieux on January 29, 2009; and Claude Morissette on March 16, 2009. FCA T-1309-08 and T-288-09.

Censored Radio: Fighting the corporate beast in Indian Country

Censored News Blog Talk Radio
7th Southwest Indigenous Uranium Forum







By Brenda Norrell
SKY CITY, ACOMA PUEBLO, NM -- On Censored News Blog Radio, Louise Benally, Navajo from Big Mountain, speaks on Food Sovereignty and her recent visit to the Arctic, at the Indigenous Uranium Forum. Cristala Allen, Caddo, speaks on Native green jobs and non-Indians harvesting medicine plants. During an interview, Mayra Gomez from Bolivia speaks on international human rights. During the panel on Nuclear Terrorism on Indigenous Lands: Treaty and Human Rights Lens, moderator Manny Pino introduces James Zion. Zion, an attorney, speaks on, Public Lands Uranium Resistance: Grand Canyon and Beyond. Taylor McKinnon, Center for Biological Diversity, describes the assault on the Grand Canyon by new proposed uranium mining. Recorded at the Indigenous Uranium Forum, Acoma Pueblo, NM, Oct 22--24, 2009. (90 minutes)
LISTEN AT:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/Brenda-Norrell
Videos of forum at:
http://www.livestream.com/earthcycles


Read more at Censored News:
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com/

Winona LaDuke, Acoma Uranium Forum

Video of Winona LaDuke's talk at the Indigenous Uranium Forum
http://www.livestream.com/earthcycles

CLICK ON "ON DEMAND"
THEN SELECT "LIVE SHOW SAT"

Australian Aboriginal video message to Acoma uranium conference

Mitch and Margie Lynch in Alice Springs (Northern Territory of Australia) from nat wasley on Vimeo.

Friday, October 23, 2009

Women Warriors: Indigenous Uranium Forum


VIDEO STREAM/INDIGENOUS URANIUM FORUM: Watch sessions of the forum, which ended Saturday, by clicking "On Demand" for sessions at:
Watch Ofelia's interview: Click on "On-Demand" then click on the photo of the session on Thursday, the five hour tape. You can fast forward through the session by clicking on the time bar, to time 1 hour and 10 minutes into the tape for Ofelia's interview.
Tohono O'odham Ofelia Rivas and Roselyn Bates, Navajo, at the Indigenous Uranium Forum. Live music by Indige Femme. Photos Brenda Norrell

Indigenous Uranium Forum, Acoma Pueblo, LIVE VIDEO


Watch sessions of the Indigenous Uranium Forum
CLICK ON "On-Demand" to watch sessions, including Winona LaDuke's talk on Saturday.
http://www.livestream.com/earthcycles

The On-Demand shows are a little slow to load, especially the 5 hour one. Sorry about the commercial at beginning, it's a free site. Also, Lenny Foster speaks on Leonard Peltier effort at the White House, on the 5 hour tape at time: 2:33. Fast forward by clicking on time bar.

