August 2020

Indigenous Peoples and Human Rights

Saturday, July 18, 2020

Dineh Philmer Bluehouse 'The pandemic is a time of paradigm shift, signals need for peace and balance'



Dineh Philmer Bluehouse 'The pandemic is a time of paradigm shift, signals need for peace and balance'

By Brenda Norrell
Censored News

Dine' Phil Bluehouse says this pandemic is a time of a paradigm shift for society and Dine' have the narratives to bring about peace and balance.

Bluehouse, who developed the Peacemaker program, speaks of the need for peace, unity and healing. Serving in the healing process, Bluehouse does not refer to himself as a medicine man. He said his role in healing is to lead people to find their own healing and peace.

Speaking of the Hozhooji Nanitiin (Dine’ traditional teachings) Bluehouse said the Dine’ way of good health and well-being is the way of balance and peace.

“We are going through a paradigm shift. Humanity is going to have difficulties from here on out. There is going to be a lot of suffering," Bluehouse said in an interview with Censored News.

Quitobaquito Spring in danger: Border wall construction depleting sacred Tohono O'odham spring, home to endangered species

"It is with a heavy heart that I share this photo taken today of Quitobaquito. The spring is drying up. It has never been this low. Wall workers are currently trenching nearby for the lights that will go on the 30' border wall. This sacred place, this life-giving spring of the O'odham is being desecrated." -- Ajo resident. (Photos copyright by the photographer. Used with permission by Censored News.)

Laiken Jordahl of the Center for Biological Diversity said, "Quitobaquito Springs, a stunning oasis sacred to the O'odham and home to two endangered species, is drying up. The Department of Homeland Security is siphoning millions of gallons of groundwater and digging trenches for wall construction while refusing to complete any environmental analysis."

Quitobaquito Spring in danger: Border wall construction depleting sacred Tohono O'odham spring, home to endangered species






By Brenda Norrell
Censored News

The construction of the U.S. Border Wall is depleting the water from the Quitobaquito Spring, sacred since time immemorial to Tohono O'odham. The spring nourishes two endangered species found nowhere else in the world, the Sonoyta mud turtle and Quitobaquito pupfish.

The Trump administration is proceeding with the construction of the border wall in violation of all federal laws protecting Native American sacred sites, endangered species and those that protect the land, water and air, and depleting the scarce water sources in the Sonoran Desert.

"The spring is drying up. It has never been this low. Wall workers are currently trenching nearby for the lights that will go on the 30-foot border wall. This sacred place, this life-giving spring of the O'odham is being desecrated," an Ajo resident said.

Border wall construction has been depleting groundwater for spraying to tamp dust, and for mixing concrete for footings.

Private security at Organ Pipe Cactus Monument