August 2020

Indigenous Peoples and Human Rights

Monday, November 30, 2015

Photos: France Solidarity with American Indians COP21









Thanks to our friend Christine Prat in France for sharing these photos from Paris, of the Committee in Solidarity with American Indians in France, shown with the Indigenous Environmental Network and other Indigenous and frontline activists.
The first is of people from CSIA, from left to right: Catherine Jekayumar, Edith Patrouilleau (vice-chairwoman), Pascal Gregis (who works for a radio), Sophie Gergaud (who organizes a Native American Film Festival) and Céline Planchou, member of the Committee, translator for the English speaking Native American visitors, and Chairman Sylvain Duez-Alessandrini.

Photos Indigenous in Paris COP21 Human Chain




Indigenous and frontline activists join Human Chain around Paris on Nov. 29, 2015
Photos by Indigenous Environmental Network
See more: https://www.flickr.com/photos/137923455@N03/sets/72157661694003571

Indigenous Peoples: UN Paris Accord could end up being a Crime against Humanity and Mother Earth

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World Climate Summit in Paris
Indigenous Peoples:
UN Paris Accord could end up being a Crime against Humanity and Mother Earth

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts:
Dallas Goldtooth +33 75 1413 823 USA: 708 515 6158 dallas@ienearth.org
Kandi Mossett +33 75 1414 195 mhawea@gmail.com

November 30, 2015 (Paris) – Indigenous Peoples from the Americas attending the United Nations World Climate Summit in Paris warn that the Paris climate accord will harm their rights, lands and environment and do nothing to address climate change.

“We are here in Paris to tell the world that not only will the anticipated Paris Accord not address climate change, it will make it worst because it will promote false solutions and not keep fossil fuels from being extracted and burned. The Paris COP21 is not about reaching a legally binding agreement on cutting greenhouse gases. In fact, the Paris Accord may turn out to be a crime against humanity and Mother Earth,” according to Tom Goldtooth, Executive Director of Indigenous Environmental Network based in Minnesota on Turtle Island also known as the United States. Goldtooth recently won the Gandhi Peace Award.

According to Crystal Lameman of the Beaver Lake Cree Nation, Alberta, Canada “After 21 years of these climate conferences, our First Nation wants to be hopeful this agreement truly stops a history of CO2lonialism and business-as-usual with expansion of fossil fuel exploitation on and near indigenous territories. We are here to protect, defend and renew our Mother Earth, not to rubber stamp an agreement that allows polluters to continue to burn the planet. False solutions such as carbon trading, carbon offsets, agrofuels and nuclear energy will probably be the basis of the Paris Accord and the so-called decarbonization of the global economy. False solutions to climate change instead of solving the climate crisis, are resulting in land grabs, human rights violations and will allow global warming to spiral out of control.” Lameman is featured in the film, “This Changes Everything” directed by Avi Lewis and based on the book by Naomi Klein.

Indigenous leaders throughout the world are particularly concerned about REDD (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation), a United Nations carbon offset mechanism that uses forests, agriculture and many other ecosystems as sponges for northern industrialized countries pollution instead of reducing emissions at source.

“Our world is melting. Climate change and global warming is a reality in my home,” says Allison Akootchook Warden from Kaktovik, a village in the Alaska arctic. “The failure of the United States, Canada and world leaders to take real action to address the climate crisis violates our rights. The draft Paris Accord is full of carbon market mechanisms that are already causing harm to the Indigenous Peoples of the Arctic Circle.”

Kandi Mossett, Tribal Citizen of the Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara Nations in North Dakota and campaigner with the Indigenous Environmental Network, whose home is surrounded by coal-fired power plants and inundated with fracking and flaring of natural gas states, “The current US Clean Power Plan allows the US to continue with carbon trading schemes such as REDD+ designed to allow more extraction and combustion of fossil fuels for a profit.  The whole concept is a false solution to the climate crisis because it allows the US to buy up “carbon credits” often on Indigenous lands in other countries while simultaneously destroying Indigenous homelands in the US essentially making us sacrifice zones for the good of the economy; Indigenous peoples are not expendable and will not sit idly by and allow this desecration to continue without a fight.”