Indigenous Uranium Forum, Women and Youth Photos





Indigenous Uranium Forum, Acoma Pueblo
Shonto high school students screen their films on the devastation from uranium mining. Margene Bullcreek, Goshute, speaks out on nuclear dumping. Louise Benally, Navajo of Big Mountain with Faith Gimmell, Gwich'in from Alaska. Photos copyright Brenda Norrell
JOIN US LIVE
Indigenous Uranium Forum, Acoma Pueblo Live Video
Stream:
Earthcycles Web Radio
Forum Schedule
http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2009/10/earthcycles-live-thursday-morning.html
Thursday, October 22, 2009
7:00AM—8AM: Breakfast & Registration
8:30AM: Welcome – Honorable Chandler Sanchez, Governor of Acoma Pueblo
8:45AM: Opening Prayer – Honorable Ron Charlie, 2nd Lieutenant Governor, Acoma Pueblo
9:00AM: Introductions – Manny Pino, Acoma, Professor, “Overview of Acoma Homelands”
9:30AM: Protecting Mt. Taylor: 30 Years of Resistance
• Jon Redhouse, Advisor to SIUF
• “Honoring Diana Ortiz, Women of Acoma: Great Role Model”
• Wild Fire Singers, Taos Drum Group, “Songs for the People”
10:30AM: Break
10:45AM: Inter-Tribal Voice
12:00PM: Lunch (on your own)
1:00PM: Indigenous Nuclear Resistance Panel
• Charmaine White Face, Defenders of the Black Hills, “Impacts of uranium
development on Lakota Lands and World Health Organization Obligation to the UN”
• Rita Capitan, Eastern Navajo Diné Against Uranium Mining
• Supai Waters, Matthew Puetsoy , Carletta Tilousi, Havasupai Tribe, People of
the Blue Green Waters, Protecting Red Butte and Grandmother Canyon
• Nuclear Waste: Margene Bullcreek, Shoshone Paiute
• Indigenous Youth Voices: Nadine Padilla, Autumn Chacon, Nikke Alex & Jihan
Gearon
• Solidarity Statement: Katsumi Furitsu, Japan & Mayra Gomez, Aymara Tribe,
Bolivia
3:00PM: Break
3:15PM: Indigenous Nuclear Resistance Panel
• Gilbert Bedonie, Navajo Dependents of Uranium Workers Committee
• Chris Peters, 7th Generation Fund, “Abya Yala” International Connections
• Updates: Nuclear Regulatory Commission-GEIS Panelist Eric Jantz, NMELC
• Dineh Project, Sarah Adeky and Chris Shuey, SRIC
4:30PM: Adjourn
5:00PM: Dinner & Music by “Indigie Femme”
7:00PM—9:00PM: Evening Activities
1. Networking and relax: It’s your choice
2. Film Screenings: “U38 Womyn” (7 mins), Shonto Prepatory School, Uranium
Research, “Radioactive Mines to Radioactive Weapons” (27 mins) -- Host:
Norman Brown
Friday, October 23, 2009
7TH SOUTHWEST INDIGENOUS URANIUM FORUM ACOMA PUEBLO, NM
9:00AM: Greening Our Economies Panel
• John Fogarty, New Energy Economy
• Louise Bennally, Food Sovereignty
• Cristala Allen, Caddo, Native Workplace
10:30AM: Break
10:45AM: Nuclear Terrorism on Indigenous Lands: Treaty and Human Rights Lens –
Moderator: Manny Pino
• James Zion, Esq. “Public Lands Uranium Resistance: Grand Canyon and
Beyond”
• Taylor McKinnon, Center for Biological Diversity
12:00PM: Lunch (on your own)
1:00PM: Tools for Change – Moderator: Petuuche Gilbert, Acoma
• Multi-Cultural Alliance for a Safe Environment-Best Practice for Alliance
Building Nadine Padilla, Larry King, Jonnie Head, & Rosemarie Cechini
3:00PM: Break
3:15PM: Impact of Uranium Development on Local Communities – Moderator: Laura
Watchempino, Acoma
• Teddy Nez, Carletta Garcia, Al Waconda
4:30PM: Adjourn
5:00PM—6:30PM: Dinner
7:00PM-9:00PM: Film Screening and Discussion – Host: Robert Tohe
• “Return of Navajo Boy” (53 min) & Conversation with Elsie Mae Begay
Saturday, October 24, 2009
7:00AM—8:00AM: Breakfast & Registration
8:00AM: Opening Prayer & Announcements
9:00AM: Guest Speaker, Winona LaDuke, Anishanabe, White Earth Homelands
10:15AM: Beyond Nuclear, Kevin Kamps, Radioactive Waste Watchdog
10:30AM: Break
10:45AM: Strategy Presentations, Draft Press Release, Reach Consensus on Plans of Action,
Assignments, Committee to Carry out Plan of Action, Set Conference Call, & What
organizations are committed?
12:00PM: Wrap Up Discussion
12:30PM: Adjourn
Thank you all for taking the time to share and plan for a Nuclear Free World.

