August 2020

Indigenous Peoples and Human Rights

Tuesday, July 13, 2021

Indigenous Rights Defenders Battle to Their Deaths in Mexico


Simon Perez, David Valdez, Tomas Rojo, Luis Urbano

Indigenous Rights Defenders Battle to Their Deaths in Mexico

By Brenda Norrell
Censored News

MEXICO CITY —  Indigenous Rights Defender Simón Pedro Pérez López, Tzeltal, was murdered by a gunman on a motorcycle in southern Mexico. Simon was the fourth well-known Indigenous rights defender to be assassinated in Mexico since May.

Simon was gunned down outside a market in Simojovel, a town in Chiapas state, on July 5. He was known better as Simón Pedro and had been active in a social justice organization born out of the 1998 massacre of 45 Indigenous people in the nearby town of Acteal.

Simon, shown on the screen, was honored in Paris, as the Zapatistas delegation arrived in Paris this week. Simon was assassinated in Chiapas on July 5, 2021.

Mohawk Nation News 'Native Women to Sign Administrative Death Warrants'

 

Water Protectors and Journalist Celebrate Victory: All Charges Dropped for Bayou Bridge Pipeline Protests



Local District Attorney Rejects All Criminal Charges for Alleged Violations of ALEC-inspired Anti-Protest Amendments to Critical Infrastructure Law


By Center for Constitutional Rights

press@ccrjustice.org

Censored News

MARTINVILLE, Louisiana – Sixteen pipeline protesters and a journalist who had been arrested and charged with felonies in 2018 celebrated a major victory for the First Amendment after a local district attorney in Louisiana rejected all charges and vowed not to prosecute them under Louisiana’s controversial amendments to its critical infrastructure law.

In 2018, in the midst of fierce opposition to the Bayou Bridge Pipeline and at the urging of the Louisiana Mid-Continent Oil and Gas Association, the Louisiana legislature added pipelines to the definition of critical infrastructure to significantly heighten the penalties for people protesting pipeline projects. The amendments made it a felony punishable by up to five years in prison, with or without hard labor, for being on or near pipelines or construction sites allegedly without permission. The Bayou Bridge Pipeline, built by Energy Transfer Partners, is the tail end of the same network of pipelines that includes the Dakota Access Pipeline.