Monday, January 26, 2015

Boarding School Tribunal releases findings and recommendations

Boarding School Tribunal 2014 by Brenda Norrell
Article and photos by Brenda Norrell
Censored News
Dutch translation by Alice Holemans, NAIS
French translation by Christine Prat

GREEN BAY, Wisconsin -- The Truth Commissioners of the Indigenous Peoples Boarding School Tribunal held here in October have released the findings and recommendations, following three days of testimony by those who survived abuse and torture in Indian boarding schools in the US and Canada. 

The abuse included kidnapping children from their homes and ripping away their language, culture and traditional religion. These boarding schools created generations of trauma for Native families. The exact number of Native children raped and murdered in these boarding schools is not known.

The Commissioners findings stated that the US government should implement the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in the US. Further, it was found that the US government should acknowledge the human rights violations, which occurred through the boarding schools established by the US government.

The US government should work for a new International Convention on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, collaborating with the Indigenous communities across the US and ratify the Convention on the Rights of the Child, Commissioners said.

The Commissioners recommended consultative status between the Indigenous communities and the US government. It was also recommended that the Convention on the Rights of the Child be ratified by sovereign, Indigenous nations throughout the United States.

The commissioners recommended that young people, youths to 25 year-olds, be involved in the process of truth-telling and remembrance. Elders were encouraged to not only share their boarding school experiences, but also their stories of resilience, courage, and drive to overcome the challenges they faced.

It was also recommended that a memorial date be set to honor and pay tribute to those individuals who were a part of the boarding schools and who faced discrimination, violence, and even death.

Oral history projects and similar Tribunals should be coordinated to gather stories of boarding school impacts in other Indigenous communities across the US. 

The findings include the need to publish a joint testimony including the stories from all Indigenous tribes in the US about the impact of boarding schools on their human rights.

Truth Commission Members were Fasoha (Maldives) , Aneeta Aahooja (Pakistan), Abalo Assih (Togo), Shiran Gooneratne (Sri Lanka), Athar Waheed (Pakistan), Kristi Rudelius-Palmer (University of Minnesota Human Rights Center.) It was organized by the Blue Skies Foundation. Live coverage was provided by Censored News, with livestream and video archives by Govinda at Earthcycles.

The complete statement is below:


BOARDING SCHOOLS TRIBUNAL
Truth Commissioners’ Summary Statement


We have found that the incidences testified to during the Indigenous Peoples’ Boarding Schools Tribunal held on October 22-24, 2014 violated, inter alia, the following articles of the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC):



Article 7 (Name & Nationality), Article 8 (Right to Preservation of Identity), Article 12 (Right to Participation), Article 13 (Freedom of Expression), Article 30 (Right to Cultural Identity), Article 5 (Right for Parental Guidance & Evolving Capacities), Article 9 (Freedom from Separation from Parents), Article 35 (Freedom from Forced Abduction), Article 6 (Right to Life, Survival & Development), Article 24 (Right to Health & Health Services), Article 25 (Right to Periodic Review of Placement), Article 39 (Right to Rehabilitative Care), Article 14 (Freedom of Thought, Conscience and Religion), Article 16 (Right to Correspondence & Privacy), Article 17 (Freedom of Information), Article 19 (Protection from Abuse & Neglect), Article 20 (Special Protection of Children under State Care), Article 34 (Protection from Sexual Exploitation), Article 36 (Freedom from other forms of Exploitation), Article 37 (Freedom from Torture & Cruel, Inhuman & Degrading Treatment or Punishment).


These violations are described in detail below.


In addition to these specific violations, overarching CRC articles, which were systematically violated include Article 2 (Discrimination), Article 3 (Best Interests of Child), Article 27 (Right to an Adequate Standard of Living), Article 28 & 29 (Right to Education), Article 31 (Right to Rest, Leisure, Recreation and Cultural Activities).


This Summary Statement is not an exclusive list of human rights violations that occurred due to the boarding school system. The violations listed below are only a partial accounting of the harm caused by boarding schools, which in no way limits the finding of additional violations in the future, either by us or by another body.  We were tremendously honored by the invitation to participate in this truth telling exercise and to present our reactions in a summary statement.  We submit this statement to the tribunal as a humble testament to the fact that we stand in solidarity with boarding school survivors and with Indigenous communities continuing to suffer the effects of the boarding school system.