Thursday, October 22, 2009

Oglala Treaty Council Exerts Inherent Authority on BIA Agent

Black Hills Treaty Council affirmed Treaties and initiated removal proceedings of BIA Superintendent Robert Ecoffey, Jr.

MEMBER RESERVATIONS
Cheyenne River
Crow Creek
Fort Peck
Lower Brule
Pine Ridge
Rosebud
Standing Rock
Yankton
October 22, 2009

By Oglala Delegation of the Black Hills Sioux Nation Treaty Council
Censored News
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com
PINE RIDGE, S.D. -- The Oglala Delegation of the Black Hills Sioux Nation Treaty Council, headed by Chief Oliver Red Cloud, reaffirmed the 1851 and 1868 Ft. Laramie Treaties by exerting their inherent rights and authority by issuing removal proceedings against their agency's BIA Superintendent Robert Ecoffey, Jr. for human, civil, and treaty rights violations against the Oglala Oyate (people).
Article I of the Treaty states, “… If bad men among the whites, or among other people subject to the authority of the United States, shall commit any wrong upon the person or property of the Indians, the United States will … proceed at once to cause the offender to be arrested and punished … and also re-imburse the injured person for the loss sustained … If bad men among the Indians shall commit a wrong or depredation upon the person or property of any one, white, black or Indian, the Indians will deliver the wrongdoer to the United States to be tried and punished …”
Upon issuing the order for Ecoffey to vacate his position as the Pine Ridge Superintendent, two tribal members occupied Ecoffey's office in the BIA for several hours. They released a statement that they would not leave the office until the Agency was shut down and a federal negotiator would be called in to hear the complaints from tribal members regarding Ecoffey's ineffectiveness as an Agent, especially several years of questionable trust land transfers and refusal to conduct a forensic land audit.
Wednesday's non-violent action stems from months of false promises made by Ecoffey to address numerous complaints brought by firefighters from the Pine Ridge Agency Fire Department who have sought to remove Fire Management Chief Daigre Douville, Mike Twiss, Harold Compton and others from the station for human and civil rights violations and a sexual assault charge.
In a pre-emptive move to appease the tribal membership, he made a 11th hour call to the Equal Employment Office in Washington, D.C., who sent a representative to Pine Ridge yesterday to take testimony on the sexual assault charge brought against fire station staff. The E.E.O. officer was on hand to witness the Treaty Council exert their custom law on Ecoffey and assured tribal members that he would return to D.C. and summons a special commissioner to come to Pine Ridge to address the peoples' concerns.
By late afternoon, Ecoffey had granted two-week paid administrative leave to Fire Chief Daigre Douville and Fire Technician Mike Twiss, pending the outcome of the E.E.O. investigation.
The Black Hills Treaty Council contends that their action is legal under custom laws as lineal descendants of the treaty signers. Therefore, the Pine Ridge Agency is currently without a Superintendent and any action Ecoffey attempts to takes will be considered illegal.
Yesterday's events are a result of the perpetual poverty and genocidal policies that the federal government imposes on the Tribe. The Treaty Council will re-convene on November 3, 2009 at 10:00 a.m. in Billy Mills Hall, Pine Ridge to update tribal members on their progress.
Contact Alex White Plume, Treaty Council spokesman, at 605-455-2534 605-455-2534 for additional comment.

VIDEO LIVE Indigenous Uranium Forum


Streaming live again Friday morning at 9 a.m. through Saturday noon

Live Video Stream:
http://www.livestream.com/earthcycles
Earthcycles Web Radio
http://www.earthcycles.net/
Pueblos and Navajos are joined by Lakota, Goshute and Indigenous Peoples from the Americas, calling for a halt to uranium mining on Indian lands.