According to the Global Alliance against REDD, “Instead of cutting CO2 and greenhouse gas emissions, the UN, the US, the EU, China, Norway and climate criminals like BP, Total, Shell, Chevron, Air France and BHP Billiton are pushing a false solution to climate change called REDD.”

According to Nnimmo Bassey, co-coordinator of the No REDD in Africa Network, “REDD may result in the largest land grab in history. It steals your future, lets polluters off the hook and is new form of colonialism. We demand that states and corporations stop privatizing nature!”


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Here are some photos of the It Takes Roots Delegation in the Human Chain Action on November 29th in Paris.


DEMOCRACY NOW! "If You're Not at the Table, You're on the Menu": Indigenous Activists Demand Role in Paris Climate Talks




Democracy Now interviews Indigenous Environmental Network in Paris

Watch coverage:
"If You're Not at the Table, You're on the Menu": Indigenous Activists Demand Role in Paris Climate Talks. This quote comes from Kandi Mossett, Hidatsa, Mandan and Arikara from North Dakota.
http://www.democracynow.org/2015/11/30/if_youre_not_at_the_table
Interview with Tom Goldtooth and Dallas Goldtooth:
http://www.democracynow.org/2015/11/30/indigenous_climate_activists_paris_police_state

Native Americans arrive in Paris: Climate solutions and Nature Tribunal

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Kandi Mossett offeres prayers in Paris today.
Indigenous and women's delegations arrive in Paris for COP21, with solutions, prepared for their Rights of Nature Tribunal
By Brenda Norrell
Censored News
updated Nov. 30, 2015
Native Americans from the United States have joined Indigenous Peoples from around the world with their prayers, and message of peace, at COP21, the United Nations Climate Summit, in Paris.
They have brought another message: “Leave it in the ground.” Native Americans have had enough of being the victims of dirty coal-fired power plants, oil and gas drilling, fracking and mineral mining.

Kandi Mossett, Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara from North Dakota, was among the first Native Americans in the Indigenous Environmental Network delegation to arrive.

Mossett, shown above in photo, said, "On November 29th the Indigenous Environmental Network organized a healing ceremony in front of the Bataclan theater just before thousands gathered to participate in a human chain action in the streets of Paris.

"It was a beautiful ceremony featuring Indigenous youth speakers from North America, the Arctic, and the Pacific Islands. Our delegations always see it as a necessity to have prayer before any large action. We offered kind words, song, and calls for climate justice and peace."

While the words climate change, may be vague for many, for Native Americans who have been the victims of the United States policy of a slow and toxic genocide, climate change means dirty coal-fired power plants, oil and gas drilling, fracking, toxic dumping, uranium mining, deforestation, poison rivers and exploitation.
On the Navajo Nation, Dine’ live with the strewn radioactive rocks from Cold War uranium mines, which their children play on. They breathe the dirty coal of Peabody’s Coal on Black Mesa, where Dine’ continue to resist relocation. They breathe the gases from the coal-fired Navajo Generating Station, which lights up Phoenix and Tucson, and pollution from two other coal-fired power plants, while many Dine' live without running water and electricity. Now, Dine’ live with the US EPA’s toxic gold mine release poisoning the San Juan River. It means traditional farmers watch their crops die.