RIGHT TO LANGUAGE AND IDENTITY. Witnesses described how children were prohibited from speaking their native language in boarding schools. Children were punished for speaking their own language and only allowed to use English. Additionally, children were given new names and clothing, further undermining, and shaming them for, their cultural identity. The style and length of the children’s hair was connected to their spiritual beliefs and customs; in boarding schools, their hair was cut as an act of punishment and an erasure of their spiritual traditions.  The children were denied the
right to their traditional beliefs and cultural practices, the right to their names and their tribal nationalities, and the right to participate freely in their own culture and society with their friends, family, and loved ones. (CRC, Article 7 (Name & Nationality), Article 8 (Right to Preservation of Identity), Article 12 (Right to Participation), Article 13 (Freedom of Expression), and Article 30 (Right to Cultural Identity)).


In fact, not only were these rights denied, but attempts were actively made by boarding school officials to destroy the children’s links with their culture and nationality. Children were shamed and punished for their cultural identity, their language, their religion, their clothing, their hair, and their names. They were taught that their very identities were bad and wrong, and that in order to be good and right they must no longer be Indigenous. Witness testimony linked this breaking down of culture and systematic shaming and abuse to the high suicide rate and the addiction epidemics that have plagued Indigenous communities.


RIGHT TO FAMILY. Witnesses testified to a policy of encouraging the forced sterilization of Indigenous women to limit the reproductive rights of Indigenous families. This policy existed in concert with and alongside the policy of sending Indigenous children to boarding schools.


Through the boarding school system, children were removed from their parents’ guardianship and care, sometimes explicitly against their parents’ wishes.  Even where the consent of parents appeared to be present, the environment of force and coercion present on the reservations rendered this consent in actuality non-existent. Children were denied access to their parents and parents were not able to bond with their children and develop their parenting skills. Siblings were also not allowed to speak with one another at the boarding schools. Children were encouraged to practice violent behavior against each other in the boarding schools, in an attempt to destroy peer relationships. Subsequently, future generations of Indigenous children were affected because of the physical and psychological impacts of the boarding school experiences on their elders.


Violence was institutionalized in boarding schools. Children were taught that violence against children was the norm, and even that it was positive and accepted. Instead of parenting skills, boarding school students were taught to abuse their own children, thus perpetuating this cycle of violence and inter-generational trauma. A number of witnesses testified to their hard work in learning parenting skills, abandoning the violence forced on them at boarding schools, and breaking the cycle of abuse. These witnesses should be commended for their struggle in the face of institutionalized abuse and violence.  Unfortunately, though some boarding school survivors were able to begin healing themselves and their families, the inter-generational trauma of the boarding schools continues to claim casualties, as demonstrated by the high suicide and addiction rates in Indigenous communities as noted above. (CRC, Article 5 (Right for Parental Guidance & Evolving Capacities), Article 9 (Freedom from Separation from
Parents), Article 35 (Freedom from Forced Abduction)).
RIGHT TO SURVIVAL AND DEVELOPMENT & RIGHT TO HEALTH. Children were not provided adequate food and access to health services for their full development. (CRC, Article 6 (Right to Life, Survival & Development), Article 24 (Right to Health & Health Services), Article 25 (Right to Periodic Review of Placement), Article 39 (Right to Rehabilitative Care)).


FREEDOM OF RELIGION OR BELIEF. Children were forced to be baptized and to participate in and perform religious activities that were not of their own backgrounds. They were deprived of the right to participate in their own spiritual ceremonies.  (CRC, Article 14 (Freedom of Thought, Conscience and Religion)).


PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE. Testimonies revealed that school officials interfered with private correspondence between family and the children creating rifts between families and breaking family bonds, adding to the psychological, physical, and spiritual abuse of children. Children’s identity papers were taken and did not know how to return home. Children could be moved from one boarding school to another without parental consent. (CRC, Article 16 (Right to Correspondence & Privacy), Article 17 (Freedom of Information)).