Forum Schedule
http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2009/10/earthcycles-live-thursday-morning.html
Photo: Supai Waters at the Indigenous Uranium Forum/Photo Brenda Norrell

Message to the Seventh Southwest Indigenous Uranium Forum
Acoma Pueblo
October 22, 2009
Good greetings relatives. Please accept our humble salutation to the gathering of the Seventh Southwest Indigenous Uranium Forum along with our best wishes for a productive and powerful gathering. Unfortunately, we are unable to attend in person but would like to extend this message of solidarity and commitment to the initiative and continuity of your efforts as a grass roots movement of Indigenous Peoples in defense of Mother Earth.
As Nican Tlacah, Indigenous Peoples of the Nahuatlacah Nations of Anahuac, Abya Yala North territories now predominantly lying within the bounds of the Republic of Mexico, it was brought to our attention some years ago the the progression of genocide and terracide upon the Nations and Pueblos of the Confederacy of Anahuac could be mapped with specific quantifiable geographic correlation to the assault of extractive mining industries. Beginning with gold and silver, the export of millions of tons of these stolen metals to feed the industrial revolution of Europe, also cost millions of indigenous Mexican lives during the initial invasion by the Hispanic Colonizers. The numbers most commonly referenced are somewhere between 20-25 million indigenous lives lost between 1521-1600.
We are still attempting to recuperate from the historical trauma which we endured, and continue to endure as children of the Original Nations of Anahuac: the Nican Tlacah. In this process, in order to heal, we found it was necessary to confront the assault of colonization in both external and internal dimensions. We found it was also necessary to seek out our relatives who had survived the pogrom of centuries of genocide, and reestablish the ancient confederacies of alliance and exchange across the hemisphere.
In 1990, this journey brought us to Quito, Ecuador and the First Continental Encounter of Indigenous Nations, Pueblos and Organizations hosted by the CONAIE: the Confederation of Indigenous Nationalities of Ecuador. The CONAIE itself is constituted by three regional indigenous confederations from the Amazon region, the Highlands and the Coast. Presently, we are working with the CONIAE to organize the 20th Anniversary of that First Encounter of the Eagle and the Condor, now set to take place in Quito, Ecuador June 14-16 of 2010.
Most recently, in our planning for the events of next year, and as we attended the IV Continental Indigenous Summit Abya Yala in Puno, Peru in May of this year, a conversation on the need for a Continental Indigenous Network of Indigenous Nations and Pueblos affected by Mining has gathered momentum to the point where come June of 2010 in Quito, this organizing initiative is tentatively programmed for the agenda of the 20th Anniversary event.
Although we are not able to report in person to the Seventh Southwest Indigenous Uranium Forum regarding these developments, please consider this message as an attempt to communicate from your relatives from Abya Yala South, in particular from Mexico, Columbia and Ecuador, in anticipation of connecting as a Continental Indigenous Network of Indigenous Nations and Pueblos affected by Mining.
In closing, may we also humbly ask that you consider in your deliberations of strategy, the concept of the mining of Indigenous Labor as a dimension of the mining issues to be addressed, in particular as we collectively confront the regimes of the "Free Trade" neo-liberal policies such as NAFTA.
Again, all the best. Our prayers and our commitments are with you.
Sincerely,
Tupac Enrique Acosta, Yaotachcauh
Tlahtokan Nahuacalli
TONATIERRAhttp://www.tonatierra.org/
Email: chantlaca@tonatierra.org
Cell: (602) 466-8367

NAHUACALLIEmbassy of the Indigenous Peopleshttp://www.nahuacalli.org/

Wednesday, October 21, 2009

Earthcycles LIVE Thursday morning: Indigenous Uranium Summit


LISTEN: EARTHCYCLES LIVE THURSDAY 8:30 a.m.
through Saturday noon
http://www.earthcycles.net/

