August 2020

Indigenous Peoples and Human Rights

Monday, March 22, 2010

Poetry and Art: The FBI, Indian Country and Surveillance


Freedom of Information: The FBI, Indian Country, and Surveillance’

By Staci Golar
Image 2: Hoover COINTELPRO file

SANTA FE, NM — Three poets and over 15 visual artists will explore the complex and often violent relationship between Native Americans and the Federal Bureau of Information in the art show, Freedom of Information The FBI, Indian Country, and Surveillance. Their works will examine the volatile times of the 1960s and 1970s, when the FBI’s COINTELPRO program sought to crush Indian activism, up to the present where technology allows intrusion into our personal lives to a previously unimaginable degree.
An opening reception will take place Friday, April 30th, from 6:00 – 9:00 pm at Ahalenia Studios, located at 1422 Second Street at Jay Street in Santa Fe. This event is free and open to the public. Cheyenne and Muscogee activist, policymaker, and author Suzan Shown Harjo will read her poetry at the opening reception. The show will be open to the public from 1:00 – 6:00 pm on the following three weekends:May 1, 2, 8, 9, 15, and 16. During the week, from May 2 to May 14, the show will be open by appointment, which can be arranged via ahalenia@gmail.com.
America Meredith and Ishkoten Dougi are co-curating the show. Meredith’s father, Howard Meredith directed the Indian Office of the Episcopal Church in the early 1970s. Because of his role, Meredith’s father had FBI tails and his phone was tapped. When as a teenager, she asked her father about the early 1970s, he told her to look up his FBI file, using the
Freedom of Information act, giving the show its name.
Ishkoten Dougi, a New Mexico native and prolific artist, has recently dealt with the FBI, which has been investigating the brutal murder of his little brother.
Indian Country has a much more intimate relationship with the Federal Bureau of Investigation than most of America. The Seven Major Crimes Act of 1885 gave the FBI jurisdiction over reservations when dealing with such major crimes as murder – and Indian Country certainly needs law enforcement. However, in the 1960s and 1970s, the FBI also famously launched COINTELPRO, a covert program to undermine activist organizations that the government deemed threatening, and particularly Native American rights organizations. Families, even loosely affiliated with activist organizations, were followed, monitored, and harassed. Ground zero for clashes between the FBI and Native peoples was Pine Ridge, South Dakota, from 1973 to 1975, when hundreds of murders have gone unsolved.
Today the federal government conducts warrantless wiretapping under the Obama administration. The intrusive surveillance familiar to Indian Country is now experienced by all US citizens. Equally disturbing is the amount of information about ourselves that we freely give away to corporations via social networking.
This art show will explore the personal experiences of artists who have been incarcerated, threatened, attacked, or spied upon by the FBI, but also artists who have worked with the FBI as prosecutors and who have been helped by the FBI in investigations. Artists explore the effect of these experiences on their personal lives. We also examine how, due to technological advances, surveillance has become utterly ubiquitous and even accepted in today’s world. Now most photographs and videos are taken by machines, not human beings. What does this lack of privacy mean to us individually and collectively? How does it change our behavior? And where ultimately will it lead us?

