August 2020

Indigenous Peoples and Human Rights

Thursday, October 5, 2017

Dr. Larry Emerson Journeys to Spirit World



Gentle Giant, Scholar and Earth Defender Larry Emerson Passes to Spirit World

By Brenda Norrell
Censored News

Our friend Larry Emerson, Dineh, gentle giant, farmer, scholar and Earth Defender passed to the Spirit World. John Redhouse, Dineh, said in tribute to Larry Emerson, "Larry was our Navajo National Treasure. We have indeed lost a great man—intellectually, spiritually culturally, in every way. With his loss, our lives in this world, Fourth World, will never be the same."
Six years ago, Larry sent this wish list to Censored News. Larry, always ahead of his time, urged the Navajo Nation to adopt the Rights of the Natural World.
Among his wishes were headlines that he would like to see, including this one: "Navajo Nation adopts democratic measures to include rights of the Natural World. Opening clause reads: 'We, the People and the Natural World…'
"Navajo communities agreed that ancient Indigenous knowledge regarding harmony, beauty, happiness, peace and balance were the real imperatives that sustain a healthy democracy." -- Larry Emerson, 2011.

Shiprock Memorial to be held on Oct. 8, 2017

Larry Waldo Emerson, age 70, passed away August 19, 2017, at his home
at Tse Daa Kaan, New Mexico. He was Tse’nahabil nii doo To’ ‘needlinii, He was
born on July 19, 1947 at Rehoboth, New Mexico. Larry was a scholar and social
activist concerned with language revitalization, environmental issues,
decolonization, and healing with Diné traditions. Larry completed his
undergraduate work at Fort Lewis College and the University of New
Mexico and earned a PhD from San Diego State University. As a veteran
he had been based at Seoul, Korea.

Larry was preceded in death by his parents, Waldo and Grace Martin
Emerson and his sisters Patsy W. Emerson and Carol Ann Weahkee. He is
survived by his son, Marc Aaron Emerson; his sisters, Gloria J.
Emerson and Elayne G. Lowe and husband, Art Lowe; Larry's nieces and
nephews Laurie Ann Shirakawa, Sonny Weahkee, Bryan Banyacya, and Sean
Lowe; and many beloved aunts, cousins, grandchildren, and great
grandchildren.

Dr. Larry Emerson lectured widely at institutions of higher learning
in California, Oklahoma, Illinois, and New Mexico and held seminars at
his farm at Tse Daa Kaan. At the time of his death Emerson was
collaborating with Diné College faculty member Herbert Benally on
topics related to Navajo philosophy and healing. He also collaborated
with many other scholars, youth groups, and community action groups
for wellness.
(Published in Navajo Times)

Shiprock Memorial Oct. 8, 2017


THE FAMILY AND COLLEAGUES OF THE LATE DR. LARRY EMERSON WILL BE HAVING A MEMORIAL EVENT IN HIS HONOR ON SUNDAY OCTOBER 08, 2017 FROM 9AM TO 2PM AT THE SHIPROCK CHAPTER HOUSE. WE ARE INVITING FAMILY AND FRIENDS OF LARRY TO COME CELEBRATE LARRY’S LIFE, TO SHARE STORIES, SONGS AND MUSIC. TO COMPLETE OUR CELEBRATION WE WILL HAVE A POTLUCK DINNER, YOU ARE WELCOMED TO BRING FOOD TO SHARE. EMAIL JANENE YAZZIE AT Janene.y@sixth-world.com OR CHILI YAZZIE AT chili_yazzie@hotmail.com FOR QUESTIONS.


Larry Emerson, always ahead of his time, wrote this wish list in 2011, which included his wish list that the Navajo Nation adopt the Rights of the Natural World, and set new principles for self-governance, healing and transformation

By Larry W. Emerson
Censored News

http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com

Dine' farmer and scholar Larry W. Emerson shares his wishlist for 2011 with Censored News. "It is a wishful thinking - and I hope thought provoking - article regarding five Indian news headlines I'd like to read in 2011," Emerson said. He is a farmer, artist, activist, and scholar.

Five Navajo Times headlines I'd like to read in 2011

1. Navajo Nation Council sets new principles for self-governance: healing, decolonization, transformation and mobilization. Leaders agreed that the days of blind-faith assimilation and modern world seductions regarding power, greed, control, conquest and egotism were the true evils of colonialized Navajo self governance. In a related action, leaders agreed to restore the sacred circle and to reject the unhealthy political hierarchy copied from western politicians and bureaucrats.

2. Navajo Nation adopts democratic measures to include rights of the Natural World. Opening clause reads: “We, the People and the Natural World…” Navajo communities agreed that ancient Indigenous knowledge regarding harmony, beauty, happiness, peace and balance were the real imperatives that sustain a healthy democracy.

3. Navajo Nation adopts principles of hozho and k’é as the truest measures of family, clan and community sustainability. The new Navajo leadership declared that colonization was destructive and useless to contemporary Navajo society. The new Council also rejected notions of the American dream if it means more fossil fuel burning, more environmental degradation, more environmental refugees, more water shortages, & more exploitation. ”The ‘Dream’ is really a self-destructive candle burning at both ends and a terrible nightmare,” the leaders declared. “One can squeeze just so much juice from an orange and the Navajo Nation refuses to participate in ecocide of this sort.”