Indigenous Uranium Forum
Sky City Hotel

Acoma Pueblo, N.M.
The 7th Indigenous Uranium Forum proposes to focus much needed public attention on the rape of Mount Taylor and to serve as a vehicle to launch a regional inter-tribal campaign to end this madness in the Grants Mineral Belt, Lakota Lands, and elsewhere in Indian Country from the Grand Canyon to White Mesa where deadly and runaway uranium technology threatens the lives of future of our water, land, people, and our winged, four legged and those that crawl relatives. The 7th Southwest Indigenous Uranium Forum will focus on the recent onslaught of exploratory measures to mine and mill uranium in the Grants Mineral Belt. Due to recent price fluctuations of uranium on the world market and United States energy policy still emphasizing nuclear power as an answer to global warming and climate change, we will inform and educate participants of local, national and international nuclear issues impacting Indigenous peoples. The forum will also prioritize presentations on health issues impacting both mining and non-mining populations living in contaminated communities. We will use the forum as an organizing and network initiative to help us better understand the work Indigenous people are doing to fight nuclear power in their communities and move toward alternative forms of energy such as wind and solar.

Earthcycles will broadcast live from the Indigenous Uranium Forum at Sky City, Acoma Pueblo, N.M., on Thursday, from 8:30 a.m. Mountain Time through Saturday noon, Oct. 22-24.

Thursday, October 22, 2009
7:00AM—8AM: Breakfast & Registration
8:30AM: Welcome – Honorable Chandler Sanchez, Governor of Acoma Pueblo
8:45AM: Opening Prayer – Honorable Ron Charlie, 2nd Lieutenant Governor, Acoma Pueblo
9:00AM: Introductions – Manny Pino, Acoma, Professor, “Overview of Acoma Homelands”
9:30AM: Protecting Mt. Taylor: 30 Years of Resistance
• Jon Redhouse, Advisor to SIUF
• “Honoring Diana Ortiz, Women of Acoma: Great Role Model”
• Wild Fire Singers, Taos Drum Group, “Songs for the People”
10:30AM: Break
10:45AM: Inter-Tribal Voice
12:00PM: Lunch (on your own)
1:00PM: Indigenous Nuclear Resistance Panel
• Charmaine White Face, Defenders of the Black Hills, “Impacts of uranium
development on Lakota Lands and World Health Organization Obligation to the UN”
• Rita Capitan, Eastern Navajo Diné Against Uranium Mining
• Supai Waters, Matthew Puetsoy , Carletta Tilousi, Havasupai Tribe, People of
the Blue Green Waters, Protecting Red Butte and Grandmother Canyon
• Nuclear Waste: Margene Bullcreek, Shoshone Paiute
• Indigenous Youth Voices: Nadine Padilla, Autumn Chacon, Nikke Alex & Jihan
Gearon
• Solidarity Statement: Katsumi Furitsu, Japan & Mayra Gomez, Aymara Tribe,
Bolivia
3:00PM: Break
3:15PM: Indigenous Nuclear Resistance Panel
• Gilbert Bedonie, Navajo Dependents of Uranium Workers Committee
• Chris Peters, 7th Generation Fund, “Abya Yala” International Connections
• Updates: Nuclear Regulatory Commission-GEIS Panelist Eric Jantz, NMELC
• Dineh Project, Sarah Adeky and Chris Shuey, SRIC
4:30PM: Adjourn
5:00PM: Dinner & Music by “Indigie Femme”
7:00PM—9:00PM: Evening Activities
1. Networking and relax: It’s your choice
2. Film Screenings: “U38 Womyn” (7 mins), Shonto Prepatory School, Uranium
Research, “Radioactive Mines to Radioactive Weapons” (27 mins) -- Host:
Norman Brown
Friday, October 23, 2009
7:00AM—8AM: Breakfast & Registration
8:30AM: Opening Prayer
8:45AM: Overview/Check in with Forum/Updates
7TH SOUTHWEST INDIGENOUS
URANIUM FORUM
OCTOBER 22 , 23, 24 2009
SKY CITY HOTEL & CASINO
I- 40 AT EXIT 102, ACOMA PUEBLO, NM
9:00AM: Greening Our Economies Panel
• John Fogarty, New Energy Economy
• Louise Bennally, Food Sovereignty
• Cristala Allen, Caddo, Native Workplace
10:30AM: Break
10:45AM: Nuclear Terrorism on Indigenous Lands: Treaty and Human Rights Lens –
Moderator: Manny Pino
• James Zion, Esq. “Public Lands Uranium Resistance: Grand Canyon and
Beyond”
• Taylor McKinnon, Center for Biological Diversity
12:00PM: Lunch (on your own)
1:00PM: Tools for Change – Moderator: Petuuche Gilbert, Acoma
• Multi-Cultural Alliance for a Safe Environment-Best Practice for Alliance
Building Nadine Padilla, Larry King, Jonnie Head, & Rosemarie Cechini
3:00PM: Break
3:15PM: Impact of Uranium Development on Local Communities – Moderator: Laura
Watchempino, Acoma
• Teddy Nez, Carletta Garcia, Al Waconda
4:30PM: Adjourn
5:00PM—6:30PM: Dinner
7:00PM-9:00PM: Film Screening and Discussion – Host: Robert Tohe
• “Return of Navajo Boy” (53 min) & Conversation with Elsie Mae Begay
Saturday, October 24, 2009
7:00AM—8:00AM: Breakfast & Registration
8:00AM: Opening Prayer & Announcements
9:00AM: Guest Speaker, Winona LaDuke, Anishanabe, White Earth Homelands
10:15AM: Beyond Nuclear, Kevin Kamps, Radioactive Waste Watchdog
10:30AM: Break
10:45AM: Strategy Presentations, Draft Press Release, Reach Consensus on Plans of Action,
Assignments, Committee to Carry out Plan of Action, Set Conference Call, & What
organizations are committed?
12:00PM: Wrap Up Discussion
12:30PM: Adjourn
Thank you all for taking the time to share and plan for a Nuclear Free World.