Participating poets are:
• Suzan Shown Harjo (Cheyenne and Hodulgee Muscogee), president of the Morning Star Institute in Washington, D.C., a founding trustee of the National Museum of the American Indian, and an award-winning writer.
• Ron Salkin (Oglala Lakota), a San Francisco bike messenger and published author.
• John Trudell (Santee Dakota), poet, national recording artist, actor and activist. Trudell worked with the American Indian Movement (AIM) serving as Chairman of AIM from 1973 to 1979.
Participating visual artists include:
• Marcus Amerman (Choctaw), bead, glass, and video artist, as well as painter as performance artist, whose alter ego is Buffalo Man.
• Ross Chaney (Osage/Cherokee), video artist and 2-D artist, whose drawings are influenced by his formal training in Japanese calligraphy. • Ishkoten Dougi (Jicarilla Apache/Navajo), expressionist and vision painter and printmaker, and show co-curator. This art show is dedicated to the memory of his brother, Naayaitch Friday, who was brutally murdered on 11 April 2009.
• Gina Gray (Osage Nation), painter living in Pawhuska, Oklahoma. Gray left IAIA to join the Wounded Knee Occupation at Pine Ridge in 1973 for six weeks.
• Teri Greeves (Kiowa/Comanche), bead artist whose work is in the British Museum. She was featured in the PBS documentary, Craft in America.
• April Holder (Sauk and Fox/Tonkawa/Wichita), painting on fabric. Her father’s FBI tails actually stayed in the hospital when April was born in 1984.
• Alex Jacobs (Mohawk) painter, installation artist, and musician in Santa Fe.
• Saige LaFountain (Turtle Mountain Chippewa/Navajo) and Samuel LaFountain (Turtle Mountain Chippewa/Navajo) are brothers and award-winning artists. Saige is known for his bronze and stone sculptures and Samuel creates hand-stamped jewelry inlaid with an exotic array of stones; however, both will be creating experimental pieces in new media.
• America Meredith (Cherokee Nation) will exhibit mixed media paintings and sculpture.
• Leonard Peltier (Turtle Mountain Chippewa/Lakota), lithograph prints. The most prominent political prisoner in the United States, Peltier is currently in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania.
• Kevin and Valerie Pourier (Oglala Lakota), who live on the Pine Ridge Reservation, create polished buffalo horn carvings that are channeled inlaid with crushed gemstones. They marry tradition, aesthetics, and social commentary in his unique, utilitarian sculptures.
• Billy Soza Warsoldier (Cahuilla/Apache), Chicago Arts Institute and IAIA alumnus, successfully fought the California Department of Corrections for the right to not cut one’s hair for religious reasons.
• Stephen Wall (White Earth Chippewa-Seneca), creator of Technododems,which merge micro-technological artifacts with natural materials. Currently he is head of IAIA’s Indigenous Liberal Studies program and president of SWAIA’s board.
• Richard Ray Whitman (Yuchi/Pawnee) – a photographer, digital artist, videographer, actor and a longtime outspoken activist for Indigenous rights.
• Dwayne Wilcox (Oglala Lakota). Wilcox grew up on Pine Ridge and his historically informed ledger drawings offer humorous and biting critiques of contemporary society.

DESCRIPTION
April 30 - May 6

Indian Country has a much more intimate relationship with the Federal Bureau of Investigation than most of America. The 1885 Seven Major Crimes Act gave the FBI jurisdiction over reservations when dealing with such major crimes as murder. In the 1960s and 1970s, the FBI also famously launched COINTELPRO, a covert program to undermine activist organizations that the government deemed threatening, particularly Native American rights organizations. Families, even loosely affiliated with activist organizations, were followed, monitored, and harassed.

Today the federal government conducts warrantless wiretapping under the Obama administration. The intrusive surveillance familiar to Indian Country is now experienced by all US citizens. Equally disturbing is the amount of information about ourselves that we freely give away to corporations via social networking.

This art show explores the personal experiences of artists who have been incarcerated, threatened, attacked, or spied upon by the FBI, but also artists who have worked with the FBI as prosecutors and who have been helped by the FBI in investigations. Artists explore the effect of these experiences on their personal lives. We also examine how, due to technological advances, surveillance has become utterly ubiquitous and even accepted in today's world. What does this lack of privacy mean to us individually and collectively? How does it change our behavior? And where ultimately will it lead us?

US 'Listening Sessions' Berkeley and San Francisco

United States Government To Conduct Consultations or “Listening Sessions”

On US International Human Rights Obligations
BERKELEY CONSULTATION
The Bancroft Hotel
http://www.bancrofthotel.com/
2680 Bancroft Way, Berkeley, CA 94704
Thursday, March 25, 2010, from 8:30 AM to 12:30 PM

SAN FRANCISCO CONSULTATION
Mclaren Conference Center, University of San Francisco
2130 Fulton Street
San Francisco, CA 94117

Friday, March 26, 2010, from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
The United Nations Human Rights Council will examine the United States’ compliance with its legally-binding obligations under its signed and ratified Human Rights treaties as well as the UN Charter and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