CORPORAL PUNISHMENT, ABUSE, AND EXPLOITATION. From the many testimonies that were presented during the tribunal, it was clear that many of the children who went to boarding schools faced different forms of corporal punishment. Children were sent to boarding schools at a very young age. It was noted that children were made to do physical work that was not appropriate for their ages. Where children went together with their siblings, it was found that schools made an effort to keep siblings apart, further inflicting mental trauma and abuse. Apart from the corporal punishment, from a number of testimonies it can be concluded that many children were sexually abused as well in the boarding schools.  (CRC, Article 19 (Protection from Abuse & Neglect), Article 20 (Special Protection of Children under State Care), Article 34 (Protection from Sexual Exploitation), Article 36 (Freedom from other forms of Exploitation), Article 37 (Freedom from Torture & Cruel, Inhuman & Degrading Treatment or Punishment)).


RECOMMENDATIONS:


Indigenous Peoples
Engage youth to 25 year-olds in the process of truth telling and remembrance


Encourage elders to not only share their boarding school experiences, but also their stories of resilience, courage, and drive to overcome the challenges they faced.


Set a memorial date to honor and pay tribute to those individuals who were a part of
the boarding schools and who faced discrimination, violence, and even death.


Coordinate oral history projects and similar Tribunals to gather stories of boarding school impacts in other Indigenous communities across the US.
Publish a joint testimony including the stories from all Indigenous tribes in the US about the impact of boarding schools on their human rights.


Begin a consultative status between the Indigenous communities and the US government.


Encourage the ratification of the Convention on the Rights of the Child by sovereign, Indigenous nations throughout the United States.


US Government
Acknowledge the human rights violations, which occurred through the boarding schools established by the US Government.


Implement the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in the US.


Work for a new International Convention on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, collaborating with the Indigenous communities across the US.


Ratify the Convention on the Rights of the Child.


Truth Commission Members: Fasoha (Maldives) , Aneeta Aahooja (Pakistan), Abalo Assih (Togo), Shiran Gooneratne (Sri Lanka), Athar Waheed (Pakistan), Kristi Rudelius-Palmer (University of Minnesota Human Rights Center)


Please share our link from Censored News
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2015/01/boarding-school-tribunal-releases.html

Home » Nieuws » * KOSTSCHOLENTRIBUNAAL GEEFT BEVINDINGEN EN AANBEVELINGEN VRIJ.
* KOSTSCHOLENTRIBUNAAL GEEFT BEVINDINGEN EN AANBEVELINGEN VRIJ.
Door Brenda Norrell: www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com
Vertaald door NAIS: www.denaisgazet.be
Foto's: Brenda Norrell
tribunaalbev1.jpg
Green Bay, Wisconsin- The Truth Commissioners of the Indigenous Peoples Boarding School Tribunaldat hier in oktober gehouden werd heeft na de drie- daagse getuigenissen van overlevenden van misbruik en folteringen in de kostscholen van Canada en US aanhoort te hebben, zijn bevindingen en aanbevelingen vrijgegeven.

Het misbruik omvatte de ontvoeringen van de kinderen, het verbieden van hun taal, cultuur en traditionele religie. Deze kostscholen creëerden generaties van trauma voor Native families. Het exacte aantal indiaanse kinderen die verkracht en vermoord werden in deze kostscholen is niet gekend.

De Commissieleden stellen in hun bevindingen dat de VS regering de Verklaring over de Rechten van Inheemse volken moet toepassen in de VS.
Verder dat de VS regering de mensenrechten schendingen die plaats hadden in de regeringscholen moet erkennen.

De VS regering moet werken aan een nieuwe internationale conventie over de rechten van inheemse volken, samenwerken met de inheemse gemeenschappen doorheen de Verenigde Staten en de conventie over de rechten van het kind bekrachtigen.

De commissieleden adviseren consultatieve status tussen de inheemse gemeenschappen en de VS regering.
Het is ook aanbevolen dat de conventie over de rechten van het kind bekrachtigd wordt door soevereine inheemse naties doorheen de Verenigde staten.

De commissieleden raden aan dat jongeren, tot ong.25 jaar oud, betrokken worden in het proces van de waarheid -horen en herinnering. Ouderen worden aangeraden niet enkel hun kostschool -ervaringen te delen, maar ook de verhalen van hun veerkracht, moed en gedrevenheid om moeilijkheden te overwinnen.

