Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Cree block highway in protest of Harper legislation




The Cree of Maskwacis held a pipe ceremony and peaceful demonstration on Hwy 2A at Maskwacis.
 'We are taking this opportunity, coinciding with 12th hour of the 12th day of December 2012, to bring awareness to First Nations’ opposition to legislation proposed by the Harper government.'
Photo by Samson Cree Nation.
Cree block highway
The Samson Cree Nation issued a statement Tuesday saying the blockade of provincial Hwy 2A
“Pipes will be lifted in support of IdleNoMore,” said the statement. “The presence of the pipe signifies the pipe laws of gentleness, compassion and mutual respect.”
On Monday, thousands of people across the country took to the streets in support of Indigenous rights under the banner of IdleNoMore. The next day, on Tuesday, Spence began her hunger strike in Ottawa which she says will continue until Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Queen Elizabeth II agree to a treaty meeting with First Nations leaders.
“We are taking this opportunity, coinciding with the 12th hour of the 12th day of December 2012, to bring awareness to First Nations’ opposition to legislation proposed by the Harper government,” said the statement, posted on the band’s website. “We also want people to bring attention to the hunger strike started by Chief Theresa Spence.”
The statement said the Harper government is pushing a number of pieces of legislation that “directly undermines First Nations’ right of self-determination.”
Samson Cree Nation is about 97 kilometres south of Edmonton.
--APTN

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