The process of this examination is called, “Universal Periodic Review” or “UPR”, in which the human rights compliance of every UN member state is reviewed every four years. This November will be the United States’ first review since the process’ creation
As part of the UPR process, the U.S. government is required to conduct consultations with stakeholders, including non-governmental organizations, civil society and those facing rights violations, to provide input regarding human rights in the United States. The government selected several cities in the US, including San Francisco and Berkeley, in which to conduct listening sessions or consultations.
The Bay Area consultations will be held on March 25-26th, 2010.
A half day consultation will be held in Berkeley on Thursday, March 25, 2010 from 8:30 AM - 12:30 PM and will focus on Health, Education, and State Accountability followed by an open comment period.
On Friday, March 26, 2010 from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM, the Mclaren Conference Center at the University of San Francisco will host a discussion on the human rights challenges faced in San Francisco and surrounding communities. Representatives of the U.S. Department of State and other federal agencies will be in attendance to inform their report to the Universal Periodic Review (UPR).
The meetings will be recorded, and a written report of the meeting will be prepared and posted on the U.S. Department of State’s website. This summary may be used as part of the U.S. government’s submission to the Human Rights Council. Organizations are also welcome to submit a 5-page report directly to the UN before April 19th.
In addition, participating organizations are providing a training on the UPR to be held on Wednesday, March 24th from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM at the Mission Cultural Center, Studio D, 2868 Mission St. San Francisco.
PARTICIPATION
Your input is vital to this process. Accordingly, we have reserved time for public comment and participation on the agenda. To ensure there is time for input from the widest community, comments need to be a maximum of two minutes in length for each topic. Please reference the human rights obligation being violated and provide a recommendation for how the government can improve this situation. We welcome your contribution and encourage you to join us to ensure that the U.S. government representatives attending this meeting receive accurate information on the human rights challenges faced by our communities.
If you are interested in participating, please register on this site. If you know of others who would like to attend, please forward them this invitation and ask them to register as well.
ACCOMMODATIONS FOR SAN FRANCISCO
The email you received with this link included a hotel listing for the University of San Francisco area and instructions on travel to the campus. The Mclaren Center at the University of San Francisco is wheelchair accessible. If you require a disability accommodation such as a Sign Language interpreter or print materials in alternative formats, or have any questions about accommodations, please contact Katelyn Keil. Her telephone number is 510-644-2555 (v/TDD) and her email is kkeil@dredf.org. Please contact Katie by March 12, 2010 if you require an accommodation.