Winona LaDuke (Anishinaabe) is an internationally renowned activist working on issues of sustainable development, renewable energy and food systems. She lives and works on the White Earth reservation in northern Minnesota, and is a two time vice presidential candidate with Ralph Nader for the Green Party. As Program Director of the Honor the Earth, she works nationally and internationally on the issues of climate change, renewable energy, and environmental justice with Indigenous communities. Winona LaDuke will be speaking at the Southwest Indigenous Uranium Forum on Saturday, October 24, 2009 at 9AM.
http://groundswellfilms.org/grandmothers-dc.htm
November 2006 saw the birth of Indigie Femme. Based in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA international performers Indigie Femme combines their traditional and original songs, dance and storytelling, Indigie Femme’s vision is to create global cross-cultural exchange. The lively performances weave ethnic cultures through song, dance, storytelling and facilitating educational workshops in North America and the world. Indigie Femme will be performing at the Forum Thursday, October 22, 2009 at 5PM.
Set in the stunning landscape of Utah's Monument Valley, this unforgettable, universally acclaimed documentary chronicles the extraordinary saga of how a rediscovered 1950s silent film reel leads to the return of a long-lost brother to his Navajo family. Since the 1930s, members of the Cly family have lived in Monument Valley and appeared as subjects in countless photographs, postcards, and Hollywood westerns -- even in a home movie by legendary director John Ford and a propaganda film by a uranium mining company. The film "The Return of Navajo Boy" will be screened at the Forum Friday, October 23, 2009 at 7PM.
Special acknowledgement to the following supporters:
7th Generation Fund
Lannan Foundation
Western Mining Action Network
Bioneers
Available Media, Inc.
Beyond Nuclear
Phil Harrison, Navajo Nation Council Delegate (Cove & Red Valley)

AIM-West salutes the Alcatraz Warriors

The General Public is Invited! For more information (415) 577-1492

AIM-WEST Salutes the Alcatraz Island Warriors of 1969-1971!
A Tribute to the 40th Anniversary