In the nearby Pueblos, there is the same legacy of death from uranium mining, which has left its scars on the land and the people.
In North Dakota, the lands have been devastated by oil and gas drilling and fracking. Mossett is in Paris at COP21 to tell the story of her people. She is there for the children and future generations.
"This is COP21, how many more are you going to have?” asks Mossett, referring to the failure of the world’s leaders to make any substantial difference in the poisoning of the planet. She is among the frontline grassroots activists in the delegation from the Indigenous Environmental Network.
In South Dakota, Lakotas fight uranium mining and the poisoning of their scarce water. Throughout Indian country, Native Americans battle new schemes to steal their water, with backdoor political schemes known as “Indian water rights settlements.” Further, they battle the machinations of Arizona Sen. John McCain, who recently sneaked a land exchange into the defense bill which would turn sacred Apache land into a massive copper mine.
Now, women have risen to the forefront in climate justice.
In Paris, the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN International) is hosting a dynamic panel of Indigenous women speaking on climate change solutions in Paris on Sept. 7.
The International Rights of Nature Tribunal will meet in Paris December 4 --5. Hosted by the Global Alliance for the Right of Nature, the Tribunal is a citizen-created initiative that gives people from all around the world the opportunity to testify publicly on destruction of the Earth and their communities.
Back home, Indigenous People face violence in their homelands, as oil and gas and other temporary mine workers destabilize Native communities with drugs, sex crimes and violence. Meanwhile, globally -- from Guatemala and Peru to Brazil and throughout the Amazon -- mining companies continue to carry out assassinations, rapes and disappearances of Indigenous Peoples who oppose mining. These mining companies are primarily owned by Canadian and US corporations.
While global leaders with their bank accounts and posturing in Paris make the headlines, Indigenous Peoples are in Paris to tell the truth of the people.
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Shannon Biggs said, "Movement Rights: So proud to announce the release of our new report for the Paris climate talks! Edited by Shannon Biggs and Tom BK Goldtooth, this report, "Rights of Nature & Mother Earth: Sowing seeds of resistance, love and change." is a collaboration between Movement Rights Indigenous Environmental Network and Global Exchange. Providing both a critique of the UNFCCC process and an alternative system of environmental protection, the report includes contributions by Dr. Vandana Shiva (India), Maude Barlow (Canada), Pablo Solon (Bolivia), Alberto Acosta (Ecuador), Cormac Cullinan (South Africa) and many other luminaries. Please share and download here:" http://www.movementrights.org/resourc…/RONME-SowingSeeds.pdf
Read more:
Indigenous women WECAN in Paris
Indigenous Enviromental Network in Paris
http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2015/11/indigenous-environmental-network.html

‘Women Leading Solutions on the Frontlines of Climate Change – Paris’

December 7, 2015  - 13:00 to 18:30
Paris Marriott Opera Ambassador Hotel, 18 Boulevard Haussmann 75009 Paris 
Speakers to date include:
  • Vandana Shiva - World renowned activist, Founder of Navdanya Institute, India
  • Mary Robinson - President, Mary Robinson Foundation-Climate Justice and former President of Ireland
  • Patricia Gualinga - Indigenous Kichwa leader from Sarayaku, Ecuador
  • Josefina Skerk - Vice President of the Saami Parliament, Sweden
  • Fleur Newman - Programme Officer and UNFCCC Gender Focal Point representing the UNFCCC Secretariat, Germany
  • Gloria Ushigua - President of the Association of Sapara Women, Ecuador
  • Neema Namadamu - Director of SAFECO & WECAN DR Congo Coordinator, Democratic Republic of Congo
  • Casey Camp Horinek - Ponca Nation elder and representative of the Indigenous Environmental Network, USA
  • Aleta Baun - Conservationist & anti-mining activist of West Timor, Indonesia
  • Kandi Mossett - Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara Climate & Energy Campaign Organizer with the Indigenous Environmental Network, USA
  • Jacqueline Patterson - Director, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Environmental and Climate Justice Program, USA
  • Geneviève Azam - Scientific Council Member, Attac France
  • Eriel Deranger - Communications Manager of the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation, Canada
  • Angelina Galiteva – Founder, Renewables 100 Policy Institute, USA
  • Natalie Isaacs – CEO and co-Founder, 1 Million Women, Australia
  • Mary Louise Malig - Campaigns Coordinator and Research Associate with the Global Forest Coalition, Philippines
  • Thilmeeza Hussain - Founder of Voice of Women, Maldives
  • Naomi Ages - Climate Liability Project Lead, Greenpeace USA
  • UNFCCC Women & Gender Constituency Representative
  • Sally Ranney – co-Founder, Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network, USA
  • Osprey Orielle Lake - co-Founder and Executive Director, Women’s Earth & Climate Action Network, USA