SAN FRANCISCO PROPOSED AGENDA
Friday, March 26th, 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
-Program Subject To Change-
Schedule:
8:30-9:00 - Registration
9:00-9:30 - Welcome, Introductions, and Overview of UPR Consultation Process
9:30-10:30 - Panel 1 - Race Discrimination
Moderator: Alberto Sadamando (International Indian Treaty Council)
Linda Burnham (Women of Color Resource Center)
Arnoldo Garcia (National Network for Immigrant and Refugee Rights)
Lakota Harden (Bay Native Circle)
10:30-11:30 - Panel 2 – LGBT rights issues
Moderator: Shannon Minter (National Center for Lesbian Rights) - Hate crimes, employment discrimination, immigration discrimination, and need for health benefits for same-sex partners of federal employees
Sylvia Guerrero - Increasing hate crimes based on sexual orientation and gender identity
Shirley Tan -Lack of recognition of LGBT families in immigration law
Cecilia Chung - Employment discrimination in the U.S. and lack of protections
Henry Pacheco - Workplace discrimination in the federal government
11:30-12:30 - Panel 3 - Criminal justice; Death Penalty; Prison Conditions
Moderator: Professor Connie de la Vega (University of San Francisco School of Law)
Michelle Leighton (Center for Law and Global Justice) –Juvenile Life Sentences Without Possibility of Parole
Alison Parker (Human Rights Watch) –Racial discrimination in anti-drug laws
Don Specter (Prison Law Office) – Prison overcrowding in California
12:30-1:30 Lunch (on your own)
1:30-2:30 - Panel 4 - Disability Rights
Moderator: Professor Connie de la Vega (University of San Francisco School of Law)
Kim Swain (Disability Rights California) - Progress/challenges concerning deinstitutionalization and prevention of institutionalization of people with disabilities in the SF and Northern California areas
Mary Lou Breslin (Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund (DREDF)) - Healthcare access for people with disabilities
Claudia Center (Disability Rights Programs of the Legal Aid Society) - Employment with a focus on people with pscyhosocial disabilities
2:30-3:30 - Panel 5 - Environmental Justice
Moderator: Morning Star Gali (International Indian Treaty Council)
Rev. Henry Clark (West County Toxics Coalition) - Shell Refinery
Jim Brown (Pomo Nation) - Mercury poisoning in California waters
or Sherri Norris (California Indian Environmental Alliance) - Mercury poisoning in California waters
3:30-4:30 - Open discussion on topics not covered above
4:30-5:00 - Closing remarks and Adjournment
Organizations participating in the planning and coordinating of the San Francisco Session include: Asian Pacific Environmental Network: http://www.apen4ej.org//
Center for Law and Global and Justice: http://www.law.usfca.edu/centers/clgj/index.html
Council for Global Equality: http://www.globalequality.org/
Disability Rights Education Defense Fund: http://www.dredf.org/
Human Rights Advocates: http://www.humanrightsadvocates.org/
International Indian Treaty Council, http://www.treatycouncil.org/
Meiklejohn Civil Liberties Institute: http://mcli.org/
National Network for Immigrant and Refugee Rights, http://www.nnirr.org/
West County Toxics Coalition: http://westcountytoxicscoalition.org/
Women of Color Resource Center: http://www.coloredgirls.org/
University of San Francisco Law School: http://www.usfca.edu/law/
US Human Rights Network: http://www.ushrnetwork.org/campaign_upr

BERKELEY PROPOSED AGENDA
Thursday, March 25th, 8:30 AM to 12:30 PM
-Program Subject To Change-
Schedule:
8:30-9:00 - Registration

9:00-9:30 - Welcome, Introductions, and Overview of UPR Consultation Process
9:30-10:45 - Panel 1 - Health and Education: no one left out?

-- Panelists
Justice Now: Incarcerated women - http://www.jnow.org/
National Lawyers Guild: Accountability of Government Officials - http://www.nigsf.org/
Meiklejohn Civil Liberties Institute: Berkeley Resolution - http://www.mcli.org/
WILD for Human Rights/Initiative of the Miller Center, UC Berkely: San Francisco incorporation of CEDAW - http://www.law.berkeley.edu/mgcl.htm

-- Participant/Open Comments on State Accountability
-- Dialogue with Government Officials
11:45-12:15 - Participant/Open Comments on topics not covered above
12:15-12:30 - Closing remarks and Adjournment
Organizations participating in the Oakland/Berkeley Session
Alliance for Justice
Amnesty International USA (WRO)
Asian Law Caucus (TBC)
Boalt Hall Committee for Human Rights
Boalt Alliance to Abolish Torture
Center for Justice and Accountability
Community Water Center (pending)
Ella Baker Center - Books Not Bars Campaign
Institute for Redress & Recovery at Santa Clara University
Justice Now
Meiklejohn Civil Liberties Institute
Mujeres Unidas y Activas
National Lawyers Guild, Committee Against Torture
National Lawyers Guild, Boalt Hall Chapter
Public Advocates
Transgender, Gender Variant and Intersex Justice Project
UC Davis Immigration Law Clinic
WILD for Human Rights, Initiative of the Miller Center for Global Challenges and the Law, UC Berkeley
UPR TRAINING
Participating organizations will provide a training for all interested parties on Wednesday, March 24th from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM at the Mission Cultural Center, Studio D, 2868 Mission St. San Francisco.
The training will provide an indepth explanation of the UPR process, a review of US international treaty obligations, guidelines on how best to make use of the UPR process and a conversation about continuing involvement in the UPR process.
Please Register if you would like to attend.
UPR INFORMATION
For more information on the Universal Periodic Review process itself, please visit the following websites:
United Nations UPR: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/HRbodies/UPR/Pages/UPRSessions.aspx
US Department of State UP: http://www.state.gov/g/drl/upr/
US Human Rights Network UPR web site: http://www.ushrnetwork.org/campaign_upr
IITC Web Page: www.treatycouncil.org/home.htm [click right column “Human Rights ‘Listening’ Sessions…” and, “New IITC Fact Sheet…”.