Het werd ook aangeraden dat een Memorial -datum zal worden vastgelegd om eer te bewijzen aan hen die in de kostscholen discriminatie, geweld en zelfs dood hebben ondervonden.

Mondelinge geschiedenisprojecten en soortgelijke tribunalen zouden moeten georganiseerd worden om de verhalen over de impact van de kostscholen , in andere inheemse gemeenschappen doorheen de VS, vast te leggen.

De bevindingen bevatten de noodzaak om een gezamenlijke getuigenis van alle inheemse tribes in de US te publiceren- over de impact van kostscholen op hun mensenrechten
tribunaalbev2.jpg
Truth Commission Members waren:
Fasoha (Maldives) , Aneeta Aahooja (Pakistan), Abalo Assih (Togo), Shiran Gooneratne (Sri Lanka), Athar Waheed (Pakistan), Kristi Rudelius-Palmer (University of Minnesota Human Rights Center.)
It was organized by the Blue Skies Foundation.
Live coverage was provided by Censored News, with livestream and video archives by Govinda at Earthcycles.

BOARDING SCHOOLS TRIBUNAL
Truth Commissioners’ Summary Statement



Par Brenda Norrell
Censored News
26 janvier 2015
Traduction Christine Prat

GREEN BAY, Wisconsin – La Commission Vérité du Tribunal sur les Pensionnats pour Autochtones, qui s’est tenu ici en octobre dernier, a publié ses conclusions et recommandations, suite à trois jours de témoignages par ceux qui ont survécu aux sévices et à la torture dans les Pensionnats Indiens des Etats-Unis et du Canada.
Parmi les actes de maltraitance, on relève le fait que des enfants étaient kidnappés de chez eux et qu’on extirpait leur langue, leur culture et leur religion traditionnelle. Ces pensionnats ont créé des générations de traumatismes dans les familles Autochtones. Le nombre exact d’enfants Autochtones violés et assassinés dans ces pensionnats est inconnu.
Dans leurs conclusions les membres de la Commission déclarent que le gouvernement des Etats-Unis devrait appliquer la Déclaration des Droits des Peuples Autochtones aux Etats-Unis. De plus, ils estiment que le gouvernement des Etats-Unis devrait reconnaître les violations des droits de l’homme qui se sont produites dans des pensionnats établis par le gouvernement des Etats-Unis.
Les membres de la Commission ont dit que le gouvernement des Etats-Unis devrait travailler à une nouvelle Convention Internationale sur les Droits des Peuples Autochtones, en collaboration avec toutes les communautés Autochtones des Etats-Unis, et ratifier la Convention sur les Droits de l’Enfant.
Les membres de la Commission ont recommandé un statut consultatif entre les communautés Autochtones et le gouvernement des Etats-Unis. Il a également été recommandé que la Convention sur les Droits de l’Enfant soit ratifiée par les Nations Autochtones Souveraines dans tous les Etats-Unis.
Les membres de la Commission ont recommandé que les jeunes, jusqu’à 25 ans, soient impliqués dans le processus d’énonciation de la vérité et du souvenir. Les Anciens ont été encouragés à non seulement partager leurs expériences dans les pensionnats, mais à parler aussi de leur résilience, de leur courage et de la force qui les a poussés à surmonter les défis auxquels ils ont fait face.
Il a aussi été recommandé qu’une date de commémoration soit fixée, pour honorer et rendre hommage aux individus qui sont allés dans les pensionnats et ont subi la discrimination, la violence et même la mort.
Des projets d’histoire orale et d’autres Tribunaux similaires devraient être coordonnés pour rassembler des récits d’impact des pensionnats sur d’autres communautés Autochtones à travers les Etats-Unis.
Les conclusions indiquent aussi la nécessité de publier un témoignage commun comprenant les histoires de toutes les tribus Autochtones des Etats-Unis sur l’impact des pensionnats sur leurs droits humains.
Les Membres de la Commission de Vérité étaient : Fasoha (Maldives), Aneeta Aahooja (Pakistan), Abalo Assih (Togo), Shiran Gooneratne (Sri Lanka), Athar Waheed (Pakistan), Kristi Rudelius-Palmer (Université du Minnesota, Centre des Droits de l’Homme). C’était organisé par la Fondation Blue Skies. Le reportage en direct a été fait par Censored News, avec une diffusion en direct et des archives vidéo par Govinda de Earthcycles.
Photo Brenda Norrell, Censored News