4. Chapter governments agree to collaborate under new districting system. In a historic set of local meetings, the Navajo people elected to begin formal collaboration between communities by restoring and regenerating age-old principles of identity, place, kinship, community, respect and generosity. Chapters also agreed to adopt Navajo principles of decision-making because of the need to be accountable to and respectful of all people and all life forms.

5. Navajo Nation sets new economic priorities to empower informal private sector. Leaders cited this layer of society as the truest expression of Indigenous–style economic thinking. The new Council declared this layer of Navajo society to be the best experts regarding needs to build strong local economies. “They speak the Navajo language and understand how to integrate principles of k’é and economics," one leader was heard to say.


So sorry to hear of the passing of my friend Larry Emerson. He leaves a gentle footprint on the world. -- Brenda Norrell, Censored News

Secwepemc Kanahus Manuel's Charges Dropped for Standing with Water Protectors

Kanahus Manuel said, "All five Standing Rock charges dropped today against myself and two others! Now we call on North Dakota to drop all charges against all Water Protectors. Free Red Fawn. Free Little Feather. Free them all!"

In the news at CBC:

All charges have been dropped against a Secwepemc activist from B.C. after she was arrested during the Standing Rock protests last year.
Kanahus Manuel was among dozens of people arrested near the construction of the North Dakota Access Pipeline Oct. 22, 2016.
She was in a courthouse in Mandan, ND Tuesday to face charges of criminal trespass, engaging in a riot, obstruction of a governmental function, disobedience of a public safety order during riot conditions and disorderly conduct.
She said Tuesday afternoon she was cleared of all charges and free to go home.
"They didn't have sufficient evidence," she said. "I'm feeling relieved."

PARIS Solidarity with Standing Rock Water Protectors and Mexico's Indigenous


Solidarity with Red Fawn, Standing Rock Water Protector
Concert Oct. 15, 2017, Paris
CSIA-Nitassinan
Solidarity Committee with American Indians



Solidarity with National Indigenous Congress of Mexico, Oct. 13, 2017
October 7, 2017 Galerie Orenda, Paris


Concert de solidarité avec RED FAWN, militante sioux-lakota incarcérée pour son combat contre l’oléoduc DAPL aux USA (CICP, le 15/10/17)
Dans le cadre de la tournée européenne des Water Protectors : « Decolonize America ! Water is Life ! » :
Concert de solidarité avec RED FAWN militante amérindienne incarcérée pour son combat contre l’oléoduc DAPL aux USA
Le dimanche 15 octobre 2017 - de 17h à 22h
au Centre international de culture populaire (CICP), 21ter rue Voltaire, Paris 11e (Métro : Rue des Boulets / RER : Nation)
Projection - débat avec des représentants autochtones ayant participé à la lutte contre l’oléoduc DAPL aux côtés de (...) Lire la suite
37e édition de la Journée internationale de solidarité avec les peuples amérindiens du CSIA-Nitassinan - « Décolonisons les Amériques - Hommage aux protecteurs de l’eau et de la Terre-Mère » » (Paris, le 14/10/17)
Réservez votre 14 octobre prochain : 37e édition de la Journée internationale de solidarité avec les peuples amérindiens du CSIA-Nitassinan
Comme chaque année depuis 1980, le CSIA-Nitassinan célèbre en région parisienne, la Journée internationale de solidarité avec les peuples amérindiens. Journée décrétée en 1977 par les représentants autochtones des Amériques rassemblés pour la première fois au siège des Nations Unies à Genève. Ce sera encore l’occasion pour les adhérents et les sympathisants du (...) Lire la suite

Soirée de solidarité avec le Congreso Nacional Indigena (CNI) et le Conseil indigène de Gouvernement (CIG) au Mexique (Paris, le 13/10/17)
Soirée de solidarité avec le Congreso Nacional Indigena (CNI) et le Conseil indigène de Gouvernement (CIG) au Mexique
Vendredi 13 octobre 2017 - à partir de 19h
au 33 rue des Vignoles, Paris 20e
Lieu déclaré "Aguascalientes" zapatiste en 1995 par Amado Avendaño Figueroa, ex-Gouverneur du Chiapas en rébellion— Métro : Buzenval ou Avron
Mots de bienvenue par le Secrétariat international de la CNT et inauguration de l’exposition ;
Projection d’une courte vidéo retraçant l’histoire du Congreso (...) Lire la suite

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Indigenous Women's Delegation to Europe: Banks are Funding Genocide and Environmental Destruction


Indigenous Women's Delegation to Europe, Fall of 2017, exposes banks responsible for Indigenous Genocide and Environmental Destruction

DIVEST: Join a local credit union and take your money out of Chase, Wells Fargo, Bank of America, US Bank and any other pipeline project investor!

This is the first step to take on hazardous banks that commit fraud, steal from our military soldiers, destroy our lands and bring harm to indigenous communities. Cities across the country have taken their money out of Wells Fargo already including Seattle and Los Angeles, are you up for the change?