Human Rights Project at the Urban Justice Center “UPR toolkit”: http://www.hrpujc.org/documents/UPRtoolkit.pdf

Sithe abandons Nevada coal-fired power plant proposal

Phillip Yates, Program Coordinator, Resource Media
1900 13th St., Suite 206, Boulder, CO 80302

office) 720.564.0500 ext.14, mobile) 720.206.9543, phillip@resource-media.org
www.resource-media.org

Toquop Announcement Clears Way for Clean Energy
Plant was last coal-fired project in Nevada

Navajos fighting Sithe Global on Navajo Nation, hope Desert Rock will be halted
By Phillip Yates
Resource Media

LAS VEGAS – A decision by the Sithe Global Energy to abandon a proposal for a new coal-burning power plant near Mesquite, Nevada drew praise from a diverse group of voices who applauded the end to one of the last remaining obstacles in the state’s transition to a full-fledged clean energy economy.

Sithe’s parent company, the Blackstone Group, officially announced on a conference call this afternoon that it was dropping the proposed 750-megawatt Toquop Energy Project. Joining Blackstone’s Tony James was Senator Harry Reid and Mesquite Mayor Susan Holecheck. The company said that it is instead pursuing a 700-MW natural gas plant with a 100-MW photovoltaic solar plant.

“With its vast wind, solar and geothermal resources and potential for meeting demand with energy efficiency programs, the decision to move away from coal really does bode well for Nevada,” said Charles Benjamin, the state director of Western Resource Advocates. “It opens doors to an even swifter transition to 21st century energy technologies that will create jobs and revitalize Nevada’s economy.”

Early in 2009, there were still three proposals for new coal-burning power plants in Nevada, which would have generated 4,850 megawatts of electricity, enough to power roughly 2.4 million homes. NV Energy shelved its 2,500 MW Ely Energy Center in February and LS Power followed a month later when it abandoned plans for the 1,600-MW White Pine Energy Station. Both companies, whose plants would have been located near Ely, cited the financial risks, uncertainty of coal and the desire to move forward with projects focused more on renewable energy technologies. Toquop was the last of the three plants still moving forward.

“Nevada’s future lies with clean renewable energy, not outdated fossil fuel technologies,” said Steve Rypka, a renewable energy and green living consultant who owns GreenDream Enterprises in Henderson. “Clearing the last obstacle out of the way for that to happen is a big step forward for Nevada.”

Residents of Mesquite and southeastern Nevada, along with their counterparts just across the border in southwestern Utah, had fought the Toquop plant for years over concerns about pollution from its smokestacks and the effect on scarce local water resources. They said Sithe’s decision would help protect the region’s air quality and public health.

“We can all breathe a little easier now,” said Michele Burkett of the group Defend Our Desert. “Now we hope that this can pave the way for Nevada to become our nation’s leader in developing home-grown clean, renewable energy. That will enable us to become an energy exporter while growing our own economy with good long-term jobs.”

Former Public Utilities Commissioner and Nevada Consumer Advocate Tim Hay said the decision by Sithe and Blackstone are in line with trends by utilities and power companies nationwide. In the last several years, more than 125 proposals for coal-burning plants have been halted as developers or regulators determine that there are affordable and reliable options to coal that don’t have its financial risks or require the expenditure of billions of dollars.

“More and more power providers and investors are realizing the high risks associated with coal, while at the same time looking for ways that new and existing demand can be met with a combination of cleaner energy sources and also a full menu of energy efficiency measures,” said Hay. “Ultimately, that’s good for both shareholders and rate-paying customers.”