Ci-dessous, la déclaration des membres de la Commission Vérité :

TRIBUNAL SUR LES PENSIONNATS
Déclaration Récapitulative des Membres de la Commission Vérité
Nous avons trouvé que les incidents relatés devant le Tribunal sur les Pensionnats pour les Autochtones qui s’est tenu du 22 au 24 octobre 2014, représentaient des violations, inter alia, des articles suivants de la Convention sur les Droits de l’Enfance :
Article 7 (Nom et Nationalité), Article 8 (Droit à la Préservation de l’Identité), Article 12 (Droit à la Participation), Article 13 (Liberté d’Expression), Article 30 (Droit à l’Identité Culturelle), Article 5 (Droit à la Guidance Parentale et au Développement des Capacités), Article 9 (Liberté de (non) Séparation des Parents), Article 35 (Liberté de non-Abduction Forcée), Article 6 (Droit à la Vie, à la Survie et au Développement), Article 24 (Droit à la Santé et aux Services de Santé), Article 25 (Droit à un Contrôle Périodique du Placement), Article 39 (Droits aux Soins Réparateurs), Article 14 (Liberté de Pensée, de Conscience et de Religion), Article 16 (Droit à la Correspondance et à la Vie Privée), Article 17 (Liberté d’Information), Article 19 (Protection contre les Sévices et la Négligence), Article 20 (Protection Spéciale des Enfants sous la Tutelle de l’Etat), Article 34 (Protection contre l’Exploitation Sexuelle), Article 36 (Protection contre d’autres formes d’Exploitation), Article 37 (Liberté de ne pas subir la Torture et des Châtiments Cruels, Inhumains et Dégradants).
Ces violations sont décrites en détail plus bas.
En plus de ces violations spécifiques, des articles fondamentaux de la Convention sur les Droits de l’Enfance, sujets à des violations systématiques, concernent l’Article 2 (Discrimination), l’Article 3 (l’Intérêt Supérieur de l’Enfant), l’Article 27 (Droit à un Niveau de Vie Décent), les Articles 28 et 29 (Droit à l’Education), l’Article 31 (Droit au Repos, aux Loisirs, à la Récréation et aux Activités Culturelles).
Cette Déclaration Récapitulative ne constitue pas une liste exhaustive des violations des Droits de l’Homme causées par le système des pensionnats. Les violations énumérées ci-dessous ne sont qu’un compte-rendu partiel du mal causé par les pensionnats, et ne limitent en aucun cas l’exposition d’autres violations dans le futur, que ce soit par nous ou par une autre instance. Nous avons été extrêmement honorés par l’invitation de participer à cet exercice de la vérité et de présenter nos réactions dans une déclaration récapitulative. Nous soumettons cette déclaration au tribunal comme un humble testament du fait que nous sommes solidaires des survivants des pensionnats et des communautés Autochtones qui continuent à souffrir des effets du système des pensionnats.
DROIT A LA LANGUE ET L’IDENTITE. Les témoins ont raconté comment on interdisait aux enfants de parler leur langue autochtone dans les pensionnats. Les enfants étaient punis pour parler leur propre langue et n’étaient autorisés à utiliser que l’anglais. De plus, on leur donnait de nouveaux noms et vêtements, pour détruire d’avantage leur identité culturelle, et les amener à en avoir honte. La coiffure et la longueur des cheveux des enfants étaient liées à leurs croyances spirituelles et leurs coutumes ; dans les pensionnats, leurs cheveux étaient coupés pour les punir et éradiquer leurs traditions spirituelles. Les enfants étaient privés du droit à leurs croyances traditionnelles et à leurs pratiques culturelles, du droit à leurs noms et à leurs nationalités tribales et du droit à participer librement à leur propre culture et à leur société avec leurs amis, leurs familles et les êtres chers. (Convention sur les Droits de l’Enfance, Article 7 – Nom et Nationalité, Article 8 – Droit à la Préservation de l’Identité, Article 12 – Droit de Participer, Article 13 – Liberté d’Expression, et Article 30 – Droit à l’Identité Culturelle).
En fait, non seulement ces droits étaient niés, mais il y avait des tentatives actives de la part des officiels des écoles pour détruire le lien des enfants avec leur culture et leur nationalité. On faisait honte aux enfants et on les punissait pour leur identité culturelle, leur langue, leur religion, leurs vêtements, leurs cheveux et leurs noms. On leur apprenait que leurs identités mêmes étaient mauvaises et erronées, et que pour être bon et dans le vrai, ils devaient cesser d’être Autochtones. Des témoins ont fait le lien entre cette démolition de la culture et la honte et l’injure systématiques et les forts taux de suicide et d’addictions qui ont ravagé les communautés Autochtones.
DROIT A UNE FAMILLE. Des témoins ont décrit une politique de stérilisation forcée de femmes Autochtones pour limiter les droits à la reproduction des familles Autochtones. Cette politique a existé de concert et parallèlement à la politique consistant à envoyer les enfants Autochtones dans des pensionnats.
