Sunday, March 22, 2020

Navajo Nation has 26 cases of coronavirus as stay at home order goes into effect

President Jonathan Nez offered his appreciation and prayers by phone to a group of Navajo firefighters as they prepare to enter the community of Chilchinbeto to deliver care packages to residents, including elderly and high-risk. The first responders will be wearing protective gear when they enter the community and will not make person-to-person contact to prevent the spread of COVID-19. (Photos Navajo Nation President's Office)
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Navajo Nation reports 26 cases of coronavirus, as cases also are confirmed in surrounding areas of Flagstaff and Page in Arizona and McKinley County in New Mexico

Total confirmed COVID-19 cases reach 26 as Navajo Nation’s “Stay at Home Order” goes into effect

Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez and Vice President Myron Lizer

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WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. — Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez and Vice President Myron Lizer were informed by the Navajo Department of Health and Navajo Area Indian Health Service on Saturday, that the number of positive tests for COVID-19 has reached a total of 26 for residents of the Navajo Nation.

This includes 18 cases from the Kayenta Service Unit, four from the Chinle Service Unit, three from the Tuba City Service Unit, and one from the Crownpoint Service Unit. As of Saturday, there are no confirmed deaths related to COVID-19 for residents of the Navajo Nation.

A Public Health Emergency “Stay at Home Order” is now in effect requiring all residents of the Navajo Nation to remain home and isolated and all non-essential businesses to close to prevent the further spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus. The previous shelter-in-place order for the community of Chilchinbeto in now expanded to the entire Navajo Nation.



“Everyone needs to stay home, that’s how we will start to beat this virus. To prevent a massive health crisis, every person must remain home. We know some may need food, medicine, or other essential items, but beyond that we shouldn’t have anyone traveling or going out into the public. This includes public gatherings and meetings,” said President Nez.

In a short period of time, COVID-19 has arrived on the Navajo Nation and the number of cases reached 26 on March 21. While joint tribal and IHS epidemiologist teams are working to stop the virus’s spread, the degree of contact of contagious individuals and the subsequent degree of exposure is unknown. According to the “Stay In Place” Order, continued person-to-person spread throughout the Navajo Nation poses an extensive and substantial public health risk,.

“There are people who are testing negative for COVID-19 and that is good news, but there are still many more tests that the Navajo Department of Health and the Navajo Area IHS are waiting for results and confirmation,” President Nez added.

The order also outlines provisions for “essential activities, essential businesses, and any work necessary to the operations and maintenance of essential infrastructure.” It further states that Navajo Nation citizens are required to stay home and undertake only those outings absolutely necessary for their health, safety, or welfare as described in the Order.

“Stay home, stay safe, save lives! That’s the message we are sending out to the Navajo Nation to protect our communities from further spread of COVID-19. Every day, we are praying for our people who are sick and their families. We are also praying for our people, the brave first responders, and everyone else on the front line,” stated Vice President Lizer.

On Saturday, first responders began delivering care packages to residents of Chilchinbeto. Additional resources including coal, firewood, water, and other essential items are also arriving for local residents including the elderly and high-risk. “We want to let the Navajo Nation that we are here to help our Nation get through this time. We stand with you every step of the way. We will overcome this virus,” President Nez said.

In support of the order, the Navajo Police Department established community checkpoints to limit and inform travelers to stay home and discourage unnecessary traveling. Checkpoints have been established near the Chilchinbito area.

On Friday, President Nez and Vice President Lizer also approved a $4 million appropriation for the Navajo Department of Health to fight the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic on the Navajo Nation and deliver much-needed resources and equipment to health care experts and emergency response personnel on the ground. The funding will provide medical supplies, food and water supplies, equipment, public outreach, and more.

Navajo Police said, "In support of the order and to encourage our Navajo Nation communities, the Navajo Police Department is doing our part by establishing community checkpoints to limit and inform travelers to stay home and discourage unnecessary traveling."

Statement by Navajo Police Department

The Navajo Police Department has been working diligently in support of Navajo Public Health Order 2020-003, also referred to as the “Stay At Home” Order for the entire Navajo Nation.

In response to the health crisis of COVID-19 and with 14 confirmed cases, public health officials and Navajo Nation leadership have issued a stay at home order as part of a preventative measure to limit the exposure and spread of the Coronavirus.

In support of the order and to encourage our Navajo Nation communities, the Navajo Police Department is doing our part by establishing community checkpoints to limit and inform travelers to stay home and discourage unnecessary traveling.


Checkpoints have been established near the Chilchinbito area and we will continue to plan and coordinate with our NPD districts across the Navajo Nation.

We ask our community to adhere to the order and stay home. We relying greatly on your patience and understanding and want you to be safe. We ask that you keep the safety and health of you, your family, and your community in mind as we work together to combat COVID-19.

As first responders, we put ourselves on the frontline to ensure your safety, we ask for you to be patient and listen to the recommendations from our public health officials. Our officers will be wearing personal protective equipment at these checkpoints. We are keeping officer safety in mind and doing our part to ensure the safety of the entire Navajo Nation.

If you have an emergency, please call your district dispatch for assistance. If you have questions about COVID-19, please call the Navajo Division of Health Hotline at 928-871-7014.



The New York Times map today, Sunday, March 22, shows New York is the epicenter of the coronavirus in the U.S., with new spread of the coronavirus throughout the Southeast U.S., including north of New Orleans in Mississippi, and throughout Florida. A large number of cases are also in Colorado. California has a stay at home order. Updates at https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/world/coronavirus-maps.html


Global breaking news updates on coronavirus at New York Times

1 comment:

Ann susan said...

Many blessings on nation may great sporit protect people🌷🇨🇮

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