Navajos living in the Four Corners area have been fighting a plan by Sithe to build a coal-fired power plant on Navajo Nation land near Farmington, N.M. Dooda Desert Rock continues their grassroots resistance to Desert Rock power plant, which would be the third in the area.

Cindy Sheehan: Anti-War Camp Out Now near National Monument

Anti-war Activist Cindy Sheehan arrested at White House
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VYleO9BWdX8
DEMOCRACY NOW: Sheehan Sets Up “Camp OUT NOW” in Antiwar Protest
We go to Washington, DC to speak with antiwar activist Cindy Sheehan, founder of the group Peace of the Action, who has set up a camp near the Washington Monument calling on President Obama to end the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Sheehan’s son Casey was killed while serving in Iraq on April 4, 2004.
http://www.democracynow.org/
Mar 21, 2010 11:32 am US/Eastern
6 Anti-War Protesters To Spend Weekend In Jail
WASHINGTON (AP) ― Activist Cindy Sheehan and five other anti-war protesters are spending the rest of the weekend in jail after being arrested outside the White House.A total of eight people were arrested after laying coffins at a White House fence at the end of Saturday's anti-war march. Sgt. David Schlosser says two people were released, but the other six had to stay in jail because they have out-of-state addresses. They'll be arraigned Monday in D.C. Superior Court. Of the eight people, Schlosser says four, including Sheehan, are charged with crossing a police line, and four are charged with disobeying an official order. Sheehan, whose son was killed in Iraq in April 2004, staged a prolonged demonstration in 2005 outside then-President George W. Bush's ranch near Crawford, Texas.

Drone protesters arrested at Tucson airshow

March 21, 2010
Contact in Tucson: Felice and Jack Cohen-Joppa at 520-323-8697

"WAR IS NOT A SHOW" BANNER-HOLDERS ARRESTED
AT DAVIS MONTHAN AIR FORCE BASE


TUCSON -- On Sunday afternoon, March 21, at the Aerospace and Arizona Days military exhibition and air show at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, two Tucson residents were arrested for trespass. John Heid, 55, and Gretchen Nielsen, 77, unfurled a banner declaring "War is Not a Show" and stood peacefully near the Predator UAV (Unmanned aerial vehicle).

Nielsen stated, "When I see the display at the Air Show --- the fighter planes, the bombers, the attack aircraft ---I see a display of yesterday's toys. When I see the ground control station and data terminal for the unmanned MQ-1 Predator, I see an extension of teenage computer games. When I see our young adults in uniform who have been trained to kill on command, I see yesterday's children.

"When I see proud, patriotic parents and grandparents enjoying the thrill of war games at the Air Show, I see tomorrow's parents and grandparents begging what's left of the world for forgiveness."

Heid stated, "War is not a show. It is killing us. And them. Combatants and children alike. Our soul and civil society. The moral order too is a casualty. War is hell. Not a cause for celebration. A frontal assault on reason. And the earth. War is not a spectacle or family entertainment.

"Today at the Air Show we see its shiny weapons, not its bloody victims. Not the nearly 4,400 dead U.S. soldiers. Not the tens of thousands of Iraqi, Afghani or Pakistani civilians. We glorify the mighty flying death machines and ignore the havoc they wreak.

"Today, just after the seventh anniversary of the war on Iraq, we vigil beside an MQ-1 Predator drone. Over 700 Pakistani civilians have been killed by this machine's Hellfire missiles. Davis-Monthan is home base for the 214th Reconnaissance Group of the Arizona National Guard which flies around-the-clock combat missions over Iraq and Afghanistan with the Predator.

"In the shadow of death we raise our plea for peace. For skies free of weaponry. For an end to war without end. The show is over, let peace begin."

The pair was taken to the Pima County Jail, where they were processed and released by 10 p.m. They are scheduled to appear in Tucson City Court for arraignment - Heid on April 29 and Nielsen on April 30.