Par le système des pensionnats, les enfants étaient retirés à la garde et aux soins de leurs parents, parfois explicitement à l’encontre de la volonté de leurs parents. Même lorsqu’il semblait qu’il y ait eu accord des parents, l’environnement de coercition et d’usage de la force dans les réserves rendait ce consentement en réalité non-existent. Il était interdit aux enfants d’avoir des contacts avec leurs parents et les parents n’avaient pas la possibilité d’établir un lien avec leurs enfants et de développer leurs capacités de parents. De plus, des frères et sœurs n’étaient pas autorisés à se parler dans les pensionnats. Les enfants étaient encouragés à se conduire violemment entre eux, dans les pensionnats, dans une tentative de détruire les relations de solidarité entre eux. En conséquence, des générations suivantes d’enfants Autochtones ont été affectées par les impacts physiques et psychologiques de ce qu’avaient subi leurs aînés dans les pensionnats.
La violence était institutionnalisée dans les pensionnats. On apprenait aux enfants que la violence contre les enfants était la norme, et même que c’était positif et accepté. Au lieu des qualités de bons parents, les élèves des pensionnats apprenaient à brutaliser leurs propres enfants, perpétuant ainsi ce cycle de violence et de traumatisme intergénérationnel. Certains témoins ont parlé de leur dure tâche pour apprendre à être de bons parents, abandonnant la violence qui leur avait été imposée dans les pensionnats, brisant ainsi le cycle des sévices. Ces témoins devraient être cités en exemple pour leur lutte contre la violence et les sévices institutionnalisés. Malheureusement, bien que des survivants des pensionnats aient été capables de se guérir eux-mêmes et leurs familles, le traumatisme intergénérationnel des pensionnats continue à faire des victimes, comme le démontre les forts taux de suicide et d’addictions dans les communautés Autochtones, comme il a été dit plus haut. (Convention sur les Droits de l’Enfance, Article 5 – Responsabilité des Parents et Possibilités de Développement, Article 9 – Liberté de [non] Séparation d’avec les Parents, Article 35 – Liberté de non-Abduction Forcée).
DROIT A LA SURVIE ET AU DEVELOPPEMENT & DROIT A LA SANTE. Les enfants ne recevaient pas de nourriture adéquate ni d’accès aux services de santé pour garantir leur développement complet. (Convention sur les Droits de l’Enfance, Article 6 – Droit à la vie, la Survie et le Développement, Article 24 – Droit à la Santé et aux Services de Santé, Article 25 – Droit au Contrôle Périodique du Placement, Article 39 – Droit aux Soins Réparateurs).
DROIT DE RELIGION OU DE CROYANCE. Les enfants étaient baptisés de force et obligés de participer et d’effectuer des activités religieuses qui ne venaient pas de leur origine. Ils étaient privés du droit de participer à leurs propres cérémonies spirituelles. (Convention sur les Droits de l’Enfance, Article 14 – Liberté de Pensée, de Conscience et de Religion).
CORRESPONDANCE PRIVEE. Des témoignages ont révélé que les officiels des écoles se mêlaient de la correspondance privée entre la famille et les enfants, créant des déchirements entre les familles et brisant les liens familiaux, ajoutant encore aux chocs psychologiques, physiques et spirituels subis par les enfants. Les papiers d’identité des enfants étaient saisis et ils ne savaient pas comment retourner chez eux. Les enfants pouvaient être transférés d’un pensionnat à un autre sans le consentement des parents. (Convention sur les Droits de l’Enfance, Article 16 – Droit à la Correspondance et la Vie Privée, Article 17 – Liberté d’Information).
CHATIMENTS CORPORELS, SEVICES ET EXPLOITATION. D’après les nombreux témoignages présentés au Tribunal, il est clair que beaucoup d’enfants des pensionnats subissaient différentes formes de châtiments corporels. Les enfants étaient envoyés dans des pensionnats à un très jeune âge. Il a été noté que les enfants devaient effectuer des travaux physiques inappropriés à leur âge. Là où les enfants étaient amenés avec leurs frères et sœurs, il est apparu que les écoles s’efforçaient de les séparer, leur infligeant ainsi un traumatisme mental supplémentaire. A part les châtiments corporels, un certain nombre de témoignages permettent de conclure que beaucoup d’enfants ont été abusés sexuellement dans les pensionnats. (Convention sur les Droits de l’Enfance, Article 19 – Protection contre les Sévices et la Négligence, Article 20 – Protection Spéciale des Enfants sous Tutelle de l’Etat, Article 34 – Protection contre l’Exploitation Sexuelle, Article 36 – Protection contre les autres formes d’Exploitation, Article 37 – Protection contre la Torture et les Traitements ou Punitions Cruels, Inhumains et Dégradants).