By AIM West
Photo: Bill Means, Lenny Foster and Mike Flores on Alcatraz 2008/Photo Brenda Norrell

PROCLAMATION:

“To the Great White Father and All His People, WE THE NATIVE AMERICANS, reclaim the land known as Alcatraz Island in the name of all American Indians by right of discovery. We wish to be fair and honorable in our dealings with the Caucasian inhabitants of this land, and hereby offer the following treaty: We will purchase said Alcatraz Island for twenty-four dollars ($24) in glass beads and red cloth, a precedent set by the white man’s purchase of a similar island about 300 years ago. We know that $24 in trade goods for these 16 acres is more than was paid when Manhattan Island was sold, but we know that land values have risen over the years. Our off of $ 1.24 per acre is greater than the 47 cents per acre the white men are now paying the California Indians for their land….Signed, Indians of All Tribes, November 1969, San Francisco, California.” With this profound proclamation and the gallant actions necessitated by the young brave’s so began a movement of Indigenous activism that awoke America, and sent a thunder-clap around the world that has now culminated in the historic adoption by the United Nations General Assembly on September 13, 2007 of the “Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples”.
Please make a date to be with us Wednesday, November 4th to honor and commemorate those warriors who sacrificed and gave of their time and placed themselves in social turmoil to help re-claim the destiny for all Indians of the Americas.

Place: La Pena Cultural Center, 3105 Shattuck Ave. Berkeley, http://www.lapena.org/calendar
Time: 6:30 to 9:30 pm
Film: “Alcatraz Is Not An Island” (starts at 7 pm!)
M.C.’s Jimbo Simmons (AIM), and Mary Jean Robertson (S.F. KPOO radio personality)
And with Special Guest Speakers, with music by Goodshield, Drummers and Singers welcome, and Traditional Dancers!
Cover Charge $ 8.00 slide-scale, no one turned away. A food can drive is also requested for Oakland Inter-Tribal Friendship House. A raffle prize, and a blanket donation is requested.

On this occasion of the 40th Anniversary of the Occupation of Alcatraz Island, a special benefit by American Indian Movement-WEST (AIM-WEST) invites you to join us and acknowledge all those heroic warriors representing “Indians of All Tribes” who sought to liberate The Rock, (first landing Nov. 14th) that began November 20, 1969 until being led off the island June 11, 1971. Their mission and purpose; to enlighten the American people of the injustice done to the American Indian by stealing their land by phony treaties.

During the 19 months of the occupation 20,000 people visited Alcatraz Island, meanwhile a medical clinic was set up, the structure of day-to-day life needed formulation, children needed schooling, a leadership structure needed to be created to tend the affairs of Alcatraz community; the Black Panthers offered help; Credence Clearwater Revival donated $15,000; a child was born (July 20, 1970), the 12 year-old daughter of Richard Oakes, the foremost leader of the Alcatraz occupation, fell over a railing and died on January 8, 1970; and the light house and several buildings burned to the ground.

Against this backdrop the leadership at Alcatraz began negotiations with government officials setting the stage for confrontations with dishonest politicians, onerous developers and bureaucrats. Come and share your experiences, thoughts and vision of what this occasion has meant to you, the youth, and community.

Free Leonard Peltier! Freedom for All Political Prisoners! Protect Sacred Sites! Honor the Treaties! Acknowledge and review the 18 Unratified Treaties made with the California’s American Indians! And demand the US government sign the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples! (only three countries have not signed: USA, Canada, and New Zealand!)

*Mark your calendars now for the AIM West Coast Third Annual Gathering November 23-27, 2009. *M.C. Mr. Bill Means, National AIM Grand Council, and Board Member of International Indian Treaty Council, a United Nations NGO in consultative status.
Donations are appreciated. Check AIM-WEST website for more information. All My Relations!
Wheelchair accessible
http://www.aimwest.info/