Photos may be viewed at http://tinyurl.com/WarIsNotAShow

Mining company wants Tsilhquot'in film censored at public hearing



Mining company wants film sympathetic to Tsilhqot'in barred from public hearing
UPDATE: Public Hearing Schedule

By Andrew MacLeod March 17, 2010
http://thetyee.ca/Blogs/TheHook/Aboriginal-Affairs/2010/03/17/FishLakeFilm/
Photo: http://www.raventrust.com/
Taseko Mines Ltd. is seeking to prevent a federal panel reviewing its proposal for a gold and copper mine in northern British Columbia from showing a public hearing a documentary it says is biased in favour of the Tsilhqot'in First Nation, who are opposed to the project.

The Tsilhqot'in National Government had requested the film, Blue Gold: The Tsilhqot'in Fight for Teztan Biny (Fish Lake), be shown during a public hearing on Taseko's proposal, according to a message sent today to review panel participants by the panel's chair Robert Connelly.

A lawyer acting for Taseko, Keith Clark with the Vancouver firm Lang Michener, outlined the company's concerns in an e-mail to the review panel yesterday. “It is not evidence,” he wrote. “It is a propaganda film, produced to influence the opinions or behaviour of people, by providing deliberately biased content in an emotional context. By its nature, there is no opportunity for Taseko or anyone else to challenge it. When it is finished it is done. There is no one to answer questions or clarify any of the assertions.”

An e-mail distributed through the Friends of the Nemaiah Valley, one of the groups that funded the documentary directed by Susan Smitten, says Blue Gold is an important film. “It documents the voices of the Tsilhqot'in people themselves,” it said. “These voices are not filtered . . . They are the honest and deeply sincere voices of people who are defending their traditional territory.

“Taseko continues to trivialize these voices by labeling the film 'propaganda.'”

The panel intends to consider Taseko's objection during its first day of hearings in Williams Lake on March 22, Connelly wrote.

You can watch Blue Gold here:








Blue Gold: The Tsilhqot'in Fight for Teztan Biny (Fish Lake) from Susan Smitten on Vimeo.

Blue Gold: The Tsilhqot'in Fight for Teztan Biny (Fish Lake) from Susan Smitten on Vimeo.

Update: On March 18 the documentary was relabeled as "private" on Vimeo, the site where it is hosted. The issue was technical, we're told, and it was again available by mid-afternoon.

Andrew MacLeod is The Tyee’s Legislative Bureau Chief in Victoria. Reach him here.



Agenda for Public Hearings

Message from John Hummel

I used to work for the Tsilhqot'in people in this film. They contacted me for support yesterday. That crazy mining company Taseko wants to turn their lake into a toxic tailings pond with stuff like arsenic and mercury in it! Hope you share this email and link to the film far and wide!
All the best to you.

For Land and Life,
John H.W. Hummel

Link to watch film Taseko Mines wants to censor at the public hearings today in Williams Lake, B.C.:

http://thetyee.ca/Blogs/TheHook/Aboriginal-Affairs/2010/03/17/FishLakeFilm

AGENDA FOR PUBLIC HEARINGS

This hearing is in Williams Lake, B.C. - This is the Mine where they want to turn a whole lake into a Toxic Tailings Pond!
Note: I Got the Agenda Below from the Internet
Saturday, March 20, 2010
Update to Speakers' List for this week's Prosperity Mine Federal Review Public Hearings. I've received an updated list to the delegation (speakers') list at the Federal Review Panel for the proposed Prosperity Mine. Here it is: (Updated as of Saturday at 7:45am)

Monday, March 22 - Gibraltar Room, Cariboo Memorial Complex
Daytime Session - 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Taseko Mines Ltd.

Tsilhqot’in National Government - Chiefs

Mandell Pinder – Counsel for the Canoe Creek (Bruce Stadfeld)

University of Victoria – ENVS461 Class (Dr. Karen Hurley & students)

Monday, March 22nd - Gibraltar Room, Cariboo Memorial Complex
Evening Session - 7-9 p.m.

Connie Jones

Josee Galipeau

Mining Suppliers Association of BC (Dave Sharples)

Share the Cariboo-Chilcotin Resources Society (Bill Carruthers)

Cariboo Chevrolet Buick GMC Ltd. (Brian Garland & Tammy Tugnum)

Council of Canadians (Meera Karunananthan and Harjap Grewal)

Cariboo Chilcotin Conservation Society (Alice Stoddard)

Tuesday, March 23 - Gibraltar Room, Cariboo Memorial Complex
Daytime Session - 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

City of Williams Lake (Mayor Kerry Cook)

The Williams Lake Construction Association (Kevin Bourdon, Grant Barley, Bonnie Griffith, Bryan Neufeld)

Mining Association of BC (Pierre Gratton)

Williams Lake Field Naturalists (Fred McMechan)

Tsilhqot’in National Government - Chiefs

Tsilhqot’in National Government - (Roger Williams, Loretta Williams)

Xat’sull (Soda Creek) First Nation - (Thomas Phillips)

Tuesday, March 23rd - Gibraltar Room, Cariboo Memorial Complex
Evening Session - 7-9 p.m.

Ranchland Honda (David Baye)

Doug Wilson

Russell Samuel Myers Ross

Federico Osorio

Jane Wellburn

Christine Hornby

Great West Equipment (Andrew Thompson)

Wednesday, March 23 - Gibraltar Room, Cariboo Memorial Complex
Daytime Session - 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Health Canada (Dr. Carl Alleyne, Luc Pelletier)

Natural Resources Canada (Rob Johnstone, Margo Burgess, Kathy McPherson)

Fisheries and Oceans Canada (TBD)

Transport Canada (John Mackie, Linda Sullivan)

B.C. Chamber of Commerce (Jon Garson and John Winters)

Mining Watch Canada (Ramsey Hart)

Tsilhqot’in National Government - Chiefs

Tsilhqot’in National Government – Chilko Watershed Roundtable

Tsilhqot’in National Government – Invasive Plant Committee

Tsilhqot’in National Government – Archaeology First Nations Field Assistants

Tsilhqot’in National Government (Helen Haig-Brown)

Wednesday, March 24 - Gibraltar Room, Cariboo Memorial Complex
Evening Session - 7-9 p.m.

Tsilhqot’in National Government – Movie presentation: “Blue Gold: The Tsilhqot’in Fight for Teztan Biny (Fish Lake)” Pending: A motion has been received from Taseko Mines Limited, objecting to the showing of the film. The Panel will make its decision on the first day of the hearing after giving the motion due consideration. Please see the Project’s public registry, CEAR document #1791

Thursday, March 25
Daytime Session - 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. @ Room 119, Pioneer Complex (351 Hodgson Road)

Stephanie Bird

Williams Lake & District Chamber of Commerce (Susan Redford)

Taseko Lake Outfitters (Siegfried Reuter)

Tsilhqot’in National Government - Xeni Gwet’in Cultural Tourism Program

Williams Lake Tribune (Lorne Doerkson)

Pacific Coastal Airlines (Daryl Smith)

Council of Canadians – Williams Lake Chapter (John Dressler)

Tsilhqot’in National Government - Chiefs

Tsilhqot’in National Government - (Linda Myers, Maria Myers)

Friday, March 26th - Valley Room, the Lodge in 100 Mile House, BC
Daytime Session - 12:00pm to 5:00pm & Evening Session - 7:00pm to 9:00pm

Taseko Mines Ltd. (Brief overview presentation, and questions)

Lower Bridge Creek Water Stewardship Society (Gordon Hoglund)

Yalakom Ecological Society (Karley Zibeau)

Rob Henneker

100 Mile House Mayor Mitch Campsall

Saturday, March 27th - Alexis Creek Community Hall
Daytime Session - 10:00am to 6:00pm

Taseko Mines Ltd. (Brief overview presentation, and questions)

Cariboo Regional District (Area 'K' Director Rick Mumford)

Other Information:

• Doors to the hearing room open at 9 a.m. each day. At this time, late registration will be taken for those that wish to present to the panel in the general sessions (subject to availability).

• Late registration will also be taken at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday for those that wish to present to the panel in the evening session (subject to availability).

• There will be a lunch break at 12 p.m. each day.

• The General Hearing Session Monday begins with opening comments from the Panel Chair and preliminary matters and motions.

• Taseko Mines’ presentation on March 22 is expected to be 60-90 minutes, followed by questions.