RECOMMANDATIONS
Que :
Les Peuples Autochtones
Impliquent les jeunes de moins de 25 ans dans le processus de révélation de la vérité et le souvenir
Encouragent les anciens à ne pas seulement raconter leurs expériences dans les pensionnats, mais à parler aussi de leur résilience, de leur courage et de leur force de surmonter les défis auxquels ils étaient confrontés
Fixent une date commémorative pour honorer et rendre hommage aux individus qui ont été dans les pensionnats et ont fait face à la discrimination, la violence et même la mort
Coordonnent des projets d’histoire orale et des Tribunaux similaires pour rassembler des histoires sur les impacts des pensionnats dans d’autres communautés Autochtones des Etats-Unis
Publient un témoignage commun incluant les histoires de toutes les tribus Autochtones des Etats-Unis sur les effets des pensionnats sur leurs droits humains
Mettent en place un statut consultatif entre les communautés Autochtones et le gouvernement des Etats-Unis
Encouragent la ratification de la Convention des Droits de l’Enfance par les Nations Autochtones Souveraines dans tous les Etats-Unis
Le Gouvernement des Etats-Unis
Reconnaisse les violations des droits de l’homme qui ont eu lieu par le fait des pensionnats établis par le Gouvernement des Etats-Unis
Applique la Déclaration des Droits des Peuples Autochtones aux Etats-Unis
Travaille à une nouvelle Convention Internationale sur les Droits des Peuples Autochtones, en collaboration avec les communautés Autochtones des Etats-Unis
Ratifie la Convention sur les Droits de l’Enfance
Les Membres de la Commission Vérité : Fasoha (Maldives), Aneeta Aahooja (Pakistan), Abalo Assih (Togo), Shiran Gooneratne (Sri Lanka), Athar Waheed (Pakistan), Kristi Rudelius-Palmer (Université du Minnesota, Centre des Droits de l’Homme)

1 comment:

kimWSSmith said...

This rampant racist mentality started when Columbus returned to the new world with the jews. We see it in the daily news propaganda; after Nazi Israel murders innocent Palestinian children in "self defense". The native population in the northern hemisphere was estimated to be approximately 50 million, by the end of the 19th century; the native population had dropped to less than 500,000. I am not native American, however: I recognize the intent was GENOCIDE. Their current genocidal rampage is against the Palestinian people. Their sole reason for wholesale murder is because their victims are not jewish.

Censored News PayPal


Thanks for reading Censored News for the past 10 years! I've depleted all my funds to keep Censored News going. Please donate to help provide Internet access for Censored News! Censored News has no advertising, grants or sponsors, and depends on reader donations! Thank you! Brenda Norrell, PMB 132, 405 E Wetmore Rd, Ste 117, Tucson, Ariz. 85705 brendanorrell